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iL AUDITORIUMS 



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14188 




Rev. McNEELY DuBOSE, 

Foueth Rectok of St. Mary's, 1904-07. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 



Vol. XII. June-July, 1907. No. 1. 



The Commencement of 1907. 



Closing Events of the 65th Year of St. Mary's, 28-31, 1907. 

Starting two days later than the usual date and continuing a day later, 
St. Mary's was this year the last of the Raleigh schools to close its 
session. For the events of the week an unusually good proportion of the 
girls had remained, and with a goodly number of "old girls" and visitors 
present for the occasion, including parents or special home-friends of 
almost all of the graduates, the Commencement was a decided success, 
and the Class of 1907 received a most encouraging "send-off" from its 
Alma Mater. And the Class appreciated it all, even though the rain 
fell in torrents on Commencement Day, and for the first time in years 
the regular order had to be amended, the procession abandoned, and the 
whole of the final exercises held in the Chapel. This was especially 
trying because the earlier days of the week brought ideal weather which 
was thoroughly enjoyed, and the Commencement procession, which this 
year for the first time would have been from the Auditorium to the 
Chapel, is always a very pleasing feature of the exercises. 

The two features of the week, as previously announced, were the 
Dedication of the Memorial Auditorium on Wednesday night and the 
Consecration of the Chapel on Thursday morning. The address of 
Bishop Nelson on "Christian Education," on the first occasion, was 
masterly, while Bishop Bratton's sermon at the Consecration on "Re- 
sponsibility," touching in its simplicity and striking in its force, was 
one of the best that has ever been preached in that dear place. 

The presence of Bishops Bratton and Nelson, special guests, and of 
Bishops Cheshire, Strange and Horner of our Carolina dioceses, made 
a better representation of our fathers in the Church than it has been 
our privilege to have at St. Mary's in years, while the presence of these 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



gentlemen emphasized the absence of the one who was missing, beloved 
Bishop Capers of South Carolina, who was unable through illness to be 
here, and who, in the hearts of all at that time, is doubly so now, three 
weeks later, when he lies critically ill at his home in the mountains. 
The presence, too, of a practically full representation of the Board of 
Trustees, of Mrs. Sheib, the principal-elect, and of Miss Emilie McVea, 
of the University of Cincinnati, principal with the second Dr. Smedes, 
was a source of gratification. 

Tuesday Evening: Elocution and Expression Recital. 
Midstjmmeb Night's Deeam. 

The presentation of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" by the pupib 
of the Elocution Department, under the direction of Miss Cribbs, was 
an ambitious attempt for this young department, but inspired by the 
opportunities afforded by the new Auditorium Miss Cribbs boldly 
undertook it, though with the odds against her, and achieved a great and 
deserved success. 

The Auditorium was crowded with an appreciative audience, who 
were delighted throughout. The girls had practiced faithfully for the 
performance and received well-deserved compliments on their rendition 
of their parts. 

The Auditorium is not yet equipped with scenery, and great thanks 
are due Manager Baker, of the Kaleigh Opera House, for fitting the 
stage with suitable scenery, and for decided assistance in other respects 
in helping along the arrangements for the play. 

The pleasure of the evening was increased by the playing of the St. 
Mary's Orchestra, which, under the able direction of Miss Hull, ren- 
dered the overture, Barnard's "King Kose," and gave Strauss' "Dream 
Valse from "Ninetta" between the acts. 

The cast of characters for the play was as follows : 

Theseus, Duke of Athens, Christine Frazier. 

Egeus, father to Hermia, Marie Koiner. 

Lysander, in love with Hermia, Rosa Heath. 

Demetrius, in love with Hermia, Jennie Simpson. 

Philostrate, Master of Revels to Theseus, Mary Gwynn. 

Quince, a carpenter, Josephine Gilmer. 

Snug, a joiner, Ruth Newbold. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 3 



Bottom, a weaver, Emily Carrison. 

Flute, a bellows-mender, Inez Frazer. 

Snout, a tinker, Eloise Robinson. 

Starvelling, a tailor, Emilie Smith. 

Hippolyta, Queen of Amazons, betrothed to Theseus, Ila Thompson. 

Hermia, daughter to Egeus, in love with Lysander, Allene Gentry. 

Helena, in love with Demetrius, Helen Hall. 

Oberon, King of the Fairies, Minnie Leary. 

Titania, Queen of the Fairies, Nell Atkinson. 

Puck or Robin Goodfellow, Helen Strange. 

FAIRIES. 

Peasblossom, Katherine Hughes. 

Cobweb, Josephine Williford. 

Mustardseed, Isabel Jeffries. 

Indianboy, Mary Hadley. 

Florence Stone, Frances Strong, Belle Cameron, Margaret Mann, Edith Mann, Edna 
Mann, Rainsford DuBose, Elizabeth Hughes, Alice Giersch, Henrietta Schwartz. 

Wednesday Morning: Class Day Exercises. 

The Class Day exercises of the Class of 1907 were held as usual in 
the Grove in front of the Main Building. Combined with the usual 
exercises were some special features that aroused much interest, and 
thoroughly alive to the occasion, the Class made a very pretty picture as 
it moved about the Grove in the bright sunshine, now bearing the daisy- 
chain, now listening to the prophecy of the fate of its members, now 
adopting its class-tree in full and proper legal form, now consigning the 
treasures of school-life to the tender mercies of the "Witch's Caldron," 
and concluding with a spirited rendition of the Class Song, composed 
for the occasion by Mr. Hodgson in true Hodgson style. May the mem- 
bers of '07 live long and prosper all, but very rarely will they have as 
much enjoyment as they crowded into the one short hour of the class-day 
celebration. This was the program : 

1. School Song — "Alma Mater." 

2. Class History, Heber Birdsong. 

3. Class Poem, Helen Ball. 

4. The School Calendar, Written by Helen Katharine Liddell, 1908. 

Read by Helen Strange, representing the student-body. 

5. Class Bequests, Sue Brent Prince. 

6. Charge to the Junior Class, Mary James Spruill. 

7. Response for the Class of 1908, Elizabeth Turner Waddill. 

8. Adoption of the Tree. 

9. Class Song. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"E. W. T." writes in the News and Observer: 

The exercises yesterday morning were of especial interest to the student body, 
being that part of Commencement which is peculiarly their own— the class day 
exercises. 

By eleven-thirty the students and their guests had gathered in the grove in front 
of the stand, where was to take place the first part of the exercises. The platform 
and president's desk were attractive in a coating of white, over which were scattered 
many daisies — the class flower. 

The Class of '07 marched from the East Rock building, carrying a chain of daisies 
and singing the school song, "Alma Mater," in which the students in the grove at 
once joined heartily. After a few words of welcome from the class President, Miss 
Beatrice Bollmann Cohen, the class history, poem, prophecy, and the school calendar, 
were read, all of these being well written and clearly delivered. 

Then came an incident not mentioned on the program, but the most pleasing of 
the morning. Miss Lillian Hauser Farmer, representing not only the Class of '07, 
but also the school, presented to Mr. and Mrs. DuBose a loving cup. Miss Farmer 
spoke as follows: 

"Neither words nor material gifts are capable of expressing the love and apprecia- 
tion which St. Mary's, and especially the Class of '07, feels for our beloved rector 
and school mother. I say especially the Class of '07, because it was we who came 
in with them and we who go out with them, and consequently we feel that they are 
ours. And that our feelings may have outward expression, we, the Faculty and 
students of St. Mary's, present them with this loving cup in token of our deep respect 
and sincere love, and to show in some measure our regret that they will leave us." 

Mr. DuBose expressed the surprise and appreciation of himself and Mrs. DuBose 
in a few earnest words. 

The class having bestowed its farewell gifts on various fellow-students, and made 
its final charge to the Junior Class, again bearing the chain of daisies moved to a 
tree which had been already marked by streamers of yellow and gold — the class 
colors. Here the President read the legal petition of the Graduating Class for the 
adoption of the orphan tree, and the Court, Rev. Mr. DuBose, granted the petition, 
so the tree was declared the property of the petitioners, who in sign thereof encircled 
it with their chain of flowers. With much spirit the class then sang a song— 
modestly extolling their own accomplishments. 

At the conclusion of the song they took their places around a cauldron, and into 
the flaming pot each threw her own particular hindrance to happiness, telling at the 
same time in Shakespearean verse of her direful hatred for the loathed article. 

The exercises were marked by their originality, their generally interesting char- 
acter, and ease and spirit with which they were carried out. 

The presentation of the silver loving-cup was the distinct feature of 
the exercises. Mr. DuBose was taken entirely by surprise, but replied 
to the words of the presentation speech in a brief and characteristic 
speech full of appreciation and feeling. The cup is appropriately in- 
scribed on its three sides : 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Rev. McNeely DuBose, Rector, WOIf'Ol. 

Mrs. McNeely DuBose, School Mother, lOOJf-'OI. 

In loving appreciation of their work at St. Mary's. 

The Class Tree stands near the walk and to its left as one goes from 
the grounds, and is near the tree of 1905, now marked by 1905's class- 
stone, while 1906's tree is on the opposite side of the walk. All are 
nourishing. The legal formalities added interest to the adoption, 
though they did not aiford as much amusement as the verses at the 
cauldron, the products of the fertile brains of Mary Spruill and Louise 
Hill: 

Double, double, toil and trouble, 
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. 

'Round about tbe cauldron go, 
In the practice records throw, 
Cards that on the doors hung, 
Pad and pencil gladly flung. 

Rat, that up in Senior Hall, 
Days and nights did raise a squall, 
Trap that furnished him a feast, 
And only made a bigger beast. 

Hated bell that for exam. 
Warns us 'tis time to cram, 
Go thou in alarum clock, 
Boil thou next in the charmed pot. 

Double, double, toil and trouble, 
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. 

Latin Grammar — horrid thing, 
None will e'er your praises sing, 
Causing maidens' heads to ache, 
Et tu Brute, boil and bake. 

Disgusting little yellow slips, 
Needed for our down-town trips, 
Always signed "E. A. Pool," 
According to the hateful rule. 

Current History, taught by "Crook," 
Go thou in, thou hated book, 
For a charm of powerful trouble, 
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Double, double, toil and trouble, 
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. 

Examination questions here, 
Causing us such awful fear, 
Add thereto the papers punk. 
Very glad we didn't flunk. 

Next into the Cauldron throw 
Senior English — direful woe, 
With them throw all our themes 
Which haunted us with horrid dreams. 

Music, with its chords and scale, 
No more 'gainst your ear shall rail; 
And now everything is got 
For the ingredients of our pot. 

Double, double, toil and trouble, 
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. 



And this was the Class Song, hardly to be fully appreciated unless 
you are familiar with the Hodgson tune to which it "goes" : 



Hurrah! Hurrah! we're it, we're it, 
We've worked and bled and died and "fit," 
And now we know it every bit, 
We know it all. 

No use to try to teach us more, 
We're soaked in all earth's learned lore 
And lots of things not known before, 
We know them all. 

Tenax propositi' s our cry, 
We now go forth to do or die, 
And all mankind will straightway cry 
They know it all. 

We now go home as wisdom's leaven, 
Fair graduates of 1907, 
To give mankind a glimpse of heaven 
And bless them all. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Wednesday Afternoon: The Alumnae Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the alumnse was held as usual in the Studio 
on the afternoon of Thursday, May 30th, and was of peculiar interest. 
An extended account of the more important features is given in the 
Alumnae News. 

There was a large attendance of "St. Mary's girls," and among the 
number from a distance were Miss Emily W. McVea, of Cincinnati 
University, a former lady principal of St. Mary's; Mrs. Carrie Carr 
Mitchell, of Asheville; Mrs. Alex. Cooper, of Henderson; Miss Kate 
Cheshire, of Tarboro ; Miss Florence Thomas, of Charlotte, and others. 
Mrs. McNeely DuBose and Mrs. Sheib, St, Mary's lady-principal-elect, 
were guests of the occasion. 

The meeting was opened with an address by Bishop Bratton, of Mis- 
sissippi. He spoke of the St. Mary's of the past, with a beautiful 
tribute to the founder, Dr. Aldert Smedes, and to his son, Dr. Bennett 
Smedes, "that peculiar man, who threw himself into the breach, and 
with marvelous courage and faith held St, Mary's for the church and 
for an abiding work in the future history of the South." He spoke of 
the far-reaching influence of St. Mary's daughters, and finally of the 
need of a school endowment. 

On motion of Miss McVea, which was seconded and unanimously 
adopted, the Alumnse undertook for its new work the endowment of two 
scholarships, to be called, respectively, the Mary Iredell and Kate Mc- 
Kimmon Scholarships, in loving appreciation of what these two noble 
women have been and are to the lives of the many St. Mary's girls, 
whose privilege it has been to have been thrown with them. A com- 
mittee was appointed with Miss McVea as chairman, to determine upon 
methods of procedure towards completing this endowment. 

The graduating class was then formally received and welcomed as 
members of the Alumna?, and the Smedes' Scholarship girl was con- 
gratulated and warmly thanked for the example of her life at St. 
Mary's in three years of blameless conduct and faithful work, conclud- 
ing with her graduation with the highest honor of her class. 

The election of officers resulted as follows : 

President — Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Vice-President^ — Mrs. F. P. Tucker, Raleigh; Mrs. Kate deR. 
Meares, Charlotte ; Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham ; Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, 
Raleigh. 

Secretary — Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer — Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 

These are all re-elections except the election of Miss Dowd as Treas- 
urer, to relieve Miss McKimmon, who has heretofore been both Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

Wednesday Evening: Dedication of the Auditorium. 

There were two disappointments in connection with the exercises at 
the presentation of The Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Auditorium, 
the first due to the inability of the Governor of the State, Hon. Robert 
B. Glenn, to be present on the occasion and deliver the dedication ad- 
dress, and the second the absence of Bishop Capers, who had seen the 
building in its incomplete state when he was at St. Mary's for the 
February meeting of the Trustees, and was to have accepted the finished 
building for them. 

The building is a model of its kind, unpretentious, but well-adorned, 
and beautiful throughout, The central skylight is the crowning bit of 
adornment, and in the varied electrical effects is lovely. The stage is 
spacious and can be readily equipped with scenery and adapted to the 
various and varying needs of public student appearances, as was evi- 
denced at this Commencement, while it is at present all that could be 
wished for lectures and recitals. 

Bishop Cheshire, who spoke for Mr. Dancy in his absence, in pre- 
senting the building, sounded the key-note for the new campaign for 
the increased improvement and growth of the work at St. Mary's, and 
paid a very graceful tribute to the Pittmans, mother and daughter. 
Bishop Nelson, in his masterly address on "Christian Education," 
treated the general theme in which St. Mary's is most interested in a 
manner worthy of the occasion. 

Bishop Horner, of Asheville, presided at the meeting, while the mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees were seated on the stage with him. 
Bishop Bratton was also reluctantly drawn there before the exercises 



The St. Mas* s Muse. 9 



began and received such a greeting from his old friends as was good 
to witness. 

The program was as follows: 

Valse Passionee, Montagna. 

St. Mary's Orchestra. 
Presentation of the Building to the Trustees, 

Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D. 
Hymn— "Blest Be the Tie That Binds." 
Acceptance of the Building for the Trustees, 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner. 

Schlummerlied, Schumann. 

St. Mary's Orchestra. 
Address — "Christian Education," 

Rt. Rev. Kinloch Nelson, D.D. 

Hungarian Gypsy Dance, Isenman. 

St. Mary's Orchestra. 

The daily papers said: 

The presentation of the Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Auditorium occurred last 
night. The presentation of the building to the Trustees was made by Rt. Rev. Joseph 
Blount Cheshire, D.D., Bishop of North Carolina, and the beautiful memorial was 
accepted for the Trustees by Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, Bishop of Asheville. Bishop 
Horner presided. The address of the evening was delivered by Rt. Rev. Cleveland 
Kinloch Nelson, Bishop of Georgia. Bishop Nelson impressed his intelligent audi- 
ence with a learned discourse on "Christian Education." He is one of the foremost 
Christian workers in the South, and has already left his impress upon many Southern 
States. He is as learned as eloquent, and his hearers were both delighted and 
edified. 

The exercises were begun at 8:30 o'clock in the new Auditorium, St. Mary's 
excellent orchestra opening the exercises with Montagna's beautiful "Valse Pas- 
sionee," which was played with charm and brilliancy. 

Bishop Cheshire's Address. 

In presenting the Auditorium to the Trustees Bishop Cheshire said in part: 
"I am sorry that Mr. Dancy can not be with us to take upon himself the gracious 
office of formally presenting to the Trustees of St. Mary's School this noble memorial 
of one of her loveliest daughters. But as he is not able to be present, I confess that 
it is by my own desire that I represent him, when I might have had a better and 
an abler man to speak for him. And I have wished to do this because, excepting 
only Mr. Dancy himself, I believe there is no one who could on this occasion speak 
for him with a truer sentiment of respect and affection for the mother and daughter 
whom this building commemorates than I, who now address you. 

2 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"This is the beginning of a new stage in the progress of St. Mary's School. The 
first work to be done was to pay for the grounds and buildings, and to make them 
in some measure adequate to the purposes of the school. It is a significant fact, 
and one of happy omen, that the money for this cause came not from the few, but 
from the many; not chiefly from the rich, but from hundreds of persons, mostly of 
small means, in all parts of the Carolinas, and from daughters and friends of St. 
Mary's beyond our own borders. Our foundations are well and solidly laid in the 
hearts of all our people, rich and poor alike. * * 

"I knew them both— the mother from my earliest years; the daughter from her 
infancy. They were both daughters of St. Mary's, and they loved it for what it 
had done for them. 

"The mother was of one of our most distinguished families of Edgecombe, a family 
for many generations prolific of useful and eminent men, and of noble and attractive 
women— of women who found their highest honor and happiness in serving and 
blessing the homes which their presence adorned and beautified. The daughter united 
the grace and beauty of her mother with the intellectual force of her distinguished 
father; and was as truly dignified in the simple and unconscious elevation of a pure 
and noble spirit, as she was beautiful in person with the charms of opening woman- 
hood. I speak with perfect sincerity, and, I believe, with no exaggeration of expres- 
sion when I say that I have never known a young girl who seemed to me to combine 
in a higher degree both the inward and outward excellences of a clear and strong 
intelligence, a pure and serene spirit, and a beautiful and gracious presence. I say 
so much because on this occasion I must speak of her; and I give the exact impres- 
sion which she has left on my memory. And having said so much, need I say more? 

"I have the pleasure and the privilege, in behalf of Mr. Dancy, in fulfillment of the 
pious purpose of his mother, of presenting to the Trustees of St. Mary's School 'The 
Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial.' " 

Bishop Horner Accepts. 

Bishop Horner, in a brief sentence, but with appreciative and appropriate words, 
accepted the building in behalf of the Trustees. He declared it to be the hope of the 
Trustees that there may be many more memorials like this to be presented to the 
school, and he assured all the graciousness with which they would be received. 

After the orchestra had rendered "Schummerleid," by Schumann, Bishop Nelson 
delivered a stirring address on "Christian Education." 

Bishop Nelson's Address. 

Bishop Nelson spoke in part as follows: 

"It is not incumbent upon me to argue the righteousness of woman's claim for 
a due share in the educational scheme and provision of our land. We could not 
rightly call our country civilized should we deny that our daughters as well as our 
sons must be considered proper subjects for the best education the State or the 
nation can afford. 

"The perfect equipment of woman in her faculties of intellect and will, as well 
as of affections and desires, would seem to be a statum of civilization, did we not 
know the records of the past to show a complete lack of recognition of so primary 
a fact. 



The St. Maky's Muse. n 



"But what the Gospel has done for woman is to recognize that she has a soul to 
be saved, that she has life and privileges and hopes which are neither dependent upon 
nor growing out of relationship to the other sex. 

"The Gospel has delivered woman from slavery and from being a tool, a chattel, 
a drudge, a household convenience or necessity, and has set her in her rightful place 
as a person with individual aspirations and preferences, possessing worth and char- 
acter in herself and not as the result of having a father, a husband or a brother. 

"In the crisis of civilization which Christianity wrought there was created a status 
for woman such as no poet ever described in his apotheosis of beauty, of wit, or of 
any other quality. She became possessed of identity to confess a creed, to entertain 
sentiments, to form and enter into plans for the public good of others than the little 
home circle which rightly claims her first attention. The Gospel not only placed 
woman where Eve, fresh from her Creator's hand, stood— by man's side as his help- 
meet, but exalted her far beyond that, even to being the great moral and spiritual 
influence to correct deficiencies, to supplement the weaker parts of the man's nature, 
and to be the guardian of his nobler life, the spring of high purpose and the conse- 
cration of his supreme hopes for time and for eternity. 

"No consideration of the elements of civilization can be regarded as complete 
which fails to include woman's contribution to the internal progress of individuals 
and the development of the social state of mankind. 

"And the examples cited will embrace not only saintly queens and princesses whose 
lives have been devoted to charity and reformation, but will include many thousands 
whose spheres have been circumscribed by small circles of influence, oft-times by the 
narrow walls of a small home. 

"For in addition to the extensive work of organization and leadership in fields of 
intimate concern to their struggling, tempted and heart-sore sisters, there is the 
ever multiplying opportunity for intensive service in dealing with individual moral 
dereliction and the early and continued direction of character in its formation, the 
value of which can never be computed except by an arithmetical progression of which 
the index is an unknown quantity and the co-efficient is love. 

"The value of Christian education for a woman is to be tested by an inquiry as 
to what it is capable of doing for her; (1) for herself, and (2) as a member of 
society, and the reasons will appear coincidentally why, in spite of all the difficulties 
involved, and of the costs for which the equivalent does not seem immediately in 
hand, some of us hold so tenaciously and confidently to the importance of this form 
of Christian endeavor. 

"If we assume, as we should assume, that the development of the spiritual faculty 
begins in the home, the Christian school has a definite function in perfecting that 
side of woman's nature. 

"If it does not there begin: if the many observable instances of parental neglect 
are indications of a widespread oversight and indifference in those things which are 
the most distinguishing marks of a religious being; if parents and guardians consider 
their duty performed when they have fed, clothed and housed their children or their 
wards, and delegate the moral direction to the Sunday school teacher, and the culture 
of the highest and most enduring aspirations to the influence of the pastor in a 



12 The St. Maey's Muse. 



twenty-minute address once a week; if regulative discipline and wholesome method 
and mutual attentions be absent from home-life; if associations are not selected; 
if life means no more than existence according to the conventions and usages of the 
environment; if good health and good appearance and good manners are the prin- 
cipal aim; if a girl is brought up in ignorance of her capacities for love and hate, 
for good or evil, for selfishness or service; if, finally, the grandeur of life and the 
glory of destiny are forever obscured by a cloud of materialism and the thick curtain 
of sheer worldliness, then the Christian school is a prime necessity, an indispensable 
nursery of thoughts, opinions, desires and motives, and the only remaining safeguard 
in existence against the most terrible abuse of powers and gifts, the only protection 
against ruin here and hereafter. 

"And as none of the foregoing hypotheses are imaginary, as we have supposed 
nothing which may not be verified in the experience of thousands; we fail to dis- 
cover any weakness in those who sustain, nor any reason or excuse in those who 
decry church schools. 

"In every girlish face we see a picture of mother, wife or sister, appealing to ut 
to grant them that blessing which comes from light and truth and grace, and to 
fit them by knowledge gained of experience for the earnest life ahead, and 
' To gain in life as life advances 
Valor and charity more and more.' 

"Whatever elements may assist in perfecting womanhood, it is beyond any reason- 
able doubt that moral beauty imparts grace in word and deed and that indefinable 
thing called charm, the lack of which leaves physical beauty insipid, intellect exas- 
perating, and converts the finest accomplishments into the paint and powder and 
tinsel of the stage. 

"Christian education is the corrective of the fancied delights which appear to 
youth in the glitter of earthly modes and influential connections that are fully and 
freely advertised to make men stare and gape; it substitutes for wealth and mere 
fashion a happiness no less light-hearted because of soberness, and supported by the 
consciousness of a possession in hand rather than by the promised indulgence in 
feminine proclivities. 

"Christian education develops that equipoise of character in which judgment takes 
the place of fancy, and discretion, not prudery , holds in check youthful extravagance 
and mistaken trustfulness in the general excellence of all people and things, which 
have not been criticised or called into question. 

"As a member of human society woman enjoys not only privileges and immunities 
in the new position which is accorded her, but owes duties to civilization which ean 
not discharge, and incurs responsibilities of the most solemn and far-reaching nature. 

"It is hers to formulate the terms upon which man may be admitted into the circle 
of persons of character; hers to ennoble life by the model which she prescribes, and 
hers to banish into limbo profligancy, indelicacy, and all attempts of imitation of 
greatness and importance. 

"She, and none other, holds the key of admission into the company of the virtuoui 
and the honorable. 

"Her stand for faith and right will be governed by sanity, modesty and dignity 
will be recognized and obeyed. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

"This school, and others based upon good foundation principles and constructed 
on this model, are the embodiment of certain accepted obligations of the church of 
mankind. 

"It is no subordinate part of her commission to educate all who can be brought 
within the range of her control and influence, but is doubly stressed in the parting 
charge of the founder of Christianity. 'Go ye make disciples of all men, * * * 
teaching them to observe all things which I command you.' How can one who 
believes these words doubt their application to our theme, or fail to realize that the 
coming of the kingdom for which we so often pray is hastened by religious edu- 
cation ? 

"For what does it involve? 

"Pre-eminently the establishment of ideals furnished in the teachings and life of 
the "teacher come from God," and the inculcation of those habits which conduce to 
the highest happiness of the individual, the well-being of society, and the peace of 
the world. 

"Beyond acceptance of the Christian rule of conduct, to which as a Christian 
nation we are committed, unless we are utterly secularized and heathenized, it is no 
duty nor engagement of the State to teach or preach religion in any form. But I 
submit that it is the duty of the State, in the character of an impartial guardian of 
the liberty and welfare of all citizens, to prevent teachings that are prejudicial to 
religion, and the propagation through its text-books or the avowed convictions of the 
teachers employed, of error or misrepresentation of any religious denomination. 
Honor and justice demand this much of all school superintendents. 

"I should be in favor of a censorship of sectarian schools, which would forbid the 
exhibition of unfriendly temper by such methods and confine them to their legitimate 
indoctrination. 

''The Jew, the Roman Catholic, even the Protestant Episcopalian, has rights in 
this matter which the State should protect. 

"To allow the teaching in the public schools that Henry VIII. founded the Church 
of England is to abet a falsehood like the popular teaching that all Eoman Catholics 
are idolaters, or that all Jews are infidels. No intelligent and conscientious public 
school superintendent will admit the introduction of text-books which perpetuate 
untruths inimical to any religion. He may know, and it is his business to know, 
of the existence of this fraud and to obviate the repetition of an inane slur that a 
king of the sixteenth century founded an institution whose rights are of record in 
Magna Charta, and the identical name, Church of England, appears in deeds and 
documents centuries before Henry VIII. was born or his line had come to the throne. 

"Thus we come to view another valuable function of the church school, which is 
to stand openly and strongly for positive truth, not negative error; for order and 
for liberty, not liberty to do anything or say anything we please to the detriment 
of the other man, but the full enjoyment by him, as well as by us, of freedom of 
choice of belief and of practice in accordance with the best laws which our civiliza- 
tion provides. Above all a Christian school should be governed by the law of charity, 
and its efforts be to carry forward civilization itself nearer and nearer to that which 
constitutes the perfection of society." 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Thursday Morning: Consecration of the Chapel. 

While for the friends of St. Mary's generally the chief feature of 
Commencement was found in the Presentation of the Auditorium, 
marking as it does the beginning of a new stage in the life of the 
school, in which all hope to see it grow and develop in a way far 
greater than has been possible under the different conditions of the 
past, yet to the alumnae no other event compared in interest to the Con- 
secration of the Chapel on Thursday morning. While the step was 
taken at this Commencement because for the first time it was possible 
to consecrate the building on account of its being the full unencum- 
bered property of the Church, yet the occasion was an especially timely 
one, for this was also the 50th anniversary of the building of the Chapel. 

Bishop Bratton's sermon was addressed to the graduating class and 
students, but both in the preliminary reference to the Consecration occa- 
sion and in the sermon proper the Bishop was at his best and the ser- 
mon made a deep impression on all who heard it. 

In preparation for the formal consecration, neat marble posts had 
been placed to mark the four corners of the church-yard. 

To quote further from the daily press: 

The consecration services were impressive and beautiful, and were followed by a 
deeply spiritual sermon preached by Bishop T. D. Bratton, of Mississippi. 

The services were held in the Chapel, beginning at 11 o'clock and concluding at 
1:30. The Clergy opened the procession, followed by the lay Trustees, acting as a 
vestry, and these were followed by the Bishops. The procession moved up into the 
chancel, and the Trustees took their places before the altar rail. 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, Rector of St. Mary's, read the petition for consecration on 
the part of the Trustees, after which Rev. J. E. Ingle, Secretary of the Diocese of 
North Carolina, read the sentence of consecration for Bishop Cheshire, the latter 
then reading the formal prayer of consecration, which closed the consecration service. 

Sermon on Obligation. 

Bishop Bratton preached an interesting sermon on Obligation, selecting aa his 
text Romans 14:12: "So then every one of us shall give account of himself unto 
God." In his beautiful discourse Bishop Bratton spoke in part as follows: 

"We can not doubt that St. Paul is directing our minds to those thoughts which 
anchor the soul of man. He is really anxious to lay down a principle in this portion 
of the Epistle which would relieve the people of carping criticisms and unjust judg- 
ing in those days. One thing stood out above all other things, that for themselves 



The St. Maky's Muse. 15 

they should have to give an account to Almighty God, and as this was important 
to the people in those days, so it is important to you, who are just assuming the 
duties of life to God and your fellow-man. 

"There are two powerful words in our language, duty and responsibility. It is 
the idea of responsibility that St. Paul was speaking when he said we shall have to 
render an account. What is it we shall give an account of? St. Paul answers this 
question: We shall have to give an account of ourselves. Why shall we have to 
give an account of our actions, thoughts and motives? Our acts, good or bad, even 
the very circumstances which made us what we are, are often under our own control. 
Your responsibility follows upon your power to choose. I can choose each act of my 
being, so I am responsible for my character. We are not going to have to give an 
account of other folks, but we are responsible for them in the right every human 
being owes to his fellow, but we will not have to give an account for him. 

"To whom shall we have to give this account ? St. Paul answers the question him- 
self: It must be rendered to God. The only safety of society rests upon a realiza- 
tion of the responsibility of society and the obligation we owe to one another. It 
is sometimes said of people that they don't have any responsibilities at all, but there 
is nobody in this wide world who escapes responsibility and accountability, and our 
accountability to Him rests upon the strictest basis of right. The parable of the 
talents affords a key to this aspect of our subject. Everything finally has its limit, 
and it is God who limits it. We can use our gifts perfectly, as that parable means, 
or we may use them like the man of one talent. We may use them perfectly, but 
we can not add an iota to them. Let us get rid of the idea that people have a right 
to do as they please. You and I have no right to do as we please, but only what 
we ought to do. Obligation is the law of human life. 

"I wonder if we consider how much we have to do to influence God's judgments of 
ourselves and our comrades. In human judgments there is still room for guess, for 
uncertainty, but not so with God's judgments. He knows the heart. Our daily acts 
are forming the judgment of God. There is a fire of affliction, a healing in the 
furnace which God prepares that He may better mould human character. It is I and 
I alone who am the responsible arbiter of my being. We shall find the judgment 
of God to be absolutely just, absolutely true, because we did it. It has been said 
that the greatest motive power in this world is love — love of God. The Divine in- 
spiration that would come with twenty-four hours of unalloyed love for God would 
make us other beings, and there would be well nigh nothing impossible to us in the 
universe. Then the second most powerful motive power is fear; it is almost the 
crowning virtue. Not the cringing kind of fear, that should not come into our lives, 
but holy fear, and it would be almost impossible to love without this holy fear — the 
fear of displeasing. 

"Suppose you take this as one of your motives of life, your accountability to God; 
and suppose as you go to bed at night you will say, I shall have to give an account 
unto God for all that I have done this day; and suppose you every morning before 
jou begin your tasks should say to yourself, I shall have to render an account unto 
God for my every thought, motive and act to-day. It would make your life higher 
and better. 



16 The St. Maby's Muse. 



'"To live in God's great, beautiful world, to use it to the uttermost, but to use it 
as a child of the living God, this is your problem in life which must be rightly 
solved, if solved at all, in the life of the individual. And there is a duty to be done 
in life. Too often this world is treated as a private garden. It is God's world, and 
He has made this world His for a purpose. Not a thing your hand touches but has a 
purpose. If God has made all the creatures here to minister to one another, what 
has He made us for, crowning all creation, but to minister to Him who gave Hi» 
life for our ransom." 

After the sermon the holy sacrament of the Lord's Supper was administered, and 
the services ended. 

Thursday Afternoon: The Commencement Reception and the 

Art Exhibit. 

Thursday afternoon from five to six the usual Commencement recep- 
tion was held in the parlor. The room was very tastily decorated in 
daisies and bamboo. The guests were received by the Bishop and 
Mrs. Cheshire, the Rector and Mrs. DuBose, the Governor and Mrs. 
Glenn, and Mrs. L. W. Skeib, the Lady Principal-elect, 

From the reception the guests passed to the studio, where the annual 
exhibit of the Art Department was displayed. 

The reception held in the studio was enjoyed by a large number of 
visitors. The exhibit was well arranged and most interesting and espe- 
cially creditable as the work of first and second year students, there be- 
ing no advanced pupils in the department. There was some good draw- 
ing from blocks, from still life and from casts; among these, conspic- 
uous for merit, being two studies by Miss Jessie Harris. The original 
conventional designs in black and white showed good work, among the 
best being pieces by Misses Carile Weaver and Marion Baker, and one 
by Master St. Pierre DuBose. 

Among the charcoal landscapes and pen and ink drawings (copiei 
of etchings) were some very good work by Miss Elizabeth Waddill and 
Miss Alice Stokes. The exhibit in oils showed some good original 
work, including "Bananas," by Miss Rosa Heath ; "Books and Candle 
Stick," by Miss Ruth Newbold; "Basket and Oranges," by Miss Inez 
Frazer, and some artistically treated "Wisteria" and "Yellow Jasmine," 
by Miss Annie Root. 

The water color studies from still life show earnest work, the studies 
deserving special mention being a "Pumpkin Group," by Patsie Smith, 
and a realistic "Apple Study," by Miss Nell Wilson. 




Mes. McNEELY DuBOSE, 
"School Mother" 1904-07. 



The St. Mast's Musb. 17 



The large landscape and fruit studies, by Miss Alice Stokes, deserve 
mention, as also the Venetian scene, by Miss Pattie Moore; "Yellow 
Roses," by Miss Eloise Kobinson, and two small clearly done scenes in 
water color, by Miss Nell Wilson. 

The designs for stained glass windows were very attractive, the Grape 
Vine, by Miss Robinson, being especially noticeable. 

The little children's work made a pretty panel in the exhibit, some of 
the studies deserving special notice being a pitcher and lemon, by Eliza- 
beth Brown; apples, by Marion Baker; apples and jug, by Henrietta 
Schwartz, and an oil landscape, by Rainsford DuBose. 

Miss Clara Fenner, the head of the department, is a teacher of 
energy and ability, and is to be congratulated on the success of her 

work. 

Thursday Evening: The Annual Concert. 

The annual pupils' recital of the Music Department was held on 
the evening before Commencement, this year in the Auditorium. While 
the Department had a decidedly smaller number of advanced pupils 
than usual from which to draw, the Concert was a pronounced success, 
and was highly praised by those present. Mr. Vincent, the Director, 
and his associate teachers deserve much credit for the result. 

The program was as follows: 

Ballade in G Minor, Rheinberger. 

Mary Alexander. 

Ever of Thee, Denza - 

Isabel Brogden. 

Barcarole in G Minor, Tschaikowsky. 

Margaret Pennington. 

May Morning, Denza. 

Desdemona Creighton. 

(a) Song Without Words, Berwald. 

(ft) Im Zeugernernlager, Schytte. 

Blanche King. 

(a) Maiden's Song, Meyer-Helmund. 

(ft) Boat Song, Graben-Hoffman. 

Misses Gilmer, Brogden, Turner, Newbold. 

Concerto, Op. 13, Seite - 

Allegro non troppo. Adagio, allegretto moderato. 

Browning Adickes. 

3 



18 The St. Mabt's Muse. 

Tarantelle, 

Loewe. 

Margaret Williams. 

Nymphs and Fauns, „ , 

-Bemberg. 

Josephine Gilmer. 

Concerto in C Major (First Movement), Mozart 

Maud Eberhardt. 

Friday Morning: Graduating Exercises. 

After three days of beautiful weather, Friday morning- brought rain 
in a steady down-pour, and April showers seemed the order of the day. 
But the hearts of the graduates and their friends were too full of happi- 
ness for their brightness to be affected by the gloom of the day, and 
except for the necessity of omitting the procession and shortening the 
exercises held in the Chapel all was well. 

The graduates and "certificate girls" were loaded down with flowers 
by their appreciative friends, the program was rendered with a vim, the 
charge to the graduates by Bishop Cheshire and the remarks of Bishop 
Strange in presenting the tfiles Medal struck just the right chord, and 
everyone was full of the spirit of the occasion. 
The regular program was as follows : 

In the Auditorium. 

(a) In April, _. 

, j, . , . , ,, . Gounod. 

(0) Sunshine and Rain, B1 ... 

Chorus. 
Salutatory, 

Emily Jordan Carrison. 
Class Essay, 

Mary James Spruill. 

(a) Vanya's Song from "The Postillions," Von gtutzman. 

(o) Because I Love You, Dear, . „ i 

rlawley. 

Josephine Gilmer. 
Valedictory, 

Lillian Hauser Farmer. 

In the Chapel. 

Processional Hymn— Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand, No. 396. 
Devotional Exercises. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Certificates and Distinctions. 
Address to the Graduates, 

Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D. 
Prayer and Benediction. 
Recessional Hymn — Jerusalem High Tower. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 19 



The News and Observer comments: 

The graduation exercises were held in the College Chapel, because of the inclement 
weather, preventing the rendering of that part of the program which was to have 
been presented in the Auditorium. Thus the delightful music, always an artistic and 
one of the most beautiful and entertaining features of Commencement, was omitted, 
as these numbers could not be given in the Chapel. 

The graduation exercises began at 11 o'clock, the processional hymn being "Ten 
Thousand Times Ten Thousand." The devotional exercises, brief but impressive, 
were conducted by Bishop Cheshire. 

The Salutatory, an excellent composition, was read by Miss Emily Jordan Carri- 
son, of Camden, S. C, after which Miss Mary James Spruill, of Littleton, read the 
Class Essay, which was a fine exhibit of learning, literary skill and charming humor. 

The Valedictory was read by Miss Lillian Hauser Farmer, of Florence, S. C, and 
was indicative of splendid talent and showed beautiful sentiment. 

The Niles medal was awarded to Miss Paula Elizabeth Hazard, of Georgetown, 
S. C.j of the Freshman Class, whose average was 97.06, just .07 of 1 per cent less 
than the average of Miss Lillian Farmer, first honor member of the Senior Class, 
the winner of the medal at the last Commencement. She was disqualified from the 
award of the medal under the conditions, although her average, 97.13, was the 
highest. The deportment of both of these young ladies was without flaw throughout 
the session. 

The medal was presented to Miss Hazard by Bishop Strange. 

In lieu of the regular Muse prizes, the Muse managers decided to award but one 
prize to the student who throughout the session had been pre-eminent in contributing 
to the success of the Muse, monthly and annual, by her literary productions. This 
student was Miss Helen Katherine Liddell, of Charlotte. 

Bishop Cheshire made a brief address to the Graduating Class, urging them to 
remember the fundamental principles of life, and encouraging them to persevere in 
right doing, after which he pronounced the benediction. 

The recessional hymn, "Jerusalem High Tower," closed the exercises. 

The Salutatory, Essay, and Valedictory are printed elsewhere in this 
Muse. Diplomas, certificates and distinctions were conferred as fol- 
lows : 

Diplomas. 
THE COLLEGE CLASS OF 1907. 

Helen Ball '. B,aleigh, N. C. 

Heber Corinne Birdsong Raleigh, N. C. 

Emily Jordan Carrison Camden, S. C. 

Beatrice Bollmann Cohen Florence, S. C. 

Lillian Hauser Farmer Florence, S. C. 

Louise Hill Lexington, N. C. 

Alice McCullers McCullers, N. C. 

Sue Brent Prince Wilmington, N. C. 

Mary James Spruill Littleton, N. C. 



20 The St. Maby's Muse. 



THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Mary E. Alexander Creswell, N. C. 

Susan F. Bynum Lincolnton, N. C. 

Certificates. 

THE COLLEGE. 

Certificate in the English Course. 

Serena Cobia Bailey Palatka, Fla. 

Marguerite Ashley Short Wilmington, N. C. 

Helen Strange Wilmington, N. C. 

BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Stenography and Typewriting. 

Mary L. Carraway New Bern, N. C. 

Ruby G. Davis Raleigh, N. C. 

Pattie L. Wall Rockingham, N. C. 

Margaret Foy Yancey .Raleigh, N. C. 

The Honor Roll for 1906. 

The highest general award of merit is the Honor Roll, an- 
nounced at Commencement. The requirements are: 

(1) The pupil must have been in attendance the entire ses- 
sion and have been absent from no duty at any time during 
the session without the full consent of the Rector, and with 
lawful excuse. 

( 2 ) She must have had during the year a full regular course 
of study or its equivalent, and carried this work to successful 
completion, taking all required examinations. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" 
(90 per cent) or better in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" in De- 
portment. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory 
bearing in the affairs of her school life during the year. 

The Honor Roll for 1907 is : 

Emily Jordan Carrison Camden, S. C. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain West Raleigh, N. C. 

Lillian Hauser Farmer Florence, S. C. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Louise Hill Lexington, N. C. 

Julia Louise Mclntyre Mullins, S. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Mary James Spruill Littleton, N. C. 

Elizabeth Turner Waddill Cheraw, S. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 

The Niles Medal. 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence 
was instituted by Kev. Chas. M. Niles, D.D., of 
Columbia, S. C, in 1906. It is awarded to the pupil 
who has made the best record in scholarship and de- 
portment during* the session. 

The medal is awarded to the same pupil only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are : 

( 1 ) The pupil must have taken throughout the year at least 
"'15 points" of regular work; and have satisfactorily completed 
this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) The pupil must have been "Excellent" in deportment. 

(3) The pupil must have taken all regular general courses 
assigned and done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) The pupil must be a regular student of the College 
Department. 

The second award of this medal was made in 1907 to 
Miss Paula Elisabeth Hazard, '10, of Georgetown, 8. C, 
whose average in scholarship was 97.06, and whose average in 
deportment was 100. 

Distinguished in Scholarship, 1907. 

"To be distinguished in scholarship a pupil must have main- 
tained at least a minimum course in the Academic Depart- 
ment; must have been 'Excellent' in deportment; and have an 
average of 95 per cent or more in her studies." 

Pr. Ct. 

1 . Lillian Hauser Farmer, '07 97 . 13 

2. Paula Elizabeth Hazard, '10 97 . 06 

3. Georgia Stanton Hales, '09 96 . 57 

4. Julia Louise Mclntyre, '09 96 . 29 

5. Mary James SpruilL '07 95 . 51 

6. Elizabeth Turner Waddill, '08 95.21 

Primary Department Honors. 

Honorary Mention: 
Josephine Williford. Catherine Hughes. 

To be commended for progress in studies of the department. 

Florence Douglas Stone. Frances Lambert Strong. 

Alice May Giersch. 



22 The St. Maby's Muse. 



The 1907 Salutatory. 



EMILY JORDAN CABRISON. 



To our own revered Bishop, to our honored guest, the Bishop of East 
Carolina, to our respected Board of Trustees, to our beloved Rector, to 
our teachers and fellow-students, and to our dear home people and 
friends assembled, greeting! 

To me has been given the privilege and the great pleasure of wel- 
coming you on our Commencement day, a time so close to our hearts, 
both for its joys and its sorrows. We wish to express our pleasure 
at seeing in our midst so many friends who, by their presence, add to 
the enjoyment of this day, the crowning period of our hopes and aspi- 
rations of the past four years. 

Naturally each class considers its Commencement the most import- 
ant, but it must be generally recognized that this Commencement is 
peculiarly interesting in the history of St. Mary's. Now, for the first 
time, our dearly loved school is free and untrammeled to go forward in 
its noble work. Not only has the debt been paid, but during our term 
of life at St. Mary's the infirmary has been completed and fully 
equipped ; the auditorium, a memorial of one of St. Mary's daughters, 
has been built and dedicated, and the chapel, ever the soul of St Mary's, 
has been enlarged, beautified and publicly consecrated to the service of 
God. We count it among our special privileges to have had with us a 
former rector, the Bishop of Mississippi, whose words to us in our 
Commencement Sermon will ever be a guide and inspiration in the new 
life upon which we are now entering. We feel that we have seen the 
dawn of a new era in the life of our dear Alma Mater which, losing 
nothing of the tradition of the past, will now press forward to a broader, 
fuller life. 

So, in the name of the class of nineteen seven, I bid you a hearty 
welcome. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 23 



The Class Essay. 



MARY JAMES SPRUILL. 



The Idylls of the King. 

The story worked up in Tennyson's "Idylls of the King" is an old 
one, so old that no one can tell how it arose. While it is supposed that 
there was an historical Arthur who fought twelve great battles with the 
English heathen, and who had many hero-chieftains under his sway, 
and while from the twelfth century the Britons had told tales about 
this brave king and warrior, yet we have no reason to suppose that 
these stories are true in details to authentic history. 

The direct source of Tennyson's story, how T ever, was Malory's '"Morte 
d' Arthur," written in 1469. Tennyson's story differs from Malory's 
in that his Arthur is an ideal man and king, whereas in Malory there 
are really two Arthurs, one a man of no very high moral standing, the 
other an almost ideal knight and king. But Tennyson's ideal is not 
an ideal of mediaeval or Celtic times, but one of his own age — as he 
himself said, "my own ideal knight," and a ''modern gentleman." 

And not only does he make his king ideal, but also the country over 
which that king reigned and waged his wars. It is a romantic country, 
a country of woods and streams, hills and moors, marsh and desert, 
dark oceans and vast wastes, of peaceful hamlets and wonderful cities, 
spacious halls and great palace courts. And in the scenery and land- 
scape of that country there is not a touch of the real world any more 
than there is in the scenery and landscape of fairy land, of dreamland, 
or any land that can not be seen, but only imagined. 

The personages as well as the country are romantic and dreamlike. 
They are unlike the people we daily meet with, unfit to dwell in our 
every day world, or any world save the one Tennyson created for them. 

This romantic treatment of country and character is easily under- 
stood when we remember that the story of Arthur moved Tennyson 
only as a romance at first. "Morte d' Arthur," published in 1842, fol- 
lows the old romance and breathes its air. But later this intention of 
treating the story as a romance changed to the intention of making out 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



of it an allegorical epic. When the volume beginning with "The Com- 
ing of Arthur" was published, this idea was fully implanted in his 
mind, and it influenced his later work. The poem is not an epic, but it 
borders on the epic, for in it there is one, central, dominant figure to- 
wards whom all the actions as well as all the personages converge. In 
the actions of this figure, the pure, generous, tender, brave, human- 
hearted Arthur, Tennyson tells us to look for epic unity. His deeds 
are the links which bind the Idylls into a whole. 

The poem is made epic not only by the unity which the one central 
figure gives it, but by the position of the hero at the close. The hero 
of an epic must, in the end, have a moral victory over fate, even though 
he seems conquered and ruined. This was the position of Arthur. 
His kingdom was broken down, his work had failed, but his soul was 
not subdued. Though conquered without, he was conqueror within. 

In the Idylls there is an allegory, but none except those who love 
allegory and hunt for it can find it, for it is hidden under a romantic 
story of human passion and sin. 

As to the meaning of the allegory it will suffice to quote Tennyson's 
own words : 

"Poetry is like shot-silk with many glancing colors. Every reader 
must find his own interpretation according to his ability, and according 
to his sympathy with the poet. The epic of Arthur is the dream of a 
man coming into practical life and ruined by one sin. Birth is a mys- 
tery and death is a mystery, and in the midst lies the tableland of life, 
and its struggles and performances." 

But it is not the allegory which interests us, it is not for the lesson 
that the poem teaches that we love it ; it is for the story of Arthur and 
his work, his early success and his later failure, and the causes of this 
success and failure. 

This story begins with the "Coming of Arthur," the first of the 
Idylls and the prologue to them all. It tells of the coming of the great 
king, his ideals, his threefold purpose of driving out the savage ele- 
ments in his kingdom, of maintaining a high plane of moral life, and 
of maintaining a high plane of spiritual life. To help him carry out 
this purpose he formed his order of the Round Table, and made hii 
knights swear vows of purity, love and truth, — 



The St. Maby's Muse. 25 



" To reverence the King, as if he were 
Their conscience, and their conscience as their King, 
To break the heathen and uphold the Christ, 
To ride abroad redressing human wrongs, 
To speak no slander, no, nor listen to it, 
To honor his own word as if his God's, 
To lead sweet lives in purest chastity, 
To love one maiden only; cleave to her, 
And worship her by years of noble deeds, 
Until they won her." 

Though these vows were impossible for any man to keep, as Merlin 
said, yet the attempt to keep them made the knights stronger and 
braver, made them of one will with Arthur, and so rendered the suc- 
cess of his work more possible. 

But as we find the beginnings of success here, so we find the begin- 
ning of the cause of final failure, the starting of the little rift within 
the lute, that by and by would make all the music mute, and ever widen- 
ing slowly silence all. This was the love of Lancelot, Arthur's most 
honored knight, and Guinevere, the queen, the love which as yet was 
unspoken, which began in the springtime when there was no sin, but 
which should grow stronger with the years until it should work harm 
upon all of the court. But as no man knew it, and not even they 
themselves had confessed it to each other at that time, it did not hinder 
Arthur's work. All was well. Arthur drew in the petty princedoms 
under him, fought and overcame the heathen, made a realm, and 
reigned. 

The Idyll, "Gareth and Lynette," represents a golden time, for the 
knights kept their vows, and were faithful to their king. Gareth was 
Arthur's ideal knight. He was a bold, gay youth, eager to follow the 
king and work out his will, full of hope and courage, to whom nothing 
seemed impossible, and to whom, because he felt thus, success came. 

So in this Idyll all is still well, and in the next two, "The Marriage 
of Geraint" and "Geraint and Enid," there is some goodness and hap- 
piness, though there is a hint of the coming evil. When Geraint, at 
first a brave knight, heard the rumor of the guilty love of the queen for 
Lancelot, 

"Though yet there lived no proof, nor yet was heard, 
"The world's loud whisper breaking into storm," 
4 



26 The St. Maky's Muse. 



he was afraid that his pure wife would be contaminated by the queen, 
and so took her away to his kingdom. There, compassing her with 
sweet observances and never leaving her, he grew forgetful of his vows, 
of his glory and his name, and was molten down into mere uxorious- 
ness, and afterwards became suspicious, jealous and even cruel. 

Thus the little rift was growing wider, the effect of Lancelot's and 
Guinevere's sin was beginning to be felt. Their love not only caused 
Geraint to sin, but the guiltless Enid to suffer. 

In "Balin and Balan," the rift is still wider. It drove another 
knight from the court, drove him to sin and finally to death. Balin, 
after being subdued and made a knight, remained at Arthur's court 
and was beginning to learn gentleness from Arthur and the other 
knights when he heard that Lancelot and the queen were disloyal to 
the king, and angered at this, he took to the wild woods again, his rage 
turning against himself. There he made struggle after struggle with 
himself, until finally his brother heard him, and thinking that he was 
the Demon of the Wood, attacked him. Ignorant of their brotherhood, 
they charged upon each other, and fell, wounded to death. 

The knowledge of the sin which caused Balin's downfall, helped the 
success of Vivien's wicked attempts. 

She, a woman of absolute falsehood and unredeemed meanness, came 
to the court with the belief that not one of the knights was pure and 
good, and with the determination to ruin Arthur's work, and when this 
belief was strengthened by the discovery of sin already in the king's 
presence, the determination grew stronger and bolder. Though she did 
not succeed in leading the king astray, she did spread evil in the court, 
and finally made even the sage insensible to all that was high and 
noble, and forgetful of his use and name and fame. 

In the next Idyll, "Lancelot and Elaine," as in "Geraint and Enid," 

the love of Lancelot and Guinevere caused suffering. Elaine, the lily 

maid of Astolat, loved Lancelot, and in her innocence told him of it, 

but he, because 

" His honor rooted in dishonor stood, 

And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true," 

could not return her love. When she found that her love was hopeless, 
she went to her little tower and there waited for death. So the maiden, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



ignorant of sin, free from guilt, suffered because of the guilt of others, 
died because of their sin. 

In the "Holy Grail" the further effects of this sin and guilt are 
seen. The knights turned from practical goodness and holiness to 
superstition, from the spirituality and holiness that can be found in 
the midst of human life, in the love of men, to an ascetic religion, to a 
search for signs and wonders. All of the knights vowed to live such a 
life and to search for the Holy Grail until they found it, and each one 
started out in hope, but only two realized their hopes. All of the others 
followed wandering fires, and but few of them ever came back to Ar- 
thur's hall. Thus the Round Table was broken up, the kingdom left 
without its defenders, and the few knights who returned were exhausted 
and made reckless by their failure, truth and purity daily lessened, and 
sensuality in swift reaction had full sway. 

And the next Idyll, "Pelleas and Ettarre," represents this sad state 
of the court. Although new knights were made, the old order of peace 
and purity was not restored. 

Times rapidly grew worse, until, in the "Last Tournament," evil is 
at its height. The season in which the last tournament was held was 
that of departing autumn, when the woods were hushed, their music 
was no more, over them hung grey skies, through them blew wet winds. 
Mature reflects the spirit of the poem. The government of the kingdom 
was broken down, there was further social degradation, Arthur discov- 
ered the guilt of Guinevere and sent Lancelot and his kin from the 
kingdom. This Idyll is the introduction theme to the Idylls that fol- 
low, "Guinevere" and "The Passing of Arthur." 

With the Idyll, "Guinevere," the stories of the Round Table, of the 
work the knights had done, and their success and failure, came to an 
end. Guinevere had gone to Almesbury, and thither the king followed 
her, not to urge her crime, but to forgive her. There he left her, and 
she was afterwards, for her good deeds and her pure life, chosen Abbess, 
and 

"there an Abbess lived, 
For three brief years, and there, an Abbess, passed, 
To where beyond these voices there is peace." 

The last days of Lancelot, too, were passed in peace and he died a 
holy man. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 



From the Abbey Arthur went to fight against Modred, one of his 
knights who had set up a new table, framed directly counter to the old 
one. This battle and its consequence, Arthur's death, are told of in the 
last Idyll, "The Passing of Arthur." 

This Idyll is the epilogue just as the first one is the prologue. They 
are the framework in which the others are contained, for they tell of 
the coming- and the going of the great king, whose character and life 
make the existence of all the other characters in the poem. 

In the dim, weird battle of the west, Arthur, after slaying the traitor, 
Modred, and being mortally wounded himself, was borne to the shore 
of the lake by one faithful knight and was taken upon a barge as dark 
as a funeral scarf. Attended by three queens he vanished down the 
long water, he vanished into night, and "the new sun rose bringing the 
new year." 

Thus with his death, his passing, ends the story of the King, of his 
noble attempts, of his seeming failure — seeming because it would ap- 
pear as failure to the world, but not so to those who count as success, 
brave and honest attempts, undestroyed ideals, and hopes for a brighter 
future. It was in such a spirit that Arthur died. His knights had 
broken their- vows, his kingdom had fallen, his threefold purpose had 
failed, and all on account of the disloyalty of his most honored knight, 
of the unfaithfulness of his queen. But eonf routed with such apparent 
failure, he still had his ideals as before, he could still remember that he 
himself had remained blameless, that he had tried, and that he could 
leave his attempts with God and trust to Him to bring about better 
things. In this belief he died, for his last words were: 

" The old order changeth, yielding place to new, 
And God fulfills himself in many ways, 
Lest one good custom should corrupt the world. 
I have lived my life, and that which I have done, 
May He within Himself make pure." 

We read and love the "Idylls of the King" because it tells of human 
beings, their faults, mistakes and failures, as well as their virtues, and 
tells of them in a beautiful way, beautiful in thought and form. 

The thoughts are full of noble teaching, full of imagination and 
fancy and they are clothed in musical verse and flowing language. 
Words and verse express just what the poet wishes. The movement is 



The St. Maky's Muse. 29 



by turns slow and stately, loud and rough, soft and low, rapid and vio- 
lent, just as the thoughts and scenes require. In descriptions of battles 
the clanging and clashing of swords and battle-axes can almost be 
heard ; in forest scene, murmuring of breezes and rippling of waters are 
echoed. 

The poet's "fame may not rest chiefly on the Idylls, but they form 
one of the fairest jewels in the crown that shines with unnumbered 



gems, each with its own glory." 



The 1907 Valedictory. 



LILLIAN HAtTSEE FARMER. 



Reverend Bishops, honorable trustees, classmates and friends: 
At last the longed for moment has come — that moment which brings 
sorrow to our hearts since we must say farewell to our dear Eector and 
School Mother, our classmates and friends — in a word to dear old St. 
Mary's and all the happy associations connected with it. 

To our beloved Rector let us say that it is with sincerest regret that 
we bid him farewell. His life among us here at St. Mary's has been 
an example of noble character and conscientious duty — our adviser in 
times of trouble, our help in time of need. And, since he must leave 
us, how glad we are that we leave with him, our Eector and our friend. 
To our School Mother, always smiling, gentle and kind, shedding her 
pure influence, we bid farewell. 

To the rising Seniors we bid farewell, and we sincerely hope that 
they will use us as poor examples to be improved upon, and that they 
will make Seniors worthy of our Alma Mater. 

And now, dear classmates, never so dear as now, what words can 
express the feelings that arise in us. A feeling of sorrow overwhelms 
us as we realize that we are leaving the Grove, the Chapel and St. 
Mary's. 

Beloved St. Mary's, how great is our debt, 
Thou hast eared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 
Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 

And now to all, farewell ! 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Pre-Commencement News. 



It is with regret that the Muse is issued without the full accounts 
of the social functions of the school held in the weeks preceding the 
close, hut in some way the responsible editors have failed to prepare 
the "copy." While we are glad to publish Miss Harris' account of 
Helen Ball's party, and Miss Calvert's tribute to the success of Miss 
Hull's Orchestra Concert, we regret that no equally good account of 
Heber Birdsong's entertainment of the Seniors in a delightful trip to 
and up the ISTeuse, or Serena Bailey and Marguerite Short's "straw- 
ride" for the Seniors is to be had. 

THE ORCHESTRA CONCERT, MAY 22. 

Unusual interest was manifested/ in the concert given at St. Mary's, 
Wednesday evening, May 22, under Miss Hull's direction. Much of 
it, no doubt, was due to the fact that the concert was given in the new 
Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Auditorium, but not all, for any time 
in the last live years an orchestra concert has been announced at St. 
Mary's, a crowded house has been the result. The reason is not diffi- 
cult to find, for although the orchestra is composed of all grades of 
students, from nearly beginners to accomplished players, the result of 
their playing is an evening of delightful music of a high order, both as 
to reproduction and quality. This is owing to the remarkable gift 
Miss Hull possesses as a conductor. She is a drill master of no mean 
ability to attain such an effect with such material. To attempt such 
an ambitious program and carry it safely through, beginning with 
Mozart and ending with Wagner, also shows what an artistic seme she 
possesses. 

The Orchestra played with excellent shading, attack and ensemble. 
Those numbers of especial interest were the overture to Mozart's first 
opera, "The elopement from the Seraglio," the excerpt from Beet- 
hoven's Ruin of Athens," the orchestra arrangement of Schubert's "Mo- 
ment Musical," and the Tannhauser March of Wagner's. 

Every one sat back to thoroughly enjoy themselves when Miss Hull 
came out as violin soloist in Raff's "Cavatina," with string accompani- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 

ment. Miss Hull is a violinist in the class of violinists who play with 
passionate warmth of tone and makes music that reaches the heart, not 
merely a technical virtuoso, cold and intellectual. Miss Hull, had she 
chosen to become a concert violinist, could easily have won distinction 
in that field. 

The Hiller Concerto for piano, played by Miss Pixley, was the event 
of the evening. It is not often that a school possesses an orchestra 
able to accompany a concerto, such an undertaking it is, but they did 
very creditable work. Miss Pixley won much applause and extrava- 
gant praise by her brilliant performance of this bright and attractive 
work. Miss Pixley possesses a technic that is both beautiful to hear, 
and see, which is not always the case in pianists. 

It is a joy that the Auditorium turned out to be so satisfactory as 
to acoustics. In every respect it seems to be just the building St. 
Mary's needed. I. U. C. 

THE CLASS OF 1907 ENTERTAINED BY MISS BALL. 

On the afternoon of May 15 (?) the Seniors and Certificate pupils 
were delightfully entertained at the home of Helen Ball. 

Great; jars of daisies (the class flower) adorned hall and parlors and 
at once made the guests feel that this was no ordinary affair, but a 
"really-truly" '07 gathering. Soon after our arrival we were each 
given a dainty card, decorated with hand-painted daisies, on which to 
write our answers to questions pertaining to noted writers. Mary 
Spruill received the prize, a beautiful book, and) Helen Strange the 
booby, a bunch of daisies. We were then ushered into the dining- 
room, which was lighted by yellow tapers and decorated even more 
beautifully than the parlors, in the prevailing colors of white and gold. 
Even the refreshments served to carry out the color-scheme, there 
being dainty iced cakes with almond daisies, yellow and white mints, 
etc. After listening to the "Victor" and chatting, we reluctantly de- 
parted and reached St. Mary's just in time for evening roll-call. 

J. P. H. 



32 The St. Maky's Muse. 



Notes of the Faculty— The Old and the New. 



With the close of the session there comes the usual number of 
changes in the list of teachers and officers. The departing go with the 
best wishes of those who have been thrown with them and have known 
them here, the new-comers should feel that they have only to come to 
St. Mary's to be among friends. The vacation season between the go- 
ing and the coming is a sort of "neutral ground," when we feel that 
those of both years belong to us, and we try here to give their friends, 
as fully as is possible in the space available, a little news of each. 

The changes this year are the most noticeable because they mark a 
change of administration. That is chronicled elsewhere. But as they 
say good-bye our thoughts are largely with the DuBoses who, after hav- 
ing had such a prominent part in the life at St. Mary's the past four 
years, now leave the active' work, while giving up none of their interest 
in the progress of the school. After considering many fields in various 
Dioceses, Mr. DuBose decided to take up his pastoral work again in 
the parish at Morganton, K C, with its six surrounding missions, in 
the District of Asheville, where his work was before coming to' St. 
Mary's. The DuBoses were at St. Mary's during June and left for 
Morganton on the first of July— Mr. and Mrs. DuBose, Mrs. Anderson, 
Rainsford, St. Pierre and St. John. Miss Margaret is now in Europe 
and McNeely, Jr., will spend July with a camping party on the eastern 
Carolina coast. 

There will be only slight changes next session in the Academic 
Faculty. Miss Thomas, who is spending the summer with her rela- 
tives in Columbia and Greenville, South Carolina, will again have 
charge of the English. Mr. Stone, who with Mrs. Stone and Flor- 
ence, is spending the vacation in Greensboro, K C, will continue with 
the History and German. Mr. Cruikshank will again direct the work 
m Latin, and Miss Smith will be in charge of the Mathematics. Miss 
Smith is spending the summer at her home at Ravenswood, West 
Virginia. 

Miss Pool will not return to St. Mary's, though she has not as yet 
announced her plans for next year. Her duties as Rector's Assistant 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 

will devolve upon Mrs. Sheib, the incoming Lady-Principal, while the 
French Department will be in charge of Mile. La Loge. Miss Pool 
will be in Raleigh most of the summer, but during July is spending 
some weeks with, friends at Morehead City. She has done a good 
year's service for St. Mary's, and we regret to see her leave the school. 

Miss Brown, who was expected to continue in charge of the Science 
work, assisting in German, resigned shortly before the close of the ses- 
sion, though she, too, has as yet not announced her plans for the future 
and the "whispers" are not reliable. Though she was connected with 
St. Mary's for such a short time as a teacher, she showed herself quite 
up to the high expectations which had been formed of her, and both 
teachers and pupils will regret that she is not longer to continue a mem- 
ber of the faculty. Her department will be temporarily discontinued, 
and Miss Batdorff, with the assistance of the Preparatory School 
teachers, will give the courses in Science. 

The Preparatory Work will be much strengthened. JSTot only has a 
strong teacher been appointed for the purpose of directing the work in 
general, but the scope of the work will be extended and the pupils who 
have sometimes suffered from inadequate preparation for what they 
have undertaken will receive special attention. Miss Russell will be 
in charge, with Miss Spann and a second Assistant, whose name has 
not yet been announced. Miss Spann, at the close of school, went for 
a month's rest to her home in Hendersouville, 1ST. C. She expected 
later to be in Pittsburg, Pa., for a month or two of relief work in a 
Church Orphanage there. 

Miss McKimmon will (D. V.) be on hand in September for her 
47th year at St. Mary's, and her 26th in charge of the Primary De- 
partment. What would St. Mary's be without "Miss Katie"! The 
week after school closed she was in Richmond at the great Confederate 
Reunion, and she spent the rest of July with friends at Wallace, 1ST. C. 
Most of the rest of the summer she expects to be in Fayetteville with 
her sister, Mrs. Hawley. 

Next to the going of the Rector, the most emphatic changes in the 
faculty for 1907-'08 are in the Music Department. There the going 
of Miss Hull and Miss Pixley, after so many years of good teaching 



34 The St. Mary's Muse. 



and good fellowship, will mean much to those who have known them 
and felt them their friends, while Mrs. Irvine, though she had been 
in the school but two years, had done her work and made her impres- 
sion as a friend, as well as earnest worker and talented artist. Mrs. 
Irvine left Commencement Day to keep an engagement in New York, 
where she expected to spend the summer in study and as an accompanist. 
Her address is Care of Mrs. Young-Fulton, 23 Union Square, New 
York City. 

Mrs. Irvine will next year be Director of Music at St. Mary's Hall, 
Burlington, X. J., a school of the first rank. 

Miss Hull and Miss Pixley will spend the next year in study abroad. 
The Trustees voted them a year's leave of absence, and while they pre- 
ferred to go without any obligation to return to St. Mary's, they both 
expect to resume their work here a year hence — a hope that their many 
friends trust much will come to fruition. When school closed Miss 
Pixley went at once to her father's home at Winnsboro, S. C, to spend 
a month with her parents before her long trip. Miss Hull's mother 
joined her at St. Mary's in April and they spent June in Ealeigh, leav- 
ing July 8th for a week in Baltimore before sailing. The party leaves 
Baltimore for Bremen on the 17th. After a month together in Berlin, 
where Miss Pixley will spend the year, Mrs. and Miss Hull will spend 
a fortnight in Dresden and expect to reach Prague in time for Miss 
Hull to begin her study September 1st, Miss Hull will study with 
Prof. Otto Sevcik, considered the greatest living teacher of Violin, 
while Miss Pixley will be a pupil of the world-renowned Burmeister 
in Berlin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent went direct from St. Mary's to their summer- 
home at Lake Maranacock, Maine, where they are enjoying the sum- 
mer rest. Miss Dowd is with her mother at their home in West Ra- 
leigh, where this month she has with her her close friend, Miss Saida 
Hanckel, of Charleston, herself a St. Mary's girl, well-known to many. 
Mr. Vincent will again be the Director of Music, and will be assisted, 
in addition to Mrs. Vincent in Voice and Miss Dowd in Piano, by 
Misses Powell and McQuiston in Piano and Miss Peck in Violin, etc. 
The other special departments, whose teachers also look after their 






The St. Mary's Muse. 35 



special branches in the academic department, are fortunate to keep their 
teachers. Miss Tenner will have charge of the Art work, Miss Cribbs 
of the Elocution, and Miss Lee of the Business School. Most interest 
centers in the establishment of the new department, for St. Mary's is 
at last to give special instruction in Domestic Art and Domestic Sci- 
ence — a department that should mean a great deal in the future develop- 
ment of the school. Miss Fenner, with Miss Margaret DuBose, sailed 
in a party of six, including Mrs. and Miss Carroll of Raleigh, Miss 
Porcher of Columbia and Miss Trenholm of Charleston, on May 24th 
from Philadelphia for Antwerp. They had a very pleasant fourteen- 
day trip, reaching Antwerp on June 6th, where the Carrolls left the 
party, and went directly to Paris. While the others "see the sights," 
Miss Fenner is studying at the Delecluse Academie and the Colorossi 
Academic They will be in Paris something more than six weeks and 
hope to see the "Rhine Country" and a little of England before turning 
their faces homeward. They sail from Liverpool September 9th. 

Miss Cribbs paid a visit to friends in Hendersonville before going 
home, and had such a "royal time" that she is going there again on her 
way back. Meantime she is spending the summer at her home in 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Miss Lee has as yet had no vacation. With Mr. Cruikshank and 
Miss Sutton she is "holding the fort" at St. Mary's, doing her part in 
attending to the myriad of things that are to be done in the summer 
months at a school. 

Miss Walton hurried home to be with her sister, who was ill at their 
home in Morganton. Since then she has been nursing her, but at last 
reports without much improvement. Her many friends will feel deep 
sympathy. Mrs. Turner spent ten days in June at St. Mary's, getting 
things straight and waiting for Miss Jennie Belle's return from the 
Jamestown Exposition. Mrs. Turner's sisters, Mrs. Knox and Miss 
Farmer, of Tuscaloosa, came through Raleigh the week after the session 
closed to take Miss Jennie Belle with them to the Exposition, which 
they all enjoyed greatly. Then, after a day or two here, the party, in- 
cluding Mrs. Turner, left for Atlanta June 12th. 

Fragmentary as they are, these brief notes will allow those who are 
interested to get some slight glimpse at the life this summer of the 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 



teachers and officers of last year. And while it is around them that 
as yet affection chiefly centers, yet perhaps interest goes out even more 
to the new-comers who are to preside at St. Mary's in the next session. 
The new Rector, Mr. Lay, and the new Lady-Principal, Mrs. Sheib, 
are introduced to the St, Mary's public elsewhere in this Muse. There 
is little to add here. St. Mary's is fortunate in having induced them 
to take up the work, but the best proof of what they are will be seen in 
their work. Mrs. Sheib visited Bishop Cheshire and inspected the 
school in April, when she made a very favorable impression on all who 
met her ; she spent Commencement Week and the week following again 
at "Bavenscroft," when the good opinion of her was broadened and 
strengthened ; after September we hope that not only present day "St. 
Maryites" but St. Mary's girls of many days will have the pleasure of 
knowing her at St. Mary's. Mrs. Sheib does not finish her school 
duties in New York until the end of July, and the first of August she 
will come to Baleigh to attend to the matters needing her attention, 
while the first of September will find her ready for regular duty at St. 
Mary's. Mr. Lay had mapped out some special work for the summer 
before accepting the call to St, Mary's, and he and his family will spend 
the vacation at their home in Concord, N. H., taking up their residence 
in the Rectory late in August. Until the arrival of Mr. Lay and Mrs. 
Sheib, Mr. Cruikshank, who was appointed Business Manager of the 
school at the Commencement meeting of the Trustees and again de- 
ferred his year at Columbia University to do what he could for St. 
Mary's at this important period, will be in charge of the general school 
affairs. 

Miss Scharlie Russell, who will direct the Preparatory Work, is 
a friend of Mrs. Sheib, who knew her and worked with her at the 
Louisiana State Normal School at Natchitoches, from which she grad- 
uated. She comes to St. Mary's from New Orleans, where she has 
lately been teaching. 

Miss Ida J. Batdorff, who will organize the work in Domestic Science, 
is a Pennsylvanian and received her high school training at the Leba- 
non (Pa.) High School. After graduating there she continued her 
studies at the Central State Normal School, Lock Haven, Pa., from 
which she also graduated. After several, years teaching she more re- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 37 

cently entered Columbia University, New York City, to specialize in 
Domestic Science, and has recently taken her diploma in that depart- 
ment of Teachers' College. Miss Batdorff has had occasion, in connec- 
tion with her work, to make special study of the allied sciences, and 
she will give the courses in Biology (Science C and D) at St. Mary's 
next session. 

Mile, de Joubert La Loge, who succeeds Miss Pool in charge of the 
French classes, is a native French woman. Mrs. Sheib writes that she 
possesses much personal charm and seems well qualified in all respects 
for the life here. 

Miss Lucile Peck, who takes Miss Hull's place in Violin, Guitar, 
Mandolin, etc., is a Connecticut woman, but comes to St. Mary's from 
Grenada College, Mississippi. She studied with Carl Venth, of Brook- 
lyn, ]SL Y., Samuel J. Leventhal, of Hartford, Conn., and for a short 
time with Daniel Visanska, of Berlin, Germany. For six years she 
taught in her home city, Norwich, and for the past year has been located 
in Mississippi. 

Miss Matta P. Powell, one of the two incoming Piano teachers, is 
a Missourian. She was educated at Central College, Lexington, Mo., 
taking the diploma and doing post-graduate work in Music there. She 
taught for a number of years and spent the winter of 1906 in Chicago 
studying with Emil Liebling. The past season she has been teaching 
as a private instructor. 

Miss Louise McQuiston's home is at Aberdeen, Mississippi. After 
study with private teachers she entered the Cincinnati Conservatory, 
where she did very satisfactory work and received a Teachers' Certifi- 
cate. During last year she gave private lessons in her home town. 
Bishop Bratton, who has known her well since going to his Diocese, 
speaks of her in the highest terms. 

Dr. Augustus W. Knox, of Raleigh, lately appointed School Physi- 
cian, needs no introduction to St. Mary's girls of the past year. He has 
been the physician for many members of the school for years and since 
the illness of Dr. Hines has been usually called in. He now becomes 
the first regular School Physician, and girls of next year who have need 
of his attention will come to count him their friend. Dr. Knox's wife 
was educated at St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management or the 
Mtjse Club.. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 
Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 
Elizabeth Turner Waddill. Eleanor Randolph Wilson. 

Sallie Haywood Battle, Sarah Prince Thomas. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



The Commencement of 1907. 



The June Muse is planned to reach its readers as early as possible 
after the close of the session. In telling of the Co mm encement season 
it aims to bring as well as it can the various scenes of the week to the 
eyes and ears of those daughters and friends of St. Mary's who have 
not been fortunate enough to be able to be present to see and hear in 
person, and to record the events of the week in such form that those who 
have been present may be able to refresh their memories of the happy 
occasions when memory of details tends to grow dim. 

Ordinarily the more promptly the Commencement Muse reaches its 
readers the more it will be enjoyed, and a July account of a May Com- 
mencement seems rather unseasonable and unreasonable, but we feel 
that on this occasion there is a justification for the delay, and trust that 
in this those interested in the Muse will find our excuse. The uncer- 
tainty surrounding the choice of a new Rector and the arrangements 
for the new session which prevailed during Commencement Week, 
though entirely unavoidable, was very unsatisfying and unsatisfactory 
to alumnse, students and authorities alike, and it has seemed wise for 
the Muse to postpone its appearance until it could speak authoritatively 



The St. Maky's Muse. 39 



on these subjects, the subjects of greatest current interest to everyone 
interested in the school. 

After much patient deliberation the Trustees have solved the most 
pressing of the problems of the present in the school and have taken 
action that should result in producing a St. Mary's, even stronger and 
healthier than in the past. Not larger for the present, but looking for- 
ward to a growth in numbers as in force, and ready now to bring about 
the fullest growth in the development of its individual pupils. 

The letter recently mailed from the Business Office of the school to 
pupils, patrons, and friends, and which is reprinted in this number of 
The Muse,, gives a more or less official statement of the outlook. The 
sketches of Mr. Lay and Mrs. Sheib, which accompany it (that of Mr. 
Lay reproduced here, while that of Mrs. Sheib appeared in the May 
Muse), serve as a slight introduction to these individuals who are now 
to have such important parts in the life of the school. Many of those 
who were present at Commencement had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. 
Sheib, who charmed all with whom she was thrown. Mr. Lay, in per- 
son, is as yet a stranger, but aside from his family connections, which 
assure him a warm greeting from St. Mary's daughters, he possesses all 
those qualities so essential for success in the work here, and is said 
to be of rare personal .charm. A southerner by birth and instinct, he 
enjoyed the best of Northern training; a clergyman of power, he made 
teaching his. life-work. Add to this grace and charm of person, and 
what more could be asked to recommend him as a worthy successor to 
the Founder and Rectors of St. Mary's? 

The Muse extends its warmest greetings to the Rector-elect and the 
Lady-Principal-elect, and desires to assure them of its wish to be of 
service to them in their new work for St. Mary's, and its hope is that it 
may be able to contribute something to the success of their plans for 
the advancement of the best interests of the school. 



The Muse Editors. 



With this June number begins the twelfth volume of the monthly 
Muse, and the fourth volume since its revival in 1904. The publica- 
tion has not grown in strength as it should, nor received all the support 



40 The St. Maky's Muse. 



of which its supporters have considered it worthy, but it has made many 
friends, done some little toward furthering the interests of the school 
and in keeping the alumnae, or such part of them as it can reach in 
touch with the school life, and it still clings to the purpose for which 
it was revived. 

A year ago the Senior Class, who had had charge of the publication 
of the monthly as well as the annual Muse, handed over the monthly to 
the Muse Club, while continuing the management of the annual This 
arrangement has proved quite satisfactory and will be continued dur- 
ing the next year. 

The Monthly Board, appointed at the May meeting of the Muse 
Club, and which will take active charge with the October number is 
made up of Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief; Katharine Hen- 
derson, Business Manager; Elizabeth T. Waddill, Senior Editor- 
Eleanor E. Wilson, Literary Editor; Sara Prince Thomas, News Edi- 
tor, and Salhe Haywood Battle, Associate Editor. The Alumnse Edi- 
tor and the Exchange Editor are yet to be appointed. 

Any mention of change in the Muse Board would be both inade- 
quate and ungracious which did not contain a word of appreciation of 
the work of the retiring Editors. Miss Serena Bailey, late Editor-in- 
Chief showed throughout the year great energy in the preparation of 
the Muse, and through her tireless persistence in advancing its inter- 
ests, more than to any other one factor, is the success of the Muse dur- 
ing the year due. As a writer, too, Miss Bailey possesses strength, and 
the Muse will miss her poetry, her stories and her sketches, which have 
done much to strengthen the literary side of both the monthly and the 
annual m the past three years. Another writer of talent in both poetry 
and prose, who has freely used her talents to help the cause of the 
Muhe constantly since its revival, is Miss Helen Katharine Liddell to 
whom the 1907 Muse prize was awarded. Her "Calendar," published 
in the 1907 Annual, was pronounced by Miss Thomas and others one 
of the best pieces of student work written at St. Mary's in late years 
And though it has less glamour, perhaps, after all, the most important 
phase of the work in its bearing on the life of the paper is the business 
side-the question of how the finances are to be raised to run success- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 41 



fully the monthly and the annual, which are financed from a common 
treasury. The chief credit in this department the past year belongs to 
Miss Beatrice Bollmann Cohen, who, as Acting Business Manager dur- 
ing the illness of Miss Harris and after, by her work kept the Muse 
treasury from bankruptcy. To these Editors and to their associates 
in the management, the thanks of all friends of the Muse are due, 
and a hard task confronts the new managers in having to find others 
to take their places. Our best wishes to each of the Editors of 1907 
and our fellows in the Muse Club who leave St. Mary's for the broader 
duties beyond, and may their work for the Muse here tell for them in 
their work hereafter. 

The Class of 1907. 



Though the Graduation Averages of the Class of 19 07 were not an- 
nounced at the recent Commencement, they compare favorably with 
those of preceding classes, showing a general average of 90.32 per cent, 
average courses of 17.2 hours each year, and an average deportment of 
98.5 per cent. Final averages at St. Mary's are at present based on 
the record of the last two years, the Junior and Senior Years. 

The individual standing was : 

1. Lillian Farmer . 97.45 

2. Mary Spruill 93.47 

3. Emily Carrison 93.14 

4. Louise Hill 89 . 95 

5. Sue Prince 89.79 

6. Heber Birdsong . , 89.38 

7. Beatrice Cohen . . 87.76 

8. Helen Ball 87.18 

9. Alice McCullers 84.91 



42 The St. Maky's Muse. 



The Retiring Rector and School Mother. 

The administration of the fourth Rector of St. Mary's is to be judged 
by its results. It is unnecessary for The Muse to add its words of 
appreciation of the work of Mr. and Mrs. DuBose to what has already 
been said, but it is a pleasure to say a little even in a feeble way. None 
of those who have labored for St. Mary's and given freely of their time 
and energy has worked more faithfully for the school than has Mr. 
DuBose. From the moment that he took charge to the last moment of 
his administration he gave every energy to the advancement and up- 
building of St. Mary's. He leaves behind him evidences of his tireless 
zeal here that will live long. Bishop Cheshire's reference to Mr. Du- 
Bose in May, at the Diocesan Convention, is a well deserved tribute, 
which it is pleasant to reprint in The Muse. 

Mrs. DuBose, with her never failing smile and word of cheer has 
been a comfort to many a St. Mary's girl of the past four years at times 
when they needed comfort, and her constant readiness with sympathetic 
word and helping hand has made a lasting impression. 

Bishop Cheshire said in his Report for the Trustees of St, Mary's to 
the Diocesan Convention : 

The Trustees desire to place on record their very high appreciation of the faithful 
services of the Rev. McNeely DuBose, who retires from the Rectorship of St Mary's 
with the close of the present school year. Mr. DuBose feels that his vocation is for 
more exclusively pastoral and priestly work. But he may certainly carry with 
h im , in returning to parochial work, the consciousness of a good work nobly and 
effectively done in building up and advancing this important institution of Christian 
culture. His administration of the School has been marked by most important pro- 
gress and development in the material and business interests of the School, and he 
leaves marks of his work behind him which time shall not soon obliterate The 
Chapel owes very much of what it has become to his zeal and good taste; the steam 
laundry is specially his work, and indeed the whole property speaks of his faithful 
care and watchful interest. The business of the School has been closely looked 
after, and it is believed that its affairs have never been in so thoroughly satisfactory 
condition as they are at this time. 

And in the higher interests of religious culture we feel that we owe very much 
to Mr. DuBose. He has not only made the Chapel beautiful and seemly with its 
appropriate appointments and furniture, but he has done much to add to the rever- 
ence and edifying character of the service therein rendered, and to bring to bear 
upon the School the elevating and stimulating influence of the doctrinal and de- 
votional system of the Church. He has done good work here: we believe he will 
io good work wherever in God's providence he may be called to labor 



The St. Mary's Muse. 43 



Rev. George W. Lay, Rector-elect. 

On the news of the acceptance of Mr. Lay of the call to St. Mary's 
Bishop Cheshire issued the following announcement to the press, in 
which it was published June 17th : 

The Trustees of St. Mary's wish to announce that they have secured 
the Kev. George W. Lay as the successor of the Kev. McNeely DuBose 
in the rectorship of St. Mary's. The school and the community are to 
be congratulated upon the prospect of such an acquisition to the intellec- 
tual and social life of Raleigh. 

Mr. Lay is the second son of that late eminent prelate, the Rt. Rev. 
Henry C. Lay, of the Diocese of Easton, well known both as an author 
and as an eloquent speaker and preacher. Many of our people remem- 
ber the noble sermon preached by Bishop Lay in Christ Church, Raleigh, 
in May, 1881, before the Convention of the Diocese of North Carolina, 
in memory of Bishop Atkinson, then recently deceased. Bishop Lay 
was also the preacher at the consecration of Bishop Lyman, in the same 
church, December 13th, 1873. 

Bishop Lay's wife was a daughter of Mr. Roger Atkinson, Bishop 
Atkinson's elder brother. The Rev. George W. Lay will therefore pos- 
sess by anticipation a place in the confidence and affections of the people 
of the Carolinas, and indeed of the whole South, as the son of Bishop 
Lay and the great-nephew of Bishop Atkinson. 

Mr. Lay was born in 1860 in Huntsville, Alabama, of which his 
father had been rector up to the time of becoming Bishop. It may in- 
terest some persons to know that his god-mother was the author of two 
little books once very popular among members of the Episcopal Church 
in the South, "The Little Episcopalian" and "Bessie Melville." 

Mr. Lay was graduated at Yale College in 1882, and pursued his 
theological studies at the General Theological Seminary in New York 
City. He served for a few years in parishes in Erie, Pa., and in New- 
burgh, N. Y. For nearly twenty years he has been one of the Masters 
in St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire. Under the elder, Dr. 
Coit, St. Paul's School won the place it has ever since maintained among 
the very best boys' schools of America. Trained under the eminent 
heads of this famous school, and by his years of faithful and efficient ser- 



44 The St. Maey's Muse. 



vice, having been himself advanced to a very high and responsible posi- 
tion in the school, Mr. Lay has had the training best calculated to fit 
him for the duties and responsibilities of the head of one of our most 
important schools in the South. In fact, it is reported on reliable infor- 
mation that some years ago, upon the death of the Head Master of St. 
Paul's School, Mr. Lay was, by a number of the under-masters, strongly 
urged as the best man to be put in the Head Master's place. 

Mr. Lay's wife is the daughter of Rear Admiral Balch, of the United 
States Navy, of a good old Maryland and Tennessee family, and will 
furnish the rectory of St. Mary's School with the rich adornment of her 
family of seven little children. 

The people of Ealeigh will give Mr. Lay and his family a warm wel- 
come and trust to see St. Mary's continue to increase in influence and 
usefulness under his able administration. 

In its issue of the same date the News and Observer thus comments 
editorially on affairs at the school: 

In its long and useful career, St. Mary's School has been fortunate in its rectora. 
The Rev. Aldert Smedes and Rev. Bennett Smedes placed the school upon so excel- 
lent a foundation as to make it one of the best schools for the higher education of 
women in the South, and under Bishop Bratton and Dr. McNeely DuBose it has 
continued to grow in numbers and in thoroughness. 

The recent resignation of Dr. DuBose, regretted alike by Trustees, patrons and 
the public, imposed upon the Trustees the duty of selecting a successor. It is 
gratifying to know that in the new rector, Rev. George W. Lay, a gentleman has 
been secured who combines those qualities that are needed in this important position. 
He is a scholar, a teacher of experience, a gentleman of varied culture and accom- 
plishments, a clergyman who will be welcomed both because of his own attainments 
as well as because he is the great-nephew of the beloved Bishop Atkinson, and the 
son of Bishop Lay. 

Bishop Cheshire, whose duties make him the head of the Trustees of St. Mary's, 
thinks that the friends of the School are to be congratulated upon securing Mr. Lay, 
who in all respects is deemed the fit man to succeed the worthy men who have given 
St. Mary's its distinctive position among Southern colleges for women. The high 
opinion in which Bishop Cheshire holds Mr. Lay will be guarantee of his worth and 
fitness. Under him there is every reason to look for the continued enlargement and 
usefulness of this famous old school. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 45 



The Improvements for I907-'08. 



While it would be possible to go into details it may be better to let 
this Muse go to its readers with nothing more in the way of an an- 
nouncement of the improvements than is contained in the circular letter, 
issued lately from the Office, which is re-printed here. 

The "Grill Room/' in the Main Building, opposite the Dining-room 
and the Athletic Field to the rear of the Auditorium, are the features 
that will afford most pleasure to the girls of next year. But the little 
improvements all about will be acceptable. We will "keep" them 
until the next Muse, in late August or early September. 

To the Clergy of the Garolinas, the patrons of the School, past, present and pros- 
pective, the "old girls," and all friends of St. Mary's: 

With the close of the sixty-fifth year of the life of St. Mary's, and the tenth year 
of its existence as the property of the Church, another period in the history of the 
School is rounded out. St. Mary's is now free from debt, the School finances are 
in good shape, and the outlook for the future was never brighter. To quote Bishop 
Cheshire's words at the presentation of the Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Audi- 
torium at the recent Commencement, "This is the beginning of a new stage in the 
progress of St. Mary's School. The first work to be done was to pay for the 
grounds and buildings and to make them in some measure adequate to the purposes 
of the School. It is a significant fact, and one of happy omen, that the money for 
this work has come, not from the few, but from the many; not chiefly from the 
rich, but from hundreds of persons, mostly of small means, in all parts of the Caro- 
linas, and from daughters and friends of St. Mary's beyond our own borders. Our 
foundations are well and solidly laid in the hearts of all our people, rich and poor 
alike." 

After four years of effective work the Kev. McNeely DuBose now retires from the 
Rectorship to resume his active ministry, and a new administration takes up the 
work of St. Mary's to direct the School in its promising new stage of progress — a 
stage of development and expansion. To carry on Yhis work the Trustees have 
placed at the head of St. Mary's the Rev. George W. Lay, late of St. Paul's School, 
Concord, N. H., whose past record is a guarantee of what may be expected for St. 
Mary's under his wise guidance. Associated with him in the management will be 
Mrs. Leonora W. Sheib, late of Teachers' College, Columbia University, N. Y., a 
lady of broad culture and great personal charm, peculiarly fitted by temperment, 
by association, and by experience, to be an ideal lady principal for St. Mary's. 

Mrs. Sheib will have personal charge of the school routine and of the health, com- 
fort and home-training of the girls, who may expect to profit much by association 
with her. 

The Rector and the Lady Principal will be assisted by an able and enlarged corps 



46 • The St. Mary's Muse. 



of teachers and officers, many of them proved by their work in the school in the 
past, and the new-comers promising to lend added strength by their peculiar fitness 
for their several positions. 

Steps are now being taken looking to the enlargement of the school facilities in 
the immediate future by the erection of an additional dormitory and dining-room 
building, and for the creation of an endowment fund. Funds for these purposes must 
be provided, and every friend of St. Mary's is urged to bear these needs of the School 
in mind and to help by word and deed in providing for them. No additional room, 
a pressing need of St. Mary's, will be provided in time for the approaching session, 
but important and decided improvements in the available accommodations, both in 
the Scholastic and Home Departments, have been arranged for. 

Among the more important of these may be mentioned: 

( 1 ) The institution of a course in Home Economics, to develop the important field 
of Domestic Art and Domestic Science, a department of instruction which has a 
distinct place in reaching the ideals for which St. Mary's has always stood — the 
training of the best type of womanhood. 

(2) Improved facilities for Physical Training, including an athletic field. 

( 3 ) The appointment of a thoroughly trained Director of Preparatory Work, who 
will give special attention to those pupils whose preparation for the regular courses 
may be found to be inadequate. 

(4) The appointment of a regular School Physician, with the additional special 
attention to the health of the pupils that is assured by the creation of the office. 

Important improvement in the school accommodations and equipment are also 
being made this summer. 

Owing to the additional space required to make possible these improvements, the 
School will be able to accommodate only 125 boarding pupils during the session of 
1907-08, and as many of these places are already definitely engaged, it is incumbent 
upon us to call the attention of prospective patrons to the need of making immediate 
application if they wish to be sure of securing places. The blanks for this purpose 
may be had by writing to the School. 

Congratulating you on the excellent outlook for our School, thanking you for past 
evidence of interest and appreciation, and asking your full co-operation in the plans 
for the present and future. For the Trustees. 

Sincerely, Ernest Cruikshank, 

Business Manager St. Mary's. 

Mr. Lay will take up the active duties of the Rectorship September 1st. Mrs. 
Sheib may be addressed at the School after August 1st. 



The St. Mary's Muse. . 47 



Notes of the Commencement Season. 



The delay in the publication of this number of The Muse makes 
personal notes out of date, but those who met them here will not soon 
forget the numerous visitors who thronged to the Commencement exer- 
cises, and especially the "old girls/' who came to resume their "school 
day feeling" for a few days. It was especially pleasant to have "Flor- 
ence Thomas," of Charlotte, "Mary Villepigue," of Camden, and "Mar- 
jorie Bobertson," of Columbia, at the school and to have them enter 
heartily into the e very-day school life. 

The annual Muse came from the presses of the Edwards and Brough- 
ton Printing Company a few days before the close and by universal con- 
sent was voted up to expectations. It is a handsome and also a dainty 
volume, dedicated to Miss Lee, Principal of the Business Department, 
"a friend indeed, with all a friend's best virtues shining bright" (as 
the inscription says), is bound in natural ooze stamped in gold, with 
the name and seal, and contains most of the things that students of the 
year will like to remember. The demand for the book was so much 
greater than the supply that, to the regret of the Board, a number had 
to be unsupplied. 

One of the most graceful acts incident to the Commencement was the 
presentation by the Muse Club to Mr. Cruikshank of a gold watch- 
fob, properly inscribed as an evidence of appreciation of his help in 
connection with the production of the Muse. The presentation was 
made at a special meeting of the Club on Tuesday by Miss Serena 
Bailey, the Editor-in-Chief, in a few happy remarks, to which Mr. 
Cruikshank responded in surprise and confusion. The Muse Club had 
a very successful first year and wishes continued success and long life 
for both its "Faculty Director" and itself. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Coramunications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

IMrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Mrs. F. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



Forward, Alumnae! 



Though the Alumnae meeting held at the recent Commencement was 
not much more fully attended or enthusiastic than usual, those who 
were present believe that it as distinctly marked the beginning of a new 
era in the work of the Alumnae as did the whole Commencement in the 
life of the school. 

A well-attended and interesting meeting was held, as is chronicled 
elsewhere, on the afternoon of Wednesday, May 29th, the feature being 
Bishop Bratton's very appropriate remarks. But the importance of j 
the meeting is not to be measured by the exercises, but by the cam- 
paign-notes that were felt rather than actually sounded. For there is 
to be no parade about the alumnae work in the future any more than 
there has been in the past. The St. Mary's Alumnae are ready to let 
their works speak for them, and in their love for St. Mary's is found 
the inspiration for the work. 

As pointed out by Bishop Bratton, the great lasting need of St. Mary's 
is for an adequate endowment. But endowments are usually not got- 
ten in a day, and the first step toward the securing of an endowment is 
the cultivation of the spirit of giving. The greater part of the Alumnae 
are not able to help largely by actual gifts toward the endowment but by 
following Bishop Bratton's advice and "thinking endowment," "talking 
endowment" and "working for endowment," the matter will be brought 
more and more strongly before those who are able to give and the en- 
dowment will surely come. The Alumnae wish to be doers and not 



The St. Maky's Muse. 49 



talkers only, and in order to be themselves doing within their means 
while encouraging others to do what they themselves can not accomplish, 
they will make their third work an undertaking that is distinctly in line 
with the larger endowment plan, that is, the establishment of additional 
endowed alumnae scholarships. 

For one essential feature must be ever borne in mind in connection 
with the Alumnae work. Whatever is done must stand out as empha- 
sizing the strength of the past and applying its lessons to the future. 
With this idea in mind no better object could be found for the Alumnae 
work than those already accomplished: (1) The endowment of the 
Smedes Memorial Scholarship, commending the life and labors of Dr. 
Aldert Smedes, Founder and first Rector; Mrs. Aldert Smedes, his 
wife, and Dr. Bennett Smedes, their son, the second Rector — in whose 
lives is largely summed up the principles which made St, Mary's what 
it is; and (2) The enlarging and adorning of the old Chapel, around 
which center the most hallowed recollections of the past, and which shall 
be the outward expression of the spiritual side of the St. Mary's life 
so long as the work endures. The new undertaking — the raising of 
an endowment fund for The Mary Iredell Scholarship and The Kate 
McKimmon Scholarship — is well worthy to take its place beside the 
other two, for in commemorating the life and works of Mrs. Iredell and 
Miss McKimmon the Alumnae will be honoring those two of its own 
members who of all her daughters have been most prominently iden- 
tified with the life of St. Mary's, and who by their constant devotion 
and untiring work throughout their girlhood and womanhood have done 
more for the school and been more to the Alumnae of all generations 
than any other individuals. 

That this work should be undertaken during the lifetime of these 
two much-loved ladies while unusual is yet eminently fitting, for there 
is too little tendency toward active signs of appreciation for such lives 
before their earthly course is ended. Moreover, a stimulating idea 
runs through the plan, for if the endowment is forthcoming within the 
time allotted, and the Committee confidently expect it to be forthcom- 
ing, the income may be used not in any sense as an adequate "retiring 
fund," but as a slight "annuity of honor" for the individuals whose 



5® The St. Mary's Muse. 



names the funds will bear— an idea which will unquestionably appeal 
to many. "All the honor of a Carnegie Foundation, but unfortu- 
nately lacking the adequate income." 

The Committee's letter will put the matter formally before the Alum- 
nae, and the response should be immediate. In addition to communica- 
tions to Miss McVea or Miss Dowd, The Muse would be glad to have 
any suggestions for publication that might tend to further the purpose. 
The letter is given in full below. E. q 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association, 
Committee on Scholarship Endowment, 

Ealeigh, K C, July 1, 1907. 
Dear Fellow Alumna :— At a meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnae, 
held during the Commencement of 1907, it was decided to undertake, 
as the third special work of the Association, the establishment of two 
additional alumnae scholarships, to be called The Mary Iredell Scholar- 
ship and The Kate McKimmon Scholarship, in honor of two of St. 
Mary's most devoted pupils and teachers, women who have made the 
best interests of the school their life-work. 

The Committee hopes to raise the endowment for these scholarships 
($3,000 each) within the next four years, and asks the co-operation of 
every old St. Mary's girl to this end. 

We are asking for the fund in definite amounts, as follows : 

200 persons to give $ 5.00 (or $ 1.25 a year), making $1,000 

100 persons to give 10.00 (or 2.50 a year), making l,'oOO 

40 persons to give 25.00 (or 6.25 a year), making 1,000 

20 persons to give 50.00 (or 12.50 a year), making 1,000 

10 persons to give 100.00 (or 25.00 a year), making 1,000 

4 persons to give 250.00 (or 62.50 a year), making 1,000 



$6,000 

You will, we are sure, wish to have a part in this movement. Will 

you, then, first, let us know whether you will be one of the 200, the 100, 

the 40, the 20, the 10, or the 4, and, second, will you send us the names 

and addresses of other St. Mary's girls of your town or neighborhood ? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 51 



Contributions should be sent to Miss Dowd, the Treasurer of the 

Association, whose address is West Kaleigh. 

Trusting to you to do your part in co-operating with us in making 

this movement a success, and recalling to you what we have done as a 

measure of what we can do, 

With all good wishes and regards, 

Emilie W. McVea, Chairman. 

Nannie Jones Ashe (Mrs. Thos. Ashe), 

Minnie Tucker Baker (Mrs. Ashby Baker), 

Annie Philips Jackson (Mrs. Herbert Jackson), 

Bessie Smedes Leak (Mrs. M. T. Leak), 

Lucy Garrett Pittenger (Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger), 

Annie Smedes Koot (Mrs. Chas. Koot), 

Daisy Horner Strong (Mrs. R. C. Strong), 

Margaret Busbee Shipp (Mrs. Wm. Shipp), 

Kate D. Cheshire, 

Committee. 



A Home-Coming Next Founders' Day. 



Another suggestion of importance that was discussed informally by 
the Alumnae and which it would be a pleasure to treat of here if space 
would permit, is the appointing of May 12th, the date of the first open- 
ing of St. Mary's for the reception of pupils, as the annual Alumnae 
Day, when the Alumnae should gather in their several tows for local 
reunions and the appointment of delegates to the general reunion at St. 
Mary's at the Commencement season. 

This matter will be discussed thoroughly later, especially in connec- 
tion with the Founders' Day Alumnae Muse, which will be issued later 
in the summer. It is hoped to celebrate the 65th anniversary of St. 
Mary's and the 50th anniversary of the first opening of the Chapel by 
a large Alumnae reunion and appropriate exercises next Founders' 
Day— November 1st— All Saints. Every St, Mary's girl who can ar- 
range to do so should plan to pay the school a visit then. It will be a 



ffciai Mary's School TJbtm 



52 The St. Maey's Muse. 



real home-coming and will afford the opportunity for a full discussion 
of many points of interest to the Alumnae as well as affording all who 
come a chance to see the school in actual operation and to compare the 
St. Mary's of to-day with the St. Mary's that they knew and cherished. 
Come ! 



IN MEMORIAM. 



MRS. MARIA CLARK. BOURNE. 

Entered into the rest of Paradise from her home in Tarboro, June 
4, 1907, Maria Toole Clark, beloved wife of Judge H. C. Bourne, and. 
daughter of the late Gov. H. T. Clark and his wife, Mary Parker 
Clark. Born in Tarboro and reared in their lovely and hospitable 
home, "Hilma," she was loyalty itself to her home, her people, her 
town, her State. Eeceiving her early training from Mrs. General Pen- 
der, in 1876 she came to our Church school of St. Mary's, to whose in- 
terests she was always devoted, and to whose care it was her dearest wish 
to intrust the education of her two daughters. She was a lifelong mem- 
ber of Calvary Church, Tarboro, and a niece of the priest who served 
at its altar fifty years. Having a mother, for whom holy is not too high 
a word, she was brought up "in the nurture and admonition of the 
Lord." She possessed in an extraordinary degree the "charity that 
never faileth, thinketh no evil and hopeth all things." The personifi- 
cation of brightness, the picture of health, fair to behold, and the em- 
bodiment of all that is sweet and gracious in manner, hers was a pres- 
ence whose rare loveliness could be felt by all who came near her. A 
loyal Daughter of the Confederacy, she was President of the Dorsey 
Pender Chapter, and to her untiring efforts is due the beautiful monu- 
ment unveiled there a few years ago. Those who attended her funeral 
must have been impressed by the great love evinced by high and low, 
rich and poor. The Veterans were her honorary pallbearers, and every 
Daughter white-robed, bore Ascension lilies as a tribute to her lore. 
Every one of the large company of friends carried flowers grown in 
their own gardens and arranged by their own hands, and placed by each 
around her grave. Another saint "departed this life in God's faith and 
fear," whose example may we have grace to follow! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 53 



MRS. FANNIE CALDWELL MAIRSTON. 
In the death of Mrs. Fannie Caldwell Hairston, who passed away on 
June 24th at her beautiful country home, "Cooleemee," in Davie 
County, E". C, the State has lost one of its most notable women, and a 
life has closed which from its beginning has been filled with high activi- 
ties and varied interests, with duties faithfully performed, with respon- 
sibilities admirably fulfilled, and with generous, devoted service to God 
and man. 

In her has also departed one of the most typical figures of the old 
social order of the South. To this order she not only belonged by 
birth, by connection stretching back through different lines of distin- 
guished ancestry for a century and a half, but she also belonged to it in 
her character, which in its remarkable strength and force so deeply im- 
pressed every one who came into contact with her, in her lofty standard 
of honor, in her passionate attachment to all fine ideals of noble con- 
duct, in her hand so ready to give, her heart so quick to feel, and in her 
unfaltering devotion to everything which possessed a claim upon her 
loyalty. Far and wide, over this and many other States, are those who 
will feel on hearing of her death that a presence which can never be 
replaced has vanished, a personality with a rare power of inspiring 
strong affection, and an influence which has never been anything but a 
force for good in all the years of her life. 

It has been a long and eventful life since she entered St. Mary's, a 
girl of sixteen, in 1850, but she always looked back upon the years 
which she spent in the school as among the happiest she had known, 
and with characteristic ardor loved everything connected with it, while 
St. Mary's has reason to be proud of her as a striking figure in the 
long line of noble women whom the fine traditions of the school have 
helped to mould and form, to fill worthily whatever places in the world 
they were called to occupy. 

How well she filled hers it is difficult to say in the brief space allowed 
here. Of strong intellectual powers, she had, until the failure of her 
health in these later years, borne a part in the best social life of her 
time, and exercised a hospitality which those who enjoyed it can never 
forget, while her deeds of charity and kindness were so wide embracing 



54 The St. Mary's Muse. 



and so long continued that no memory can hold them all, save only the 
unfailing memory of God. For how truly of her, as of the valiant 
woman of Holy Scripture, it might be said, "She opened her hand to 
the needy, and stretched out her hands to the poor," even a stranger 
might have learned who stood beside her as she lay in the noble serenity 
of death and saw the stream of those whom she had benefited coming 
to take their last look at the friend who had never failed them, and lis- 
tened to the broken words in which they spoke of her goodness' to them. 
It was a tribute as touching as it was beautiful, and well deserved by 
the soul which had so faithfully striven to fulfill the great command- 
ments of love and service, and which had gone to receive the reward 
promised by Him who said, "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least 
of these my brethren, ye have done it unto Me." 

F. C. TlERNAN. 



June Weddings. 



Mrs. Whitmel John Hill 

requests the honor of 

your presence at the marriage of her daughter 

Frances 

to 

Dr. John Lawrence Nicholson 

on the morning of Saturday, the twenty-ninth of June, 

at half after seven o'clock, 

St. Peter's Church, 

Washing-ton, North Carolina. 



STEARNS-FOWLE. 

On the evening of June 1st, at the Chicago Beach Hotel, Chicago, 
111., Miss Mary Haywood Fowle, daughter of the late ex-Governor 
Daniel G. Fowle, of North Carolina, was married to Mr. Walter M. 
Stearns, of Atlanta. Miss Fowle made her home in Ealeigh for a 
number of years. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 5S 



ZEALY-HORTON. 

On the afternoon of Wednesday, June 5th, at 5:30, Miss Julia B. 
Horton and Mr. L. 1ST. Zealey were married in Raleigh at the home of 
Mrs. Everard Baker, on West Edenton street. 

"Miss Julia" has been for many years the friend of St. Mary's girls 
who visit "Wharton's," and they now extend to her their best wishes for 
a long and happy married life. 

Mrs. Charles G. Latta 
requests the honor of your presence 
at the marriage of her daughter, 
Lena Lee, 
to 
Mr. Talbot Murray Allen, 
on Thursday, the sixth of June, 
nineteen hundred and seven, 
at noon, 
The Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 
Miss Latta is an attractive and cultured young woman, and is greatly admired 
by a large circle of friends because of her many charming personal qualities. Mr. 
Allen is one of Raleigh's progressive young men, a practicing attorney of ability, 
popular in a large degree. 

EMERSON-CLARK. 

A wedding in which St. Mary's is much interested, both through the 
principals and attendants, and their family connections, was that of 
Miss Laura Placide Clark, daughter of Capt. and Mrs. Haywood Clark, 
of Wilmington, and Mr. Horace Mann Emerson, son of the late Mr. 
Horace M. Emerson, of the same city, which was celebrated at the 
residence of the bride's parents by Rev. R, W. Hogue on the afternoon 
of June 12th. 

Owing to a recent death in the family of the bride the ceremony was quiet, but 
withal charming for its simple elegance and beauty of environment. Miss Mary 
Clark sister of the bride, was maid of honor, while the bridesmaids were Miss Ehse 



56 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Emerson, sister of the groom, and Miss Helen Clark, a sister of the bride. The 
groom was attended as best man by his brother, Mr. William P. Emerson. Among 
the wedding guests who took a part in the service were former friends at St. Mary's, 
as follows: Misses Florence Thomas, of Charlotte; Anna Clark, of Scotland Neck; 
Mary Graves, of Chapel Hill; Marion Nelson, of Petersburg, Va.; Mamie Bryan, 
of Tarboro; Margie Staton, of Norfolk, Va.; Jane Iredell Green, Alice Davis, Janie 
and Mamie Emerson and Edith Clark, of Wilmington. Mr. and Mrs. Emerson left 
last evening for a bridal tour North. They will return in about two weeks and 
will be at home in East Wilmington, where the groom has recently embarked in 
truck growing. 



PEMBEETOJST-BEOADFOOT. 



St. Mary's Alumnae will recognize the names of friends in the ac- 
count of the marriage of Miss Mary Norcott Broadfoot and Mr. Clar- 
ence Lilly Pemberton, which was celebrated in Fayetteville on the even- 
ing of June 12th. The Muse again extends congratulations. 

Wednesday evening at 8:30 o'clock an impressive and beautiful marriage and 
wedding reception took place, the Rector, Rev. I. W. Hughes, in St. John's Episcopal 
Church, uniting Mr. Clarence Lilly Pemberton, Secretary and Treasurer of the 
McNeill Manufacturing Company, and Miss Mary Norcott Broadfoot, eldest daughter 
of Major and Mrs. John Brackett Broadfoot, of this city, much admired and 
esteemed by many friends. 

In its pretty style, it was a "rainbow wedding," the flowers and dresses of the 
maids of honor and bridesmaids contrasting and blending with their movements 
with striking effect. The maids of honor were Misses Frances Bryan Broadfoot and 
Margaret Bridgers, of Wilmington. The bridesmaids were Miss Jean Pemberton, 
Miss Caro L. Gray, of Raleigh, and Miss Frances R. Broadfoot. 






READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Musb, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 

St. Mary's Seal Pins, 

St, Mary's Pennants, 

St. Mary's Calendars, 

May be had by writing to The Muse. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OE ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES EDTE SHOES 5™ SLIPPERS 



...Send to... 

ALFRED WILLIAMS X GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sellonly the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



Copies of the Alumnae Edition of the monthly Muse, containing 
reminiscent sketches of the St, Mary's of the past, will be mailed to 
Alumnae on request. 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N, O, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Capacity, 60,000 feet per day. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Ralei gh, N. C. 

H.ST E I N M E T Z , 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds ' 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

ROOT. HMPSOft^KSffiBBU 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forme. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Gompany 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 



'The Little Store.' 



I. C. STRONACH'S SOI CO. 



GROCE 



216 FATETTEVILLE STREET 



KING-CROWELJVS DRUG STORE 

AND SODA. FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



With this number the fourth year of the publication of The Muse 
under its present policy begins. The publishers would appreciate a 
remittance of subscriptions from those subscribers who have not yet 
sent the dollar. 

Bound copies of Volume XI of The Muse may be obtained from 
the publishers by anyone wishing a copy as a souvenir of the year. 
Price: $1.50. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVIIVLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



M. ROSENTHAL 

HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



The School Authorities will be glad to mail on request the current St. 
Mary's Bulletins, with full information about the school. 
Bulletin 8, General Information (Catalogue). 
Bulletin 5, Academic Courses. 
Bulletin 3, Scholarships. 
Bulletin 7, Historical Sketch. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



BARRETT & THOMPSON, 

Architects and Engineeks, 

raleigh, n. c. 

PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, n. C. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital $15,000 Surplus 850,000. Deposits over 
8750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. m. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE~ 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 
107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST GO., 

RALEIGH. N. C. 

Safetv, Courtesy and Accommodation to 
Patrons. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 

W. N. Jones. Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Timbeblake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. 0.— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 



ARTISTIC FURNITURE. 
We make a specialty of odd pieces in 

ANTIQUE AND MODEBN DESIGNS. 

Call and see us. 

ROYALL & B0BDEN FURNITURE Co , 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., 
Raleigh, N C. 



HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Fob Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 

11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 

"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 



PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleig h, N. C. 

" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

.Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Db. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Gbocees. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100,000.00 

100.000.00 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




Db. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
|Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Gbocebies, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 



The Faculty and Officers of St. Mary's, 
1907-1908. 



Eev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector< 

Mrs. EDWARD E. SHEIB Lady Principal. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary. 

The Academic Department. 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Bible, Ethics and Greek. 

A. B. , Yale, 1882; B. D. , General Theological Seminary, 1885; Master in St. 
Paul's School, Concord, N. H. , 1888-1907. 

Mrs. EDWARD E. SHEIB Psychology. 

Diploma, Teacher's College, Columbia University, N. Y. ; B. S. , 
Columbia University, N. Y. 

ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature. 

A.M., College for Women (S.C.,) 1900; graduate student, Columbia Uni- 
versity, N. Y., 1905. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1900-04, 1906— 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German. 

A. B. , Harvard, 1882. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1904- 
ERNEST CRUIKSHANK La tin. 

A. B., Washington College (Md.), 1897; A.M , 1898; graduate student John 
Hopkins, 1900. Instructor in St. Mary's 1904. 

ADA B. SMITH Mathematics. 

A.B. , Randolph Macon, 1904. Instructor in St. Mary's, 1907— 

Mlle. de JOUBERT La LOGE French. 

Brevet Superieure, Paris. 

IDA J. BATDORFF Biology and Domestic Science. 

Diploma, Teachers' College, Columbia University, N. Y. 

YANITA CRIBBS Expression and Physical Culture. 

Tuscaloosa College; University of Alabama. Instructor in St. Mary's 1906- 

SCHARLIE E. RUSSELL Director of Preparatory Work. 

Graduate State Normal School, Natchitoches, La. 

MARY E. SPANN Assistant in Preparatory School. 

Graduate Peabody Normal College. Assistant in St. Mary's, 1907— 

KATE McKIMMON Primary School. 

Student and teacher at St. Mary's since 1861. 



Fine Arts Department. 
ALMON W. VINCENT, Director of Music, Piano, Organ, Theory. 
Pupil of Emery, Lang, Whiting, Weidenbach, Jadassohn, and Reinecke 
graduate of Royal Conservatory, Leipzig; director, Mt, Allison Con- 
servatory (Canada), National Park Seminary, Washington, D. C., West- 
minster College, (Pa. , ) etc. 

MARTHA A. DOWD Piano, Elementary Theory. 

Graduate of St.Mary's; pupil of Kursteiner,Sophus Wiig. 

Mrs. MARIE AGNES VINCENT Vocal Culture 

Student Cincinnati College of Music; pupil of Tecla Vigna, Lino Mat- 
tiolo, Emilio Belari, and of Sbriglia, Paris. Teacher Mt. Alison Con- 
servatory, National Park Seminary, etc. 

MATTA P. POWELL pian0 - 

Pupil of Dauer, Cincinnati, and Liebling, Chicago. 

MARIE LOUISE McQUISTON Piano. 

Certificate pupil, Cincinnati Conservatory. 

LUCILE PECK Violin, Mandolin, Guitar, etc. 

Pupil of Carl Venth, Leventhal and Daniel Visanska. 

CLARA I. FENNER Art - 

Graduate Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design; special student, 
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn; special student in Paris. 

YANITA CRIBBS Expression. 

(University of Alabama.) 

Commercial Department. 

LIZZIE H. LEE Director. 

Head of the Business Department since 1896. 

JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant. 



Officers. 
Rev. GEORGE W. LAY Rector. 

Mrs. EDWARD E. SHEIB Lady Principal. 

Miss IDA J. BATDORFE Supervising Matron. 

Mrs. K. M. TURNER Housekeeper. 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of the Infirmary. 

Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician. 

Mrs. MARY IREDELL Visitor. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Business Manager. 

Miss LIZZIE H. LEE Bookkeeper. 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer. 



1906. 



moOL: 



Faculty. 



Twenty-eight 
iout slight 



RECTOR. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

OPENING NUMBER. 



Vol. XII. October, 1907. No. 2. 



God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray thee, this School with 
thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with the light of the 
everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; increase in us true 
religion ; nourish us with all goodness ; and of thy great mercy keep us in the same, 
blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the Son together, we worship and 
glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



The Sixty-fifth Opening. 



On Thursday, September 19th, at ten thirty, the sixty-fifth session 
of St. Mary's formally opened with service in the chapel. 

In addition to the faculty and almost all of the girls, there were pres- 
ent some of the clerical members of the convocation then meeting in 
Raleigh. There was the usual morning prayer, and Bishop Cheshire 
made the address of welcome this year not only to teachers and pupils, 
old and new, but especially to our new rector. He spoke of how abun- 
dantly the four former rectors of St, Mary's had labored for the school, 
and of Mr. Lay's successful work elsewhere. Then at the Bishop's 
request, the Bev. Mr. Meade said a few words of welcome to Mr. Lay 
in the name of the clergy of North Carolina. Mr. Lay responded 
briefly. 

After service, the usual business attending the opening was resumed, 
and for the rest of the day and the two following, registration, the stand- 
ing of the "English tests," classification, and the obtaining and signing 
of matriculation cards went on steadily. But such official duties were 
a small part of the occupation of the girls, their time being largely taken 
up with the arrangement of room or alcove and the renewal of old 
friendships or the forming of new, while the old girls had an additional 
source of entertainment in finding out what changes and improvements 
had taken place during the summer. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Yet to us all, as at former openings, but more than usual this year, 
the greatest change was in the faces we saw around us, so many familiar 
ones gone and new ones come. Of the old, we think with regret and 
love, but to the new — our rector and his wife, our principal, our new 
teachers and pupils — we give greeting and heartiest welcome. 



St. Mary's — My Arrival and Departure. 



(It will not be difficult for those who have known her the past three years to 
recognize this article as the work of Helen Strange, whose place with us is now vacant, 
and who is now enjoying life elsewhere to our loss. It is printed here however merely 
in hope that it may afford a bit of cheer to "ye homesick one" of the present and to 
encourage her to "see light ahead.") 

There are two ways of looking at everything, I've been told, and 
though I believe there are many exceptions to this rule, I think it is 
true of the ways in which I've looked at St. Mary's : that is, the way I 
looked at it on the night of my arrival three years ago, and the way I 
looked at it to-day, when for the last time as a school-girl, I drove out 
of the Grove. 

Long ago, as we rolled up Hillsboro Street, I stretched my neck out 
of the carriage window and stared into the mysterious blackness, which 
a distant flood of light from all the windows of St. Mary's seemed to 
make more oppressive. I thought I was going to suffocate as we came 
closer and closer, and the full glare of light was worse than the darkness. 
All too soon the carriage came to a stand-still in front of the Main 
Building and I grew rather choky and huddled against my father. 
Countless heads bobbed out of the windows and a myriad of eyes were 
turned upon us. As we went up the steps I saw, through the mass of 
heads in the windows to the right, a room full of girls, dancing in be- 
wildering haste. Just then several couples left off and rushed out on the 
porch, and I was hugged breathlessly, dashed through an introduction, 
to some thirty girls and told to "come on and see how grand the room 
looks." 

Vaguely I felt my father kissing me, but before I could secure him 
he had disappeared, so I moved on between my muslin clad, chattering 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



room-mates-to-be, feeling very dusty and curious. "Isn't it simply 
great ? and we've got more Turkish trophies — look out ! you're sitting on 
the cake." 

I immediately left off sitting on the cake, which, by the way, was 
secluded under a mound of pillows ; and tried to look entirely at home 
and to discover the charms of the perfectly bare room. I thought maybe 
they were joking, but I'd been told whatever happened, never to be 
"fresh," so I simply said, "Yes, it's lovely," and wondered to myself 
why all the furniture should be in a clump in the middle of the floor, 
and how we were to sleep on bare mattresses. This latter fear was soon 
allayed, for one of my roommates began : "You see, we didn't have time 
to make up beds after we did all the rest," (the "rest" consisted in 
opening the trunks and rooting out the cake) "so we might as well do it 
now, then we can go dance. Here, kid, take these sheets; don't guess 
your trunks will get up to-night." I grasped the bed linen thrown at 
me and approached the bed pointed out. This was a horrible ordeal! 
I'd meant to practice bed-making before leaving home, but somehow I'd 
forgotten to. I hoped my ignorance was not being laid bare before 
these girls and under cover of the continuous conversation that they 
kept up I trotted from one side of that bed to the other, trying to pull 
the sheet smooth. I thought I was progressing neatly when I heard a 
snicker behind me followed by convulsive giggles. Then I was pushed 
aside and told to cut the cake, I'd find a shoe-horn on the dresser. I 
seemed to take to shoe-horning cake less awkwardly, and by the time 
the others had finished my bed, I had two nice chunks ready for them. 
I was very grateful to them for making my bed and overcome with ad- 
miration at the rapidity with which they had accomplished it, Later 
on my gratitude and admiration sunk very low, for "Pie-beds," it is 
needless to say to those who've had experience, deserve neither. But 
my room-mates didn't seem to resent any lack of thanks in the least. 
Late into the night my meditations as to how long it would be before 
I could leave this big, bare place and be home again were interrupted 
by spasmodic chuckles and shrieks from the other beds. 

And that was three years ago ! Three years is quite a long time but 
everything looked so different this morning, it doesn't seem as if it 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



could have been the same place. Perhaps it was because long ago I saw 
it at night and to-day in the morning sunshine. But I hardly think 
so. It was not the sunlight or the flowers that made the place so lovely. 
I can't tell exactly what it was. But as I stood on the carriage 
step, clinging in a lasting good-bye to those same room-mates who had 
shown themselves such expert makers of Pie-beds that first night, all of 
us suffering a mutual case of suffocation, I forgot all about the joy of 
going home and of being free. I just wanted to stumble up those old 
Main Building steps, late to roll-call, and once more to accomplish the 
feat of plunging in the schoolroom, just as my name was called. I 
would have endured the agony of not getting any mail, and delightedly 
have gotten into line for chapel and progressed funereally out again. 

Walking hour seemed a pleasure; I would willingly have walked 
round and round that grove until I was dizzy ! 

And oh ! for the joy of dancing once more on the parlor floor — to be 
once more a man ! 

If I might again brave Miss and rush spasmodically up and 

down East Rock Hall in order to get the ice out of the cooler for lemon- 
ade or some such refreshment! 

Once more to be awaked by the dulcet tones of a A's and M's" in a 
well-meant serenade ! 

In drowning, it is said a man's whole life flashes before his eyes. So 
at leaving did the life at St. Mary's whirl before me, and I looked with 
envy on those younger ones who would return to do as I was wont to 
do. 

But Raleigh hackmen are not given to indulging sentiment, so I was 
forced to wrench myself from my room-mates and with a last desperate 
good-bye to the crowd of girls, every one of whom I had been thrown 
with in one way or another, I was gone from St. Mary's. 

The Girls of 190T-08. 



It takes some little time to get acquainted with the many new faces 
that greet us at the beginning of each new session, and even while we 
come quickly to recognize fellow-spirits and prospective friends the 
names and home-places of many of our schoolmates are unfamiliar to 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



most of us for at least some weeks, though, we like to know each other. 
This will be our excuse to our schoolmate readers of The Muse for the 
list that follows, while we are sure no excuse is necessary to the friends 
of The Muse outside the school, as they will doubtless get more news 
from the names they see or fail to see in the list than could be given 
them in any other way in a similar space. For there are always unex- 
pected changes at the last, and not all are with us whom we had hoped 
to greet, while some have come back to their studies who had hardly 
expected to go on with them here. We miss the missing, and the pres- 
ence of the unexpected is a pleasure to us as well as to them. 

We give, then, for the benefit of their friends, the list of St. Mary's 
girls of the year, omitting the Raleigh names : 

Bessie Wilson Arthur Union > S - C - 

Elizabeth Dancy Battle Tarboro, N. C. 

Sallie Haywood Battle Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Florence Marie Beckwith Jacksonville, Fla. 

Coates Benedict Athens ' Ga " 

Bonner Washington, N. C. 



Borden Goldsboro, N. C. 



Mary Virginia 
Mildred _ 

Frances Ranney Bottum Greenville, S. C. 

Mary Parker Bourne Tarboro, N. C. 

Meta C. Boykin B °y kin > & 0. 

Sarah Hamilton Boykin Boykin, S. C. 

Frances Bryan Broadfoot Fayetteville, N. C. 

Lee Moye Brown Greenville, N. C. 

Marjorie Brown Atlanta ' G *' 

Laura Maud Bunn R° ck y Mount, N. C. 

Mary Delamar Burbank Wilmington, N. C. 

Emilie Campbell Asheville, N. C. 

Nannie Bryan Campbell Fayetteville, N. C. 

Hallie Jordan Carrison Camden, S. C. 

Constance Helen Cavell Lake Clt ?' Ma ' 

Helen Blair Daniel Philadelphia, Pa. 

Adele Caldwell Davidson Uniontown, Ala. 

Augusta Pendleton Divine *t°cky Mount, N. C. 

Elizabeth McDonald Dixon Edenton, N. C. 

Frances LeGrand Dockery Rockingham, N. C. 

Janie Porcher DuBose Columbia, S. C. 

Ellen Kollock Duvall Cheraw ' S - G ' 

Florence Estelle Egerton Hendersonville, N. C. 

Dorothy Eldredge Camden, S. C. 

Lovina Theodora Eldredge Camden, S. C. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Bessie Smedes Erwin West Durham, N. C. 

Margaret Locke Erwin West Durham, N. C. 

Lena Payne Everett Rockingham, N. C. 

Cornelia Evelyn Eairley Monroe, N. C. 

Sarah Glen Fairley Rockingham, N. C. 

Katharine Clifton Fairley Rockingham, N. C. 

Martha Gregory Ferebee Oxford N. C. 

Vernon Hope Fountain Leggett, N. C. 

Martha Dent Francis Atlanta, Ga. 

Inez Frazer Charleston, S. C. 

Josephine Richards Gilmer Waynesville, N. C. 

Mary Pender Gladstone Hamilton, N. C. 

Lettie Carmalt Grimes Salisbury, N. C. 

Annie Lyman Grimsley Greensboro, N. C. 

Marguerite Halbin Buffalo, N. Y. 

Georgia Stanton Hales Wilson N. C. 

Isabel A. Hanna Baltimore, Md. 

Marie Louise Hardin Gastonia, N. C. 

Wilhelmina Harlow Wilmington, N. C. 

Margaret C. Haughton Charlotte, N. C. 

Matilda Bradford Haughton , Washington, N. C. 

Susie Eaton Hayes Louisburg, N. C. 

Minnie Templet Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Paula Elizabeth Hazard Georgetown, S. C. 

Katharine Mary Henderson Asheville N. C. 

Nellie Hendricks Marshall, N. 3. 

Isabel Heyward Pineora, Ga. 

Mary Barksdale Heyward Atlanta, Ga. 

Alice Leigh Hines Kinston, N. C. 

Sarah Vernon Hollaway Enfield N. C. 

Mary Winder Hughes New Bern, N. C. 

Helen Wilcox Hunter Portsmouth, Va. 

Margaret Johnson Florence, S. C. 

Mary Crawford Jones Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Lila Cutlar Justice Greensboro, N. C. 

Nellie Best Kintner Buffalo N. Y. 

Mary Eloise Kipps Edenton, N. C. 

Derryle Elizabeth Law Washington, D. C. 

Minnie Leary Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Marguerite LeCron Baltimore, Md. 

Mary Norman Leland Rockingham, N. C. 

Suma Bogle Little Blowing Rock, N. C. 

Cornelia Frances Loomis Muskegon, Mich. 

Ruth Mardre Windsor, N. C. 

Julia Louise Mclntyre Mullins, S. C. 

Laura Meares Asheville, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Sallie Elsie Moore Wilson, N. C. 

Pattie Louise Moore Edenton, N. 0. 

Eliza Ward Morton Wilmington, N. C. 

Margaret Atwater Nelson Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Ruth Vernon Newbold Hertford, N. C. 

Passie May Ottley Atlanta, Ga. 

Kathryn Baird Overman Salisbury, N. C. 

Caroline Ashe Parker Monroe, N. C. 

Margaret Cordon Pennington Tarboro, N. C. 

Luciana Cutlar Poisson Wilmington, N. C. 

Annie Ihrie Pou Smithneld, N. C. 

Virginia Splden Prettyman Marion, S. C. 

Helen Mar Quinerly Ayden, N. C. 

Helen Blair Rawlings Wilson, N. C. 

Esther Goudine Rembert Rembert, S. C. 

Eloise Robinson Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Eva Rogerson Edenton, N. C. 

Ida Jean Rogerson Edenton, N. C. 

Nora Belle Rosser Atlanta, Ga. 

Pauline Roughton Macon ' Ga ' 

Ila Adele Rountree Wilmington, N. C. 

Carolista Cabell Sandford Portsmouth, Va. 

Irene Searle Creighton, Ga. 

Frankie Lenore Self Hickory, N. C. 

Rebecca Hill Shields Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Mary Campbell Shuford Hickory, N. C. 

Janie Ruffin Sims Maxwelton, Va. 

Penelope Siade Columbus, Ga. 

Elizabeth Woodard Smith Goldsboro, N. C. 

Irene A. Smith Williamston, N. C. 

Grace Inloes Snow Hillsboro, N. C. 

Martha Byrd Spruiil Louisburg, N. C. 

Jane Hildenbrand Stillman Pensacola, Fla. 

Helen Wilmer Stone New Orleans, La. 

Pauline Beatrice Sumter Sumter, S. C. 

Lula Tucker Taliaferro Charlotte, N. C. 

Mary Augusta Tankard Washington, N. C. 

Lily Edmonston Taylor Wilmington, N. C. 

Sarah Prince Thomas Charlotte, N. C. 

Marguerite Vertner Thompson Baltimore, Md. 

Jennie Belle Turner Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Grace Martin Ward. . Franklinton, N. C. 

Sophie Waddell Watters Jacksonville, Fla. 

Carile Roselle Weaver Pompton Lakes, N. J. 

Mary Alice Wells Columbia, S. C. 

Emma Rochelle Williams Jacksonville, Fla. 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Kate Murehison Williams Florence, S. C. 

Margaret Robinson Williams Jacksonville, Fla. 

Eleanor W. Wilson Princeton, N. J. 

Rebecca B. Wood Edenton, N. C. 

Rebecca Cameron Wood Edenton, N. C. 

Eugenia Dale Woodruff Wilmington, N. C. 

Anna Ells Wootten Wilmington, N. C. 

Lillian Jones Yates Camden, S. C. 

Lucia Gibbon Yates Camden, S. C. 

As the old girl reads new names among,- those she knows so well her 
thoughts naturally turn to those to whose places these "new girls" have 
fallen heir, for once more "every place is filled" and the new girl only 
gets the chance to appear as an "old girl" accommodatingly makes way 
for her. She will doubtless think first of the graduates who, when 
she said her farewell to them last May, were in a blissful state of uncer- 
tainty about their future plans. The Muse is, of course, supposed to 
supply all information about them and all the host of St. Mary's girls, 
though its sources of information are not as many or as broad as they 
should be. Happily most of the '07 girls have allowed The Muse to 
keep up with them. The majority of the class seem unwilling to yet 
end their school-days, and so are devoting themselves this year to learn- 
ing how it feels to be a teacher. Lillian Farmer is teaching at McClel- 
lansville, S. C. ; Beatrice Cohen near Timmonsville, S. C. ; Louise Hill 
near Asheville ; Mary Spruill at Youngsville, K C. ; Alice McCullers 
near her home at McCullers, 1ST. C. ; and Heber Birdsong in the Ealeigh 
Schools. Emily Garrison is spending some time in Columbia, S. C, 
with her uncle's family, and is studying in the city, while Helen 
Ball has taken up a business life with her father in the J. G. Ball Co. 
Some of the girls had pleasant visits to Jamestown — Heber Birdsong 
was there much of the summer — and Emily Garrison traveled westward 
in August and spent the month with relatives in St. Louis. Beatrice 
Cohen's eyes continued to give her trouble, and in September she was in 
Baltimore to have them treated. 

Sue Prince, Marguerite Short and Sarah Jones are representing St. 
Mary's in the Washington Schools this year, doubtless with others of 
previous years, of whom we have not yet heard this session. 

Marguerite Short and Sarah Jones are at Fairmount, and Sue Prince 
at G-unston. Emmie Drewry, who has been at Gunston for several 



The St. Mae> s Muse. 



years, finished there last spring, and she, as well as Josephine Boylan, 
who last year was in Washington, is at home this winter. Helen Strange 
has been visiting her uncle in Lawrenceville, Va., and it is said will 
later honor St. Mary's with her presence. 

Serena Bailey, after being with her mother during June in Richmond 
and Raleigh, returned with her to their home in Palatka in July, and is 
still in Florida, keeping in touch with St. Mary's by letter. Helen Lid- 
dell is enjoying the comforts of home-life in Charlotte, and is devoting 
the energy she put into The Muse last year studying and teaching 
kindergarten and keeping up her music, the study of which she is con- 
tinuing at Elizabeth College. 

Of those who are unexpectedly not with us none is more missed than 
Elizabeth Waddill. After the death of her mother, in August, she 
went to Newark, N. J., to visit her aunt, and her physician there felt 
that she should spend the year under his care. She is attending school 
in Newark and keeping up with her class at St. Mary's, and hopes to 
return in the spring and graduate with her class. 

Phyllis Hickson, too, was called away at the last moment, and is con- 
tinuing her studies at Newcomb College, New Orleans, instead of at 
St. Mary's, to the regret of her many friends here. She is with her 
uncle's family in New Orleans. 

Manie Leake Parsons is at Converse ; Emily Smith, whose family 
is now living in New York, has entered Barnard ; Mary Vann has gone 
with her family to Charlotte and is at Elizabeth College, but most of 
the other girls of last year who have failed to return are at their homes, 
temporarily or permanently out of school. 

Many of the new girls were linked to St. Mary's by associations long 
before they were ready to enter, and are now but beginning on a course 
they have looked forward to for years. To give but a few instances: 
Mary Bourne is the daughter of Mrs. H. C. Bourne (Maria Toole 
Clark), a St. Mary's girl of the '70's, a sketch of whose life appeared 
in the June Muse. Frances ("Bonnie") Broadfoot is a younger sister 
of Mary Norcott Broadfoot, now Mrs. Clarence Pemberton. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = 0rie Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumna;, under the editorial management of the 

Muse Club. 



Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Correspondence from friends solicited. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 
Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 
Eva Rogerson. Eleanor Randolph Wilson. 

Minnie Leary. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, Sarah Prince Thomas. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



With this issue of The Muse the new editors take active charge. We 
extend a hearty welcome to both the old and the new girls and we hope 
The Muse will be a pleasure to them this year. Our plea this month 
is to both our old subscribers and to the new girls who have not sub- 
scribed. We shall in general follow the policy of last year, i. e., we 
shall try to make The Muse a school paper and not a literary magazine. 
We want all the girls to subscribe as well as contribute as much as 
thev can. 



To the Alumnae we say that as The Muse is primarily for them we 
hope they will enjoy it. Each alumna can help us not only by sub- 
scribing but also by sending us any little item of news that she thinks 
would interest anv other alumna. 



The old girls have found much pleasure in noting the many improve- 
ments that have been made during the past summer. Most of us read in 
the June Muse about the grill room but the parlor was a surprise to all 
of us. The old girls would not recognize it with its handsome druggets, 
its beautiful mission furniture and the new curtains. There are many 
other improvements but we will not mention them hoping the old girls 
will come back to see for themselves. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

As Elizabeth Waddill could not come back this year we have found it 
necessary to change the board of editors somewhat. Eva Rogerson and 
Minnie Leary have been made Associate Editors and Paula Hazard is 
Assistant Business Manager. 

The Muse Club has been reorganized with Frankie Self as Secretary 
and the monthly Muse will be its special work again this year. 



In another part of The Muse there is a short account of the changes 
that were made in the laws of the two societies. This year both societies 
will be much larger than they were last year and as the Epsilon Alpha Pi 
has abolished the ninety per cent, average there will of course be more 
rivalry between the two and also more society spirit. Let us see if we 
cannot make the societies a great help to all members and a prominent 
feature of school life. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 

Sarah Prince Thomas, Editor. 
The Literary Societies. 



On the night of September 21st Miss Thomas called a meeting of the 
Literary Societies, the Epsilon Alpha Pi and the Sigma Lambda, to de- 
cide by what rules the Societies should be governed during the ensuing 
year in regard to the admission of new members. After much discus- 
sion it was suggested and decided that the E. A. P.'s should abolish the 
ninety per cent average and that preparatory as well as college students 
should be admitted into membership to both Societies. By this resolu- 
tion, the Alpha Ptho Society, which was organized last year for the pre- 
paratory students was abolished. 



The Junior Auxiliary 



On Sunday evening, September 29th, the school assembled in the 
study-hall for the reorganization of the Junior Auxiliary at St. Mary's. 
Mr. Lay explained to the girls the purpose and the work of the auxil- 
iary here and Miss Katie then read Miss Cheshire's report of the work 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



done by the chapters in this school last year, after which Mr. Lay an- 
nounced the names of the chapters into which the school is divided. The 
members then gathered in their respective places of meeting and elected 
their directresses from among the faculty. 

These elections resulted as follows: Miss Thomas, Directress of St. 
Catherine's, Senior Hall; Miss Spann, Directress of St. Etheldreda's, 
East and West Rock Halls; Miss Russell, Mrs. Vincent, Directresses 
of St, Elizabeth's, Main Building, Second Floor; Miss Katie McKim- 
mon, Directress of St, Monica's, Miss McKimmon's Dormitory; Miss 
Cribbs, Directress of St. Margaret's, Miss Cribb's Dormitory; Miss 
Sutton, Directress of St, Anne's, Miss Sutton's Dormitory. 



School Notes. 



We have two girls from Buffalo, K Y., Nellie Kintner and Mar- 
guerite Halbin. 

Mrs. Frank Wood, of Edenton, came with her daughter Rebecca, at 
the opening of school. 

Mary Shuford enjoyed a visit from her sister Rosa, who is an old 
St. Mary's girl herself. 

Mary Wells' parents passed through Raleigh a short time ago, and 
stayed a few hours with her. 

Some of the girls went to Parsifal, which was presented at the opera 
house on the 11th of this month. 

Margaret Eldridge, an old St, Mary's girl, came back to enter her 
two younger sisters at St. Mary's. 

Every one misses Elizabeth Waddill, who, on account of ill health, was 
obliged to go North for treatment. 

Meta and Sarah Boylan enjoyed a visit from their aunt, who came 
and stayed with them at St, Mary's. 

We are all so delighted to have Lula Taliaferro back with us. She 
was detained until late on account of sickness. 

Mrs. N". L. Law, of Washington, D. C, spent a few clays in the city 
with her daughter, Derryle, who is at St. Mary's. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 13 

Alice Spruill, an old St, Mary's girl, paid a short visit last month to 
her sister Martha Byrd, who is with us this year. 

Some of the girls enjoyed a visit from Miss Mary Irwin Bridges, an 
old St, Mary's girl, who was passing through Raleigh. 

We are glad to say that JSTellie Fort, who has been ill with typhoid 
fever at her home in Raleigh, is gradually improving. 

Miss Thomas enjoyed a short but pleasant visit from Esther Means, 
who graduated with honors a few years ago from St. Mary's. 

The school is so crowded that three girls, Helen Hunter, Helen Dan- 
iel and Josephine Gilmer, have to stay down at Mr. Stone's. 

We are glad to welcome back four old girls, Eloise Robinson, Xell 
Wilson, Helen Quinerly and Ruth Newbold, who arrived late. 

Mrs. Mary S. Loomis, from Michigan, brought her daughter Frances 
to St. Mary's. Frances spent the first week with Mrs. Hawkins, in 
Raleigh. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Daniel, of Philadelphia, came to St, Mary's last 
week to enter their daughter Helen, who was at school last year at Ste- 
phens, Germantown, Pa. 

We enjoyed seeing Amelia Bingham in "A Modem Lady Godiva," 
at the opera house on the 13th. The play was sad in some parts, and 
the St. Mary's girls showed plainly that they were very sympathetic. 

All our sympathies are with Mary Virginia Bonner, from Washing- 
ton, JSL C, wha was called home at the death of her mother. We miss 
her very much, and are looking forward to the time when she will return 
to her work at St, Mary's. 

There are seven girls from Wilmington this year, Dell Burbank, Eu- 
gie Woodruff, Ha Rountree, Eliza Morton, Wilhelmina Harlow, Anna 
Wooten, Lily Taylor, Lucy Anna Poisson and another one, Elizabeth 
Woodard, is expected soon. 

Mr. Cruikshank and Miss Thomas took the Seniors, Juniors and Cer- 
tificate pupils over to the Baptist University to hear a very informal 
talk by St. Clair McKelway, editor of the Brooklyn Eagle, who was 
spending a few days in the city. 



A 4 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Julia Eosser returned at the opening of school, accompanied by her 
sister Nora Eell Eosser and their cousin Martha Francis. Julia, we 
are sorry to say, had to leave after a week's stay on account of sick- 
ness. Her departure was greatly regretted by her many friends at St. 
Mary's. 

The first football game of the season was played Monday afternoon, 
Sept. 30th, between Eandolph Macon College and "A! and M." A 
crowd from St. Mary's enjoyed the game, and as was seen by the enthu- 
siasm, the sympathizers with the "Eed and White" were greatly in the 
majority. 

The following named girls enjoyed pleasant visits from some member 
of their family: Grace Ward, Annie Wood, Annie Ihrie Pou, Emily 
Campbell, Tillie Haughton, Norman Leland, Laura Meares, Virginia 
Prettyman, Frances Broadfoot, Grace Snow, Margaret and Bessie Er- 
win, Fannie Dockery and Lila Justice. 

Mr. Lay was absent for the last two weeks, at the General Convention 
in Richmond. He came home the first Sunday, but returned next day. 
A number of the girls went to hear the Bishop of Chicago, who came 
down from the Convention to preach at Christ Church in Ealeigh. 
On Sunday, October 13th, Eev. J. K. Parker preached at St, Mary's 
Chapel in Mr. Lay's absence. 



!n Lighter Vein. 



Greetings at St. Mary's 



On the eighteenth of September, 
A day we all remember, 
At the train that night — 
The kissing — a sight! 

Hats flew off, hair was mussed, 
But to get off with this they were lucky. 
The questions they asked were many, many, 
From Mr. Cruikshank to "Duckie." 

Altho' the next morning red were their eyes 

And distinct and continual could be heard their sighs, 

When dinner time came and they dressed like fairies, 

All said they were glad to be back at St. Mary's. 

Mary Kipps. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



An Episode. 



I. 



St. Mary's School's in Raleigh, 

By famous A. M. C. 
The laundry famed so far and wide 
Tears up the clothes on the northern side; 
A pleasanter spot we've often spied. 

But when begins my ditty, 
Only about a week ago. 
To see five school girls suffer so 

From hunger was a pity. 

II. 

Fudge ! 
They slipped by the matron and stole the milk; 

Bribed "Duckie" with a diamond ring; 
Swiped the vanilla as slick as silk, 

Then up the stairs as we heard her sing: 
"Hurry , 'Sugar,' and close the door, 
And mighty soon I'll git some more ; 
Dar's teachers 'round as I'se said before. 

So, by running and hurrying, 

Giggling and scurrying, 
We generally reached the second floor. 

III. 

At last the maidens in a body 

'Round the chafing dish were flocking; 
"I'm scared," cried one, "for the L. P.'s no noddy ; 

And as for the other teachers locking 
The door makes not a bit of diff.' 
For all through the hall there's a suggestive whiff. 

I can imagine one now with an angry sniff — 
Stop up the key-hole with that piece of sacking, 
Or sure as fate they'll send us packing." 
IV. 
Just as she said this what should hap 
At the chamber door but a rousing rap! 
"Help us!" cried the culprits, "What's that? 

Anything like the sound of a Bat 

Makes my heart go pit-a-pat." 
At this the whole confederation 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Quaked with a mighty consternation. 

A minute they whispered in council; 
Then, "Don't spill the candy! get under the bed! 
Blow out the charing dish! get off my head!" 
The door opened wide 
As "She" stepped inside, 
And under the bed we nearly died. 
And none of us could enough repent 
When off we were to the L. P. sent. 



M. S. 
I. R. 



A Specimen of Thought Concentration. 



"Well, at last I guess I can find time to study. Such a bore to have 
to stop other more important things. Xo, I haven't time to work alge- 
bra for you. I can't help it if the teacher won't explain, that's her 
fault." 

"Anybody seen my history ? No, it's a brown book. I am just cer- 
tain I left it in the hall. You all are the most meddlesome— yes, that 
was the right place for it, just as right as any. Yes, here it is, on the 
book-case. I'm sure I never put it there, of all places." 

ir No, I haven't a long lesson for to-morrow, just two hundred pages 
and original observations. Xo, I haven't got another pencil and I am 
using this one to 'observe' with. I don't see why they don't put every- 
thing there is to say about it in the book anyway ; I am sure the author 
ought to be able to do it better than we." (Five minutes' quiet.) 
"Anybody got a stamp? ~No, nothing very important." (Another 
quiet.) "Well, I guess that's enough for this, but it's a good thing I 
wrote down my observations for I don't remember a thing I read. You 
folks talked so much I couldn't hear myself think. Anyhow I put a 
good hour's study on that and I think that's all that ought to be expected 
of anybody." M M 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alurnme Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh, 
f Mrs. M T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. 1 M. Pittentjer, Raleigh, 
Vice-Presidents, -j Mrg F p Tuckei r R ' ui ei^ii, 

LMrs.KatedeR Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



From an Alumnae standpoint this must be a disappointing issue of 
The Muse. For the first time it is necessary to report little or no 
progress in the furtherance of the different objects which, discussed 
from time to time in The Muse, are now pending. There are two 
reasons for this failure to make due progress — one, the lack of time and 
energy that it has been possible to put into pushing the matters from this 
end ; the other, a lack of enthusiastic support on the part of those who 
might reasonably be supposed to be interested and who doubtless are 
interested, though they have failed to make their interest broadly felt. 
It is idle to discuss these reasons now. The important point is to make 
up in the present season of activity for any failures in the vacation 
period now behind us. 

The matters which have been brought to the attention of the Alumnae 
through The Muse and which are as yet unsettled are three: 

(1) The placing of an All Saints window in the Chapel in com- 
memoration of the lives of all those who have lived for and loved St. 
Mary's, past and present — an alumna; memorial window. 

(2) The arrangement for better and more effective reunions of the 
| alumna? at St. Mary's and elsewhere, on Founders' Day (All Saints' 

November 1), or May 12th, the date of the first opening, or some other 
convenient time or times. 

(3) The raising of the fund for the two additional alumna? scholar- 
ships — the Mary Iredell and the Kate McKimmon Scholarships — pro- 
vision for which was made at the last annual meeting of the organized 
alumna? in Mav. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



None of these objects has been lost sight of, and yet little progress has 
been made vet in any of the three. When the last issue of The Muse 
was printed it was hoped that the first two of these three matters would 
be settled by or on this Founders' Day; but though the new administra- 
tion of the school is thoroughly in sympathy with these and other 
alumnae objects, yet the mass of other matters requiring- immediate atten- 
tion has so consumed the time that it has been impossible to give the 
energetic help that the objects need. 

We may therefore hope this fall only for some little additional revival 
of the alumna; spirit, for some little further encouragement of the 
alumnae projects, and wait a little longer for their accomplishment. 



The Alumnae on Founders Day. 

The Feast of All Saints has now been observed for some years at St 
Mary's as "Founders' Day." Xot as much has been made of the occa- 
sion as might have been done, and yet the simple turning of the thoughts 
of those at St. Mary's for a very brief time to the life and work of the 
Founder and his successors and helpers, and to the history and purpose 
of St, Mary's, is always very stimulating. 

The Alumnae away from the school have as yet paid no especial atten- 
tion to the day as "Founders' Day," no matter how carefully they ob- 
served it as All Saints. This is a good year to begin, and The Muse 
would like to ask, speaking unofficially for the officers of the Alumnae 
Association, that, wherever two or three "St. Mary's girls" can be gath- 
ered together, at some time on All Saints' Day a brief meeting be held 
in observance of Founders' Day. In those communities in which it is 
in touch with members of the Alumnae, The Muse will furnish sug- 
gestions for this meeting by letter and, inasmuch as the new Hector, Mr. 
Lay, will necessarily be unable to be elsewhere than at the school on 
that day, he will send his greeting to the Alumnae wherever thev meet 
together by letter. We hope that there may be a number of these meet- 
ings this year and that a representative from each point will write The 
Muse about the meeting that, through them, an impulse may be given to 
a larger and more widespread observance in future years. 



The St.' Mary's Muse. 19 



The Alumnae Muse. 



Last year the Board of Editors set aside the special fall number of 
The Muse to be an Alumnae Muse. This number will go to press 
within the next fortnight. It will contain revised lists of the graduates, 
etc., and the year's record of deaths and marriages so far as the informa- 
tion is at hand, in addition to articles of interest from members of the 
Alunmse. The Editors would greatly appreciate any notices of mar- 
riages, deaths or changes in residence that may not have appeared in 
The Muse from month to month, and are necessary in order to make 
the record accurate. 



The Improvement of the Chapel. 



Continuing Mr. DuBose's policy of improving the Chapel in every 
way possible, Mr. Lay has already made a number of improvements in 
minor furnishing. 

There are at present no vestments of any kind belonging to the 
Chapel, and he would like to bring this lack to the attention of those 
who may be interested and willing to provide some of these vestments. 
He would especially like to have a set of stoles and a surplice and cas- 
sock for use on the not infrequent occasions when visiting clergymen 
"happen in." 

Beginning with the meeting of the Convocation of Raleigh at the 
opening service of the session, which brought most of the neighboring 
clergy to St, Mary's, there have been a number of visiting clergymen in 
attendance at the Chapel services already this year. During the Gen- 
eral Convention, the student-body heard Bishop Anderson, of Chicago, 
at Christ Church on the first Sunday evening, though Mr. Lay returned 
for the morning service ; Rev. Mr. Parker, of Waterville, 1ST. Y., held 
the services on the second Sunday, and on the third Sunday, when the 
Convention had adjourned, Bishop Mann, of ISTorth Dakota, spoke 
briefly at the evening service, and those who wished to do so heard him 
at the Church of the Good Shepherd at night, Mr. Stone, as lay 
reader, held the services during the absence of Mr. Lay at the Con- 
vention. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



Alumnae Notes. 



The new Auditorium has been the centre of attraction for visiting 
Alumnae during the summer and since the session re-opened, and few 
days have passed without one or more coming back for a peep at this 
and the other improvements at Alma Mater. 

Miss Saida Hanckel, of Charleston, spent August with Miss Dowd, 
and enjoyed brief visits of inspection at the school. Other friends, who 
are wont to return to Ealeigh each summer for a longer or shorter 
glimpse at the scene of their school days, journeyed elsewhere this season. 1 
Miss Susan Frost traveled west to California and Colorado; Miss Flor- 
ence Slater was also in the Far West ; Miss Mabel Hale did not get to 
Ealeigh ; Miss Alice Jones was here for a short time in September. 
Miss Christine Busbee has returned to her teaching at Mt, Holyoke, j 

but Miss Jennie Trapier has given up her teaching at . . and is 

spending the winter at her home in Ealeigh. Miss Alice Jones is again 
at Winthrop, as are Misses Sadie Jenkins and Susie Battle. Miss Mar- 
garet Jones is continuing her studies at Teachers' College and tutoring 
in New York. Miss Imogen Stone, after a year at Columbia and a 
trip abroad, is again at her work at Tulane University. 

St, Mary's has always been interested in St, Paul's School, as the 
work of Mrs. Geffroy (Nannie Davis), because of the interest taken by 
the Chapters of our Junior Auxiliary in providing scholarships there, 
and not least because of the number of St. Mary's girls who have gone 
there to help as teachers in the work. This year is no exception. Though 
Mrs. GefTroy's health has been bad and she has had to contend with 
many difficulties, slie still surmounts them all, and the session opens 
with excellent promise. Among the teachers are Miss Ella Davis, Phy- 
sical Culture and Grade Work; Miss Hannah Attmore, Music; Miss 

Minnie Davis, Assistant in Music ; and Miss Kate Curtis, Primary all 

faithful alumnse of St, Mary's. 

A great deal of interest, too, is taken in the success of Miss Kate 
Shipp's new school at Lincolnton— "Fassifern." Miss Shipp was very 
successful last year in her private tutoring in Ealeigh, but with Mrs. 
McBee decided to return this summer to their old home at Lincolnton 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



and open there a high grade home preparatory school for girls. The 
home of the school, designed especially for the purpose, is now nearing 
completion, and we hear that everything points to a very successful ses- 
sion. Miss Shipp has provided in the house accommodations for fifteen 
girls. Miss Josephine Bowen is assisting her in the teaching. 

Miss Isabel Ruff, of Ridgeway, S. C, has been appointed assistant in 
the high school at that place, and Miss Harriet Ruff has also taken up 
teaching this season. 



Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Milne Powell 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Ethel Corinne, 

and 

Mr. Gilbert Crabtree, 

on Tuesday, the twenty-second of October, 

at high noon, 

at Edenton Street Methodist Church, 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 



Mrs. Bennett Smedes 

invites you to be present 

at the wedding of her daughter 

Helen Lyell 

and 

Mr. Albert Latta 

on Tuesday, the twenty-ninth of October 

at quarter after five o'clock 

Christ Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Turner Brown 

request the honor of jour presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Eliza Richards 

to 

Mr. Edward Eoe Stamps 

ob the evening of Wednesday, the thirtieth of October 

nineteen hundred and seven 

at half after eight o'clock 

at the First Presbyterian Church 

Raleigh, Forth Carolina 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse; generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The; Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, ISTORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

EEMEMBEE IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



Johnnie had Hopes. 

" Do you suppose," said Parson Brown 

To Johnnie on his knee, 
" Some day you'll have a pair of wings 

And a holy angel be?" 

" Perhaps I will," said little John, 
With puckered, thoughtful brow, 

" For mamma says, beyond a doubt, 
I'm a holy terror now." 



— Washington Post. 



THE DOBBiN-FERRALL GO. 

Dry Goods 

OF Atlv KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES FENE SHOES SSB SLIPPERS 



...Send to... 

ALFRED WILLIAMS I CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 



"The Little Store.' 



W. C. STROMCffS SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FATETTEVILLE STREET 

KING-CROWELL/S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



The Tides of Love. 

Flo was fond of Ebenezer — 

"Eb," for short, she called her beau — 
Talk of "tides of Love!" Great Caesar! 

You should watch them — Eb and Flo. 

— Philadelphia Press. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVIIiLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

OROCBRQ 

WIEMrNGTOX & HARGETT STS. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing 1 Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 P. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



St. Mary's Seal Pins. 

St. Mary's Souvenir Postals, 

St, Mary's Pennants, 

Can be procured by writing to The Muse. 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

Kinston, N. O, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Capacity, 60,000 feet per day. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Ralei gh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



ROBT SIMPSON, 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELEGTRIG CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Expectation. 



BY CHARLES HANSON TOWNE. 



If a girl says "Yes/' 
Or a girl says "No," 

'Tis a matter more or less 
Of importance, I trow. 



When I tell you, in my prime, 
That I'm happy, you can guess, 

Simply by the foolish rhyme, 
That she answered with a — 

— Cosmopo litan. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 

BARRETT & THOMPSON, 

Architects and Engineers, 

raleigh, n. c. 

penn mutual life insurance co. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital 115,000. Surplus $50,000. Deposits over 
$750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

POWELL & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 

Safety, Courtesy and Accommodation to 
Patrons. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 

W. N. Jones, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Timberlakb, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

ARTISTIC FURNITURE. 

"We make a specialty of odd pieces in 

Antique and Modern Designs. 

Call and see us. 

Roy all & Borden Furniture Co., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., 

Raleigh, N C. 

H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



W. B. MANN, 

11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 

"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 



PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL,, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, • 
Surplus, • 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100,000.00 

100,000.00 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




JOHN C. DREWRY. 
'MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE-' 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

^Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 



School Calendar, I907-'08. 



September-October, 1907. 



September 20, Thursday. — Session opened at 11 a, m. Opening remarks by Bishop 

Cheshire. 
October 16, Wednesday. — State Fair Day. Afternoon at the Fair. 
October 19, Saturday. — 8:00 to 9:00, Sigma Lambda Reception. 
October 26, Saturday.— 8:00 to 9:00, Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 
October 31, Thursday.— 8 : 00 to 9:00, Hallowe'en Entertainment, 
November 1, Friday. — All Saints. Founders Day. Holiday. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North -West. 

OUBLEr DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Dav 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South- West annlv 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address ' 

C. H. fUTTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD P. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent Second Vice-President 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



wation Central for the Carolina^. 



Climate Healthy and Sab 



ary' s School, 



RALEIGH, N.\tf 



(for girls and young women). 



65tp ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER. 10, 190: 



EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 19QS. 



1. 7HE COLLEGE. 

jsic ma&oL. 

JSINESS S(3S00L. 

4..i^^m^$kcH0 ol. % - 

5, THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 




Twenty-five- Members in the Faculty. 



?itenfs/?ed,Pi 



tic train: 




epartment. Much Equipment Mew. Tiyeatjr-eighi 

be and Steinway Grand Pianos. BBwBe 

an4 Christian side of Education without slight 



^&%#talotfu4 ^^'.qtJi^J^fdrr^iiojk dddress 



Rev. George W. Lay i 
H RECTOR. 



f!!pW^^^!:'^■i^?■ 



November, 1907 



St. flfoary's flfouee 




Ubanftsgiving flumber 



Kaldflb, n. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



meek-looking nun seem to mind the fiercest of all Indian braves \>y her 
side. Three times the motley crowd circled around the parlor, then, as 
all sat down, the feature of the evening began. 

At the first strains of the "wedding march" a negro bridal procession 
solemnly filed into the room. The minister took the lead, while the 
two little flower girls brought up the rear. The blushing ( ?) bride car- 
ried a lovely bunch of "pig-daisies," while the groom was very effective 
in white trousers, tuxedo and high silk hat. 

After the ceremony the Grand Ball began, which was thoroughly en- 
joyed by all. Refreshments were duly served, and the 9.30 bell was 
greeted with many sighs. I. J. R. 



"he Message of the Wires. 



It had been hours since noon, when Allen Gordon had sped onward 
the last imperative clicks of his machine, and there was silence in the 
office. "All is well," had been the words sent over the wires, and the 
operator had long since ceased to ponder over the possible value of that 
sentence. 

It was winter, cold and dreary, and without the softening beauty 
of snow. A short stretch of railroad, a little clearing skirted with bare- 
boughed trees, the southern outposts of the Pennines, through which 
December's wind whistled and moaned — this was the outlook from 
Gordon's small window ; and he turned away to the scene within, which 
a stranger perhaps would have thought but a counterpart of the first. 
However, the man's trained eye saw not the dingy little stove with 
crooked pipe kept in place only by numerous wires — as tho' it were itself 
a tiny telegraph station, — for a fire burned within giving forth needed 
warmth, and it overlooked the room's meagre furnishing and its black- 
ened walls, passing at once to a little group of books nestled together 
on a plain wooden shelf of home manufacture. Five volumes there 
were — a Bible, "The Scottish Chiefs," "Anne of Geierstein," Scott's 
"Lord of the Isles," and "Westward Ho !" — a tiny library, yet his very 
own, and all save one volume had been bought by means of saving and 
self-denial, and bought for love. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



But this morning as Gordon's gaze rested upon them he did not offer 
to go to them that he might read them or even handle them. Only 
yesterday he had finished reading for the fifth time "The Lord of the 
Isles," and fresh in his mind were many of its stirring lines. But this 
morning he would go neither to Switzerland with the "Maid of the 
Mist," nor join Amayas Leigh on his travels "Westward," nor yet again 
with Scotland's hero roam over his own beloved land of the purple 
heather ; for he was devising plans by which he might lessen the empty 
stretch of shelf and add yet another to his treasures. 

Just when deep in these thoughts the call of the wires startled him 
and he responded almost automatically. The message passed on, he 
wrote it down, something in the name thrilling him with a vague fear. 
The telegram from Selkirk, Scotland, was a sad one, telling Alice Gra- 
ham in London of the death of her mother. 

Gordon clasped the paper tightly in his hand, and raised his eyes to 
the window. The weird winter twilight was fast falling, wrapping the 
scene in even greater somberness. But as he gazed the outlook faded 
from his sight, and the man saw that which for long years his eyes had 
not beheld and there came to his ears the sound of a voice long stilled. 
"Whist ye, laddie, dinna greet sae sore. Thy mither — and, aye, but 
she was a bonny lassie in her day — thy mither wadna hae thee weep." 
Such were the words with which the old Scotchman had sought to 
comfort the motherless boy; but the sobbing had not ceased at his bid- 
ding. And the tapping of bare boughs against the cottage roof, the 
dreary moan of the winter wind over the bleak moors, the silence of 
the waters of the Yarrow, hushed and stilled by the snow and ice on 
their bosom, — all these were not conducive to the lessening of sorrow. 
But it was the touch of a small hand and the sound of a little lassie's 
voice that had at length stilled the childish sorrow and lured the tired 
lad to sleep. 

Gordon, who had been that "tired lad," could feel now the touch of 
that small cool hand gently drawing from his eyes the dampened, tangled 
mass of curls ; and, surely, Alice was saying again those words : "Allie, 
the snaw lies gently on thy mither, and it does na' hurt her ; but, Allie 
boy, should the sound o' thy sobbing reach her, 'twould bring the tears 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



to her ain bright eyes — and ye wadna hae it sae." No new truth had the 
little maiden sought to teach the troubled lad, but that rare sweetness of 
character, that innate tender sympathy that would comfort and make 
strong, had touched the little aching heart and had stilled its pain. 
And through the dreary weeks that followed she had never left him, 
giving him that strength which alone he could not find; so that from 
his first great sorrow he had come forth brave and ennobled by the 
single, unconscious teachings of the little maid, child though she was. 

But the years — and thirty of them had since passed — parted them. 
It was the same story oft told before. There had been a dire misunder- 
standing. His highland pride had but served to widen the breach, and 
had remained unsoftened, untouched by all that Alice, as woman, could 
do. And so they had parted — he to bury himself from contact with 
men, she to go still farther southward to the metropolis of England, 
where her life was spent in the care of little orphan ones. 

Whereas she was surrounded by those whom she served — and they 
were many, — he had as companions only books, those few, small vol- 
umes. Yet he had chosen them well ; for, having but little money to 
spend for such luxuries, he planned his purchases carefully. His love 
for the beautiful in books had led him to select from the countless vol- 
umes those that were able to give him much. The grandeur of Alpine 
scenery with its mist's and its waters had come to him from the pen of 
Scott, as also had the warlike ring of "The Lord of the Isles;" "The 
Scottish Chiefs" had brought to him the glamor of knighthood; and 
Kingsley had taken him to strange and beautiful lands, and had caused 
him to live in the "Merry England" of olden days. And so it was that 
his books kept alive his sympathies, the joys and sorrows written on 
those peopled pages touching him, even as the smiles and tears of her 
little charges found ever a quick response in the heart of Alice. 

Gordon had thought that she had passed from out of his life, but 
again he saw clearly the deep blue eyes, the fair hair, and the sweet 
face of Alice Graham. Could it indeed be that she too was now mother- 
less ? Well did he know the deep, tender love she bore that little mother 
now lying asleep within sound of the waters of Yarrow, and how deeply 
that message of the wires would that night pain the young woman's 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



heart. Silently he rose and placed before him the small, worn Bible, 
her gift to him in that far off time of his own sorrow, that now had 
suddenly drawn very near. On the fly-leaf was written in a girlish hand 
his name and the date of his mother's death. Long he gazed while the 
twilight deepened, nor did he move until the written page became 
blurred. 

And many hours later as he passed forth to his night lodging, his 
hand held tightly a letter bearing the address of the telegram — a letter 
that would break the silence of the years. M. M. H. 



Bishop Mann's Addresses. 



On Sunday, October 20, Bishop Mann, of North Dakota, visited 
Raleigh, and we of St. Mary's had the pleasure of having him with us 
at Chapel that afternoon. He said evening service, together with Rev. 
Mr. Hunter, of St. Augustine's School, and our own rector, and de- 
livered a short address to the school. 

After a brief welcome and a few words about the mission work in his 
State, he spoke on a verse from the evening psalter, — "Man goeth forth 
to his work, and to his labour until the evening." He gave us some very 
helpful thoughts to remember about this text: first, that each one of 
us was put into this world for a definite purpose, to do a certain work; 
second, that man must do his work while the day lasts, for evening 
comes when work must stop, and it may come upon him before his work 
is ended ; third, that however long and weary the day, and however hard 
and irksome our work or labour, the evening comes at last when work is 
ended and we may rest. 

On Sunday night Bishop Mann preached at the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, and a number of us attended the service and thus had the 
pleasure of hearing him a second time. His address there was on mis- 
sion work among the people of his State. He said at the beginning that 
he was not going to do two things which he had been told almost every 
missionary who spoke on missions did, — he was not going to tell us 
stories, either pathetic or humorous, because he did not believe they 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



proved anything ; and tie did not intend to talk about his hardships and 
trials, for he thought the Bishop of Alaska the only bishop in our 
church who has cause to complain of his burdens. His intention, he 
said, was simply to give us some facts about North Dakota and the 
work he and his clergy are doing there. After describing the physical 
features of the State, giving its size, the number and size of many of 
the towns and cities, most of which are small and far apart, he spoke 
of the resources and industries of the State, the railroad facilities, and 
the large percentage of foreign-born inhabitants, the greater number of 
whom are Roman Catholics. The wealth of the State, he told us, is 
very equally distributed, there being no paupers, and at the same time 
no millionaires — the majority of the people are of moderate means. He 
spoke at some length upon the educational advantages, pointing out that 
there was scarcely a town of any size whatever which has not a good 
high school. The fact of the towns being so far apart makes missionary 
work in the State peculiarly difficult ; the people are scattered so that it 
is hard to reach them all and then traveling expenses are very heavy. 
He said his great need now is for clergy, the number working with him 
at present being very few and inadequate for the demands made upon 
them for time and energy. With this small number of clergymen, he 
can not possibly reach every town and isolated dwelling regularly once 
a week or even always once a month, yet he sends a clergyman to hold 
services as often as possible wherever there are any, however few the 
number, members of our church. The church papers are regularly sent 
to each church family so that the people are kept in touch with the work 
of the ministry. Whatever offering was given, he would use not for 
erecting churches, but for paying the salaries of the clergy who are so 
faithfully assisting him in this field. In the scattered towns and settle- 
ments, where often only one or two families live, but where there is 
sometimes dire need for a minister, the inhabitants are unable to con- 
tribute much toward the salaries of the clergy. Yet the church surely 
can not refuse to administer to the spiritual wants of these poor people ; 
rather, it should tell them that when they need a minister for any pur- 
pose, they have only to let their bishop know and a clergyman will be 
sent to them, whether or not they are able to pay him. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



He impressed his hearers with the necessity of having more clergy 
to assist in carrying on the good and great work which it is the duty 
of the church to perform in North Dakota. 

Bishop Mann is an earnest speaker, and all who heard him must 
have heen impressed with his deep interest in his work, and with his 
sincere desire to further the good work of the missions in his State. 

P. E. H. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Sarah Pkince Thomas, Editor. 



The pair. 



To the delight of many St. Mary's girls, the Wednesday in Fair 
Week proved to be a beautiful day — just warm enough. All that 
morning groups of girls stayed on the edge of the grove watching the 
crowded cars go by, until about half -past one, they trooped down to the 
summer house to take the special car that was waiting to carry them to 
the grounds. Once out there, they scattered in all directions— into 
every kind of side-show, and led their chaperones a chase. The camel 
and the merry-go-round were especially popular. They all said they 
enjoyed everything at the Fair, but the best thing out there was, un- 
doubtedly, the "Little Russian Prince." When five o'clock came — all 
too soon — they trudged back to St. Mary's laden with red balloons, pink 
parasols, broken rubber balls, etc., hot, dusty, tired out, and, as was to 
be expected, without a cent to their names. M. S. 



The Sigma Lambda Reception. 



The Sigma Lambda Literary Society gave a reception to its new mem- 
bers, Saturday evening, October nineteenth, in the parlor of St. Mary's. 
The room was attractively decorated in autumn leaves and ferns. 

The members and their guests, — the Faculty and officers of the Epsi- 
lon Alpha Pi Society, — were received by the president, Miss Marguerite 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Thompson, and the other officers of Sigma Lambda. Delicious refresh- 
ments were served, Miss Meta Boykin and Miss Marguerite Le Cron 
presiding at the punch bowls. 

Later in the evening Miss Gilmer sang two selections, "Sing Me to 
Sleep," and "Love Me and the World is Mine," and we all know how 
well Miss Gilmer sings. Then dancing was enjoyed by all until nine- 
thirty. 1ST. K. 



A Pleasant Afternoon. 



On Friday, October 25th, Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. Sanford enter- 
tained a number of St. Mary's girls at the Exchange Hotel, in honor of 
their daughter, Miss Marguerite Thompson and Miss Carolista San- 
ford. 

Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. Sanford and Miss Thompson received the 
guests. Dainty refreshments were served in the dining-room, which 
was very attractively decorated. On the table was a center-piece of 
pink roses, and silver candle-sticks with pink shades. 

Among the fortunate ones were "Bonnie" Broadfoot, Marjorie Brown, 
Hallie Carrison, Helen Daniel, Fannie Dockery, Lena Everett, Isabel 
Hanna, Katharine Henderson, Marguerite LeCron, Passie May Ottley, 
Carolista Sanford, Lily Taylor, Marguerite Halbin, Nellie Kintner, 
Marguerite Thompson and Eugenia Woodruff. 



Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 



The annual reception of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society, in 
honor of its new members, was given in the parlor Saturday evening, 
October 26, 1907. At 8 o'clock the guests began to assemble. They 
were met at the front door by Nannie Campbell, who ushered them to 
the parlor door. There they were received by the President of the 
Society, Sallie Haywood Battle, and her fellow officers, Julia Mclntyre, 
Grace Ward, Eva Rogerson, Paula Hazard, Frankie Self, Inez Frazer, 
Annie Wood, and Ida Rogerson. Punch was gracefully served in 
opposite corners of the parlor by Lyman Grimsley and Mary Wells, 



The St. Mar* s Muse. 



Maggie Pennington and Matilda Haughton. Later dainty refreshments 
of cream and cake were served. The parlor was beautifully decorated 
with palms, autumn leaves, ferns and carnations. 

All of the teachers were present, together with many of the city pupils, 
and the Bishop of New Hampshire, who added much to the enjoyment 
of the evening. £• S. 



The Tea of All Nations. 



St. Anna's chapter gave its annual entertainment Saturday evening, 
November the ninth, in the form of a "Tea of all Nations." The girls 
of that chapter, dressed in the costumes of different nations carried 
out the idea very prettily. 

The fish pond, from which, amid much excitment, the souvenirs of 
the evening were drawn, was a chief center of attraction. The faces 
of some of the masculine visitors, when they found themselves the 
happy recipients of neat little pairs of curling-irons, or small dolls, 
were alone worth much to see. 

Fudge and ice cream were dispensed in abundance by demure maids 
from the Old World, and in one corner a gypsy sooth-sayer read the 
palms of those who wished to know what the future had in store for 
them. 

All passed a very pleasant evening, and the entertainment was pro- 
nounced a great success. 0. F. L. 



School Notes. 



A crowd of St. Mary's girls went to hear Campanari at Metro- 
politan Hall on the seventeenth of October. 

During Fair week Lyman Grimsley made a short visit of a few days 
to her parents in Greensboro. 

Helen Liddell, from Charlotte, who is an old St. Mary's girl, made 
a visit to Kathryn Henderson at St, Mary's during Fair week. 



10 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Bishop Mann, of North Dakota, was in Raleigh on the twentieth, and 
gave a very pleasant little talk at the evening service in St, Mary's 
Chapel. 

Carmalt Grimes enjoyed a visit from her father during the Fair. 

Martha Ferebee's sister, Mrs. Stamps Howard, from Tarboro, came 
to see her during Fair week. 

Miss Batdoff has been absent for a week on a business trip. 

Sallie Haywood Battle enjoyed a visit from her sister, Katharine 
Battle, from Rocky Mount. 

Florence Beckwith had a visit from her mother during Fair week. 

Mrs. H. W. Thompson, from Baltimore, Md., accompanied by her 
daughter, Miss Nora Thompson, and little son, are spending the fall in 
Raleigh, to be with her daughter, Marguerite, who is at St. Mary's. 

Some of the St. Mary's girls went out to the Dress Parade at A. & 
M. on the twenty-first. 

Vernon Fountain, from Tarboro, was forced to leave school on account 
of bad health. 

Bishop Parker, from New Hampshire, has been spending a few days 
at St. Mary's with Mr. Lay. Bishop Hall, from Vermont, paid a visit 
to Bishop Cheshire. Both of them gaye talks in the chapel, which we 
enjoyed very much. 

We were all very glad to have Mary Spruill, one of last year's grad- 
uates, with us for a few days at the first of the month. 

A number of girls from St. Mary's went to hear Madame Schumann- 
Heink at the Academy on the seventh of November. 

Mr. Cruikshank was absent this month on a two weeks' visit to his 
home in Baltimore. 

Hallie Garrison enjoyed a short visit from her mother. 

All the girls enjoyed the visit of Miss Kate Cheshire to "Ravens- 
croft," the Bishop's home. She gave a little talk to St. Monica's chap- 
ter. Everybody at St. Mary's knows "Miss Kate" and her visits are 
looked forward to with great pleasure by all. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



We regret very muck the absence of Pattie Lou Moore, of Edenton. 
She was called home by the illness and death of her father. Her many 
friends at St, Mary's are full of sympathy and hope to hav^ her back 
at school soon. 

Gertrude Sullivan, an old St. Mary's girl, recently paid a short visit 
to the school. She was on her way to "Cottendale" to the Wesson-Cot- 
ten wedding. 

Georgia Hales enjoyed a short visit from her father the first of the 
month. 

Prof. Dodd, of Randolph-Macon College, gave a lecture to the school 
on "Jefferson and Marshall" on the evening of Friday, Nov. 7th. 

We are glad to have Mary Owen with us. She is the daughter of the 
Vice-consul of the United States to Guatemala, and her home is at 
Guatemala. 

Mildred Borden and Elizabeth Smith went home for a few days lately. 

Coatesie Benedict recently received a visit from her uncle, Dr. H. 
C. White, of Athens, Ga., and Helen Hunter from her father, Mr. F. 
P. Hunter, of Portsmouth, Va. 

Isabel Clark, of Tarboro, and Mary Wiggins, of Suffolk, two old St. 
Mary's girls, came by the school on their way to Chapel Hill, for the 
November dances. 

A number of girls went to hear the Shubert String Quartet, at the 
Baptist University on the 12th. 

A good many of the girls are looking forward to going home Thanks- 
giving. 



TKe St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. ealeigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 
Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 
Eva Rogerson. Eleanor Randolph Wilson. 

Minnie Leary. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, Sarah Prince Thomas. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



Thanksgiving. 



Another Thanksgiving is almost here, and to many it will be the first 
that they have spent away from home and friends, or at least, the first 
they have spent at St. Mary's. Some are doubtless thinking only of 
what they would be doing if they were at home, and that Thanksgiving 
Day here is very dull. But, as the old girls will testify, Thanksgiving 
is always very pleasant at St. Mary's, for with the Chapel service in the 
morning, when we give thanks for the many things we have to be thank- 
ful for, and the "feasts" in the afternoon, the day passes very quickly 
indeed. 



The Visit of the Bishops. 



We wish to say just a word or two about Bishop Parker's visit, and 
also those of the other Bishops that have been to Raleigh recently. 
Bishop Anderson, of Chicago, was here one Sunday during the General 
Convention, and we were fortunate in that we heard his beautiful talk 
at Christ Church Sunday evening. ISText came Bishop Mann, of North 
Dakota, who gave us a very enjoyable talk Sunday afternoon in the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

chapel and also a most interesting talk Sunday evening in the Church of 
the Good Shepherd on his work in North Dakota. Bishop Hall, of Ver- 
mont, preached an excellent sermon on " Christ as the Good Shepherd," 
in the Church of the Good Shepherd Sunday evening, October 27th, 
and he also made a charming address to us in the Chapel Monday 
morning. 

Now we come to Bishop Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New Hamp- 
shire, last though not least. He came home with Mr. Lay from the 
Convention and stayed with him until after "All Saints." We can not 
begin to say how much we enjoyed his visit to us, and especially the 
two sermons that he preached in the Chapel, one on Sunday morning, 
October 27th, and the other on All Saints. Both talks were very appro- 
priate, but the one on All Saints was especially so, and made us feel 
what the day means to us, both as All Saints and as Founder's Day. 



The Old Story. 



Now just a word to the girls of last year and the other Alumna?. We 
have received very few subscriptions from you for this year. What is 
the matter ? The Muse needs your support, and we hope that you will 
give it. Will you not try to send in your subscriptions as early as 
possible ? 

Again this year The Muse has decided to give three prizes at the end 
of the year. One will be given for the best story, one for the best essay, 
and one for the best poem that is handed in to The Muse for publica- 
tion this year. Get to work, girls ; every one has an equal chance. 



14: The St. Maky's Muse. 



With The Exchanges. 



There is no more pleasant feature connected with the publication of 
a school periodical than the visits from other like publications which 
come to inspire the editors with a greater enthusiasm for their work and 
to help them by giving them an opportunity to see by comparison their 
weak and their strong points. For there is no greater incentive to good 
work for most of us than friendly rivalry. The student body, too, if 
they will, can find both pleasure and profit in reading and comparing the 
publications of university, college and school. In no way can there be 
obtained a better impression of the breadth and divergence of student 
interests and student activities, and a firmer impression of the oneness 
of student life. The Muse exchanges are placed in the Library for the 
benefit of all, and the members of the school are invited to enjoy them 
there. 

The Muse adheres to its former policy of aiming to be the news-organ 
of the students and alumnse and not a literary magazine. And this, too, 
after due consideration of the dictum of the exchange-editor of the Ran- 
dolph-Macon Monthly, who holds that the true function of the college 
magazine is "to furnish subscribers interesting reading, permeated with 
college spirit, and to afford students the opportunity to display their 
literary talent" ; and that student publications devoting their attention 
to "athletics and other activities of student life," or publishing "news 
half a month after it is made," are "not worthy of consideration." 
Opinions on this point differ, and we are content to aim on at our ideal 
and wish our fellow-editors success in their aim to reach their goal, 
whatever their best judgment may cause that goal to be. 

The October and November magazines have come in numbers and they 
make a very favorable impression. As we glance over copies of some 
of the same magazines of three and four and five years ago we can but 
feel that the Southern student publications are keeping up with the 
progress of other things in the Southland, and that they deserve hearty 
praise. Each year new publications spring into being as evidence that 
the students of their respective institutions are taking on more life, and 
each year the old magazines grow better. While we should not expect 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



the same quality of contributions in high-school papers as in university 
magazines, or in college publications as in the great monthlies, most of 
the contributions now printed have more or less worth when we consider 
the student-body from which they emanate, and it is becoming less and 
less frequent to receive a poorly printed, carelessly arranged magazine, 
or one in which contributions are manifestly printed only because it is 
necessary to fill up space. 

We have before us and acknowledge with thanks the current numbers 
of the Acorn, Clemson College Chronicle, College of Charleston Maga- 
zine, College Message, Concept, Davidson College Magazine, Elonian, 
Georgia Tech, Guidon, Rollins Quarterly, High School Folio, Maryland 
Collegian, Messenger, Oracle, Orange and Blue, Palmetto, Parle School 
Gazette, Pine and Thistle, Randolph-Macon Monthly, Bed and White, 
Quill, Trinity Archive, University Magazine, Wake Forest Student, 
Washington Collegian, and Winthrop College Chronicle. 

Taking the magazines as a whole, we are struck by the dearth of 
verse. In several of them, noticably the University Magazine and the 
Concept, one fertile writer is able to furnish enough material to make 
the lack of writers less noticeable. Essays and stories there are in num- 
bers, varying much in quality, but on the whole good. But there seems 
to be a dearth, too, of editorial matter, most of the editorials consisting 
of the "annual remarks," which is doubtless due to the newness of the 
editors in their positions. 

One or two special features in the different magazines impress us 
very favorably. The covers, which while unfortunately often no index 
to the contents, are after all the cause of a strong first impression, are 
especially good. The October covers of the University Magazine, the 
Clemson College Chronicle, and the Guidon, and the November cover of 
the Davidson College Magazine especially strike our fancy. 

The Elonian, which we welcome into life and a place among us, has a 
good idea, we think, in announcing its purpose "to dedicate each volume 
of the magazine to some individual who has been prominently connected 
with Elon College, or who has, by reason of his benefactions or other 
eminent service, left the impress of his life upon the institution." It 
hopes "in this way to preserve brief but accurate facts in the lives of as 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



many as possible of those who have been largely instrumental in making 
Elon College what it is to-day, and of those who shall be largely instru- 
mental in developing the 'greater Elon' of the future." 

The University Magazine continues its laudable efforts to get the 
Inter-collegiate Short-story Contest inaugurated on a sound basis, and 
we hope the efforts will this year be crowned with success. 

The Trinity Archive very fittingly devotes a large part of its October 
issue to tribute to the late John Charles McNeill. And, whatever others 
may think of the advisability of the plan, the Wake Forest Student, in 
presenting its annual issue devoted to the Baptist Historical Papers, 
and the Davidson College Magazine, in issuing in October a Jamestown 
number and in November a Foot-ball number, carry the idea through 
well. 

In conclusion, one word of hearty congratulation to the editors of the 
Guidon. The October-November number is good from start to finish. 
Form and matter are equally acceptable. May the coming numbers 
keep to this standard and the Board continue to receive the co-operation 
of the student-body that they so richly deserve. 



Clippings. 



From the Durham High School Messenger: 

The following short poem shows what may happen when grammar is neglected. 
Such is the dire result — "A Poem": 

Am she went, be she gone? 
Has her left I all alone? 
Her can never come to we, 
Us can only go to she 

It can not was." — Ex. 

(Beware of trying to be a poet.) 



From the Flushing High School Folio: 

Mary had a little lamb, 

Its fleece was gone in spots, 

For Mary fired her father's gun, 
And lamby caught the shots! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



Mary had a little lamb — 

You've heard this fact before; 

But have you heard she passed her plate 
And had a little more? 

Mary had a little lamb, 

For which she did not care; 

She took it back to be exchanged, 
And got a "Teddy Bear." 



A Slasher of Sentiment. 



E. Fitzel in the Maryland Collegian: 

The sentimental girl sat on a window seat in a very complacent mood — she was 
satisfied that her attitude was quite picturesque, and gazed dreamily into the distance 
to heighten the effect. All this might impress any one who happened in; and well, 
too, for the S. G. was greatly impressed with herself. Was she not in love? Ah, 
yes! there was a romance — a sorrow — hidden under her rather prosaic exterior, for 
her love was not returned. Her life must always be weighted down by the burden of 
her heart. She was searching for her kerchief in which to shed sundry well-timed 
tears, when she heard a gentle "tap-tap" at the door. A somewhat angular, white- 
clad figure appeared. A spirit? Ah, no! A very material voice said: "Young 
lady, you have a practice period." 



The English Language. 



From the Maryland Collegian: 

"We'll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes, 
But the plural of ox should be oxen, not oxes. 
Then one fowl is goose, but two are called geese; 
Yet the plural of moose should never be meese. 
You may find a lone mouse, or a whole lot of mice, 
But the plural of house is houses, not hice. 
If the plural of man is always called men, 
Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen? 
The cow in the plural may be cows or kine, 
But a cow if repeated is never called kine, 
And the plural of vow is vows and not vine. 
If I spoke of a foot, and you show me your feet, 
Should I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet ? 
If one is a tooth, and a whole set are teeth, 
Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth? 
If the singular's this and the plural is these, 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Should the plural of kiss be nicknamed keese? 
Then, one may be that, and three may be those, 
Yet the plural of hat would never be hose, 
And the plural of cat is cats, and not cose. 
We speak of a brother and also of brethren, 
But though we say mother we never say methren. 
The masculine pronouns are he, his, and him, 
But imagine the feminine she, shis, and shim. 
So the English, I think, you all will agree, 
Is the most wonderful language you ever did see." 

— Penny Pictorial. 



In Lighter Vein. 



"AAakJng Up" at rial!o\,ve'en. 

Time: Seven ten p. in., October the thirty-first. 
Place: Any dormitory. 
"I'll never get ready in twenty minutes, haven't even started yet." 
"Who's got some heads ?" "Lend 'em to me." "Somebody come paste 
these hearts on; here, hold this ribbon, my hands are all stuck up." 
"How do Gypsies fix their hair ? Mine's so curly, it'll look a sight." 
"Where's my soot ? Is my neck black ?" "Oh ! you look too cute for 
anything! ]STo, I won't tell a soul." "Are you ready?" "Come pow- 
der my hair." "Where's that sword?" "Tie my mask; that's too 
tight, I can't see a wink." "What kind of shoes do Indians wear ? I 
can never dance in these bed-room slippers !" "There's the bell ! I'm 
not near ready !" "Hurry up !" "Wait for me." "Well come on, 
you'll miss the wedding." "Don't step on my train." "Where is my 
Teddy-bear ?" "Turn out the light." "We're in plenty of time any- 
way." 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 
(Mrs. M T Leak, Durham. 
„ Mrs. I M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, J. Mrg p p Tiu . ke r, Raleigh, 

(.Mrs.Kale de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



The founders' Day Exercises. 



The feature of the November Alumna? activity was the Founders' 
Day meetings on November 1st, the first real observance of Founders' 
Day at other points than St. Mary's. A full report of the various 
meetings, with other matter of special interest to the Alumna? will be 
published in the special Alumna? number of the Muse, which should 
appear soon after this Thanksgiving issue. But a general word here is 
in order, and is printed especially for the benefit of the Alumna? who 
could not be reached in time or who are too scattered for the formal 
observance of the day. Many of them will doubtless be interested in 
the Alumna? articles and news of the Alumna? number, and the manage- 
ment of the Muse will be glad to mail a copy to any Alumna who is 
interested if she will write and request a copy or some sister-alumna will 
write for her. We should like to receive these requests at once in order 
to be able to judge how large an edition will be required. 

While the arrangements for the Founders' Day meetings were made 
at too late an hour to bring about as many effective meetings as would 
otherwise have been held, the Alumna? cooperated heartily in the move 
in each place in which it was brought to their attention, and judging 
from the letters on the subject that have since reached the Muse, it seems 
to be the general opinion that the small beginning may lead to larger 
results in subsequent years, and that these meetings will be the start in 
accomplishing the purpose of prime importance to all interested — the 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 

closer drawing together of the daughters of St. Mary's wherever they 
may be, and a more living, intelligent co-operation in furthering 
Alumnse action. 

At each point in which the Alumnse assembled in sufficient numbers, 
it was decided to organize or re-organize the Alumnse Chapters, and 
arrange for more or less frequent meetings, and by the election of offi- 
cers the school authorities are given definite representatives in each com- 
munity to whom they can look in bringing any matter of importance to 
the attention of the Alumnse of the community. 

For the most part the meetings followed the program outlined at the 
school and issued from it, and the discussion of the points of imme- 
diate interest seems to have been entered into heartily everywhere. A 
decided difference of opinion is expressed in answer to the query con- 
cerning the All Saints' Window and the Alumnse Scholarships. The 
meetings were asked to record their judgment as to whether it is better 
to first provide for the window and then take up the scholarships, or to 
drop the window in favor of the scholarships, or to work for the two at 
the same time. Some Chapters prefer the first idea, some are strongly 
in favor of the second. A discussion of the question will be deferred 
to the special number. 

The lists of Alumnse forwarded from the several meetings will be very 
helpful in forwarding Alumnse work and will be used as opportunity is 
afforded. Individual members of the Alumnse, as has been said fre- 
ciuently before, will confer a great favor by making lists of the Alumnse 
in their communities and their acquaintance and forwarding them with 
school names, married names, approximate dates at school, and present 
addresses. 

For the sake of those who are not as yet familiar with them the 
program of the Founders' Day exercises and the Rector's letter are 
published here. 

The Program Suggested for the Observance of Founders' Day by the 
Alumnae of St. Mary's, Nov. Jst. 1907. 

I. Opening Prayers (including the prayer for the school). 
II. Founders' Day Remarks, as suggested by the occasion (or extracts 
from the editorial on "Founders' Day: its message" in the 
"Founders' Day, 1906, Muse"). 



The St. Mart's Muse. 21 



III. Heading of the Letter of Greeting from the Rector of St. Mary's. 

IV. Brief address on St. Mary's, her Alumnae, or her work (or read- 

ins- of some one or more selections from the Alumna3 contri- 
butions to the Alumnae Muses. For this purpose might be 
suggested: the sketch by Miss Jessie Degen, 1892-94 — 
"When McKimmonsville Flourished" — or a sketch of some 
other period. Miss Degen's sketch will be found in the 
April, 1906, Alumnae Muse, page 26). 

V. Attention to some of the Alumnae objects now on hand (first em- 

phasizing the fact that the raising of money for any purpose 
is the one St. Mary's topic which is foreign to the purpose 
of this Founders' Day observance). 

(a) The "All Saints' Window" — explanation by some one present ac- 

quainted with the purpose; or reading of the Editorial in the 
April, 1907, Muse. 

(b) The Iredell and McKimmon Scholarships. Eeading of the cir- 

cular letter of the Committee. 

Discussion of (a) and (b).— (1) Should (a) be forthwith dropped in favor of 

(b) ; or should (a) be pushed to conclusion at once and then all the alumnae energy 
be directed towards (b) ; or should (a) and (b) be worked at concurrently? (2) 
What is the best method of getting (b) before all the alumnae? By appointing a 
sub-committee in each community, by addressing the members of the alumnae indi- 
vidually from the school, or by some other method? (3) Has this meeting any 
helpful suggestions to offer in promoting the success of (a) and (b) ? 

(c) The Alumnae Records. 

Explanation of the purpose of collecting them by some one acquainted with the 
purpose; or reading of the editorial on page 5 of the 1906 Founders' Day Muse. 
( D Making a list individually or through the secretary of the meeting of the alumnae 
of the community- — giving present name, maiden name, and approximate date when 
at St. Mary's. ( 2 ) If time allows, making a list of other alumnae known to members 
present at the meeting with whom the School is probably not in touch, remembering 
that the School is in touch with very few of the alumnae of St. Mary's prior to 1890. 
(3) If time allows, reading of the list of graduates found in the 1906 Founders' Day 
Muse and making a list of errors in names or addresses— all these lists to be for- 
warded to the School for preservation and use in compiling the records. (4) Com- 
piling a list of marriages or deaths of alumnae which have occurred in the past year, 
for use in perfecting the record which will appear in the 1907 Founders' Day Muse. 

VI. Singing of the School Song — "Alma Mater." 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Rector's pounders' Day Letter to the Alumnae. 



Raleigh, N. C., October 28 ; 1907. 
To the Alumnae of St. Mary's School. 

My Dear, Friends: — Since I have become Rector of St. Mary's 
School I have met some of you all the way from New Hampshire to 
North Carolina. My last visit in Concord, New Hampshire, a few 
minutes before taking the train to leave, was upon a St. Mary's girl who 
lives there and whose mother was also a St. Mary's girl. I have had the 
pleasure of meeting many Alumnae both here at the school and 
while at the Convention in Richmond, so that I feel I am not 
entirely unknown to some of you. I am very anxious to meet 
all of you. I also feel that the greatest benefit to the School will 
come from organization among the Alumnae that will bring them together 
when possible and that will keep them always informed of what is going 
on in the School. I therefore ask you as the first request I make to try 
to get together in your several towns and cities, and to come to the 
School as often as you can ; and above all to co-operate in all measures 
that may be taken to enable us to get the names and addresses of all 
Alumnae, so that we may send them information about the progress of 
the School. I have known of St. Mary's for a long time. I spent a 
summer in the same house with Dr. Bennett Smedes and I have met 
Bishop Bratton in Richmond. I am more and more impressed with 
the importance of the position that St. Mary's girls have taken in the 
community, and with the tremendous responsibility that rests upon us 
here at the School from whom the Church at large has a right to expect 
that the same influences shall go out hereafter. Personally I am both 
humbled and inspired by the loftiness and beauty of the ideals which old 
St. Mary's girls have derived from their Alma Mater, and which they 
devoutly believe are inseparable from her very existence. 

Each one of you may feel that she can do very little ; but, if each of 
you will feel an obligation to do that little which she knows she can do, 
the result will be an incalculable force to help us on in the work which 
centers here to be sure, but which must get its inspiration from the full 
round of the circle, if its influences for good are again to go out to those 
all about us. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



I am kept very busy here, and my most important work must of 
course be at the School. As I have opportunity I hope to get to some of 
the other centers and meet as many as possible of your number. Any- 
thing you can do to facilitate my making your acquaintance will be a 
favor to me personally and, I believe, a help to our common work. 

With very kind regards and good wishes, I remain, 

Yours very cordially, Geokge W. Lay. 



November Weddings Among the Alumnae 



The list of marriages of the month includes the names of several who 
have been prominent in St. Mary's life, both in school days and since. 
As the Alumnae marry and go out to new homes north, south, east and 
west, they carry, as they have been carrying for three generations, their 
love for St. Mary's with them and the influence of the school is broad- 
ened and often extended to new fields. It has been no infrequent thing 
in the past to hear an expression to this effect from a old St. Mary's 
girls" who have been out of reach of the school for a generation, as wit- 
ness the following letter, and we hope it will be no infrequent thing to 
hear of like instances in future, for nothing does more to encourage the 
younger sister of the present than the evidence of the past ; and yet if the 
Alumnae, as they scatter, would but make it a point to get in touch with 
St. Mary's again when established in their new homes and would keep 
constantly in touch with the school by means of its publications, we 
believe that the bond between Alma Mater and daughter would be 
strengthened even more. May the younger Alumnae, now that the 
Alumnae has a publication, grow more and more into the habit of con- 
sidering it their own and counting it as at least a little factor in their 
lives, so that they will miss it when it fails to reach them and tell them 
of their friends and their school, and may they wish to tell their friends 
through it of the events of their lives as they transpire, is the earnest 
wish of the Editors of the Muse. 

The following extracts, which tell their own story, are from letters 

received last August : 

Corpus Chbisti, Texas. 
Dear Sib: — Will you kindly send me a catalogue and all information you can of 
St. Mary's School? 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



I was a pupil there from September, 1871, to June, 1874. That was under dear old 
Dr. Smedes' regime. Since then I have lived about the country from the extreme 
north to the end of everything — Texas — and I am quite out of touch with St. Mary's 
School. 

But now I have a daughter sixteen years old, and I am looking for a school to 
which to send her. * * * When I was there Mile. LeGal was the French teacher, and 
a very good one. * * * I wonder if there is any one connected with the school now 
who was there thirty-four years ago. As I was the only Northern girl at that time I 
was generally known the "the little Yankee." The strong church training of St. 
Mary's, the kindly, uplifting influence Dr. Smedes had over all, have been with me 
all my life, and I would give my daughter the same surroundings and lasting good. 

Hoping for a reply, I am, sincerely yours, 

Saidee B. Anton Burt (Mrs. Walter Burt. 
********* 

The various bulletins, circulars and catalogues and your letter have reached me. I 
can not tell you the interest in them all. My long separation from St. Mary's has 
never lessened my interest in and love for the dear old place, and these pictures of 
St. Mary's as it is to-day bridge over the thirty years till it seems but yesterday that 
I said good-bye to Dr. Smedes at the station, "Mr. Bennett" going with me as far as 
Greensboro on my way to Asheville. At the last minute he handed me an illustrated 
paper through the car window, which I found contained a harrowing account of the 
worst railroad accident of the year. Dear Mr. Bennett ! I saw him five years later in 
Asheville, and how we laughed over it. * * * 

Saidee B. Anton Burt. 



Hunt-Holt. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lafayette Holt 

request the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

ISTerta Josephine 

to 

Mr. George Franklin Hunt 

on Tuesday morning, October the fifteenth 

nineteen hundred and seven 

at nine-thirty o'clock 

St. Athanasius Church 

Burlington, ISTorth Carolina 

At Home 
after November first 
503 South Front Street 
Wilmington, North Carolina. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 25 

Baxter-Barnes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Barnes 

request the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of their niece 

Miss Gretehen Davis Barnes 

to 

Mr. Julian Fitz- Simons Baxter 

on the afternoon of Wednesday the sixth of November 

at one o'clock 

Saint Timothy's Episcopal Church 

Wilson, North Carolina. 



Lewis-Gaither. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Gassaway Gaither 

request the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Sara 

to 

Mr. Gilbert Burnett Claiborne Lewis 

at high noon 

on Wednesday the twentieth of November 

one thousand nine hundred and seven 

at Holy Trinity 

Hertford, North Carolina. 



Wesson-Cotten. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kobert Kandolph Cotten 

request the pleasure of your company 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Elba Brown 

to 

Mr. Douglas Bertram Wesson 

on Thursday the twenty-first of November 

nineteen hundred and seven 

at high noon 

"Cottendale" 

Greenville, North Carolina. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Robards-Root. 
From the News and Observer: 

There gathered on the night of the 20th, at 9 o'clock, in Christ Church, a great 
throng of friends to witness the taking of the marriage vows by Mr. William Watkins 
Robards and Miss Sadie Smedes Root, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Root, 
of this city. 

The church decorations were simple, but artistic in the beauty of their very sim- 
plicity. Back of the altar many candles gave radiance, and upon the white back- 
ground there was a delicate tracery of ferns which was very effective, while the 
reserved section of the pews were marked by great bunches of white chrysanthemums. 

The wedding music was rendered by Mr. Wade R. Brown, who gave a brilliant 
program before the entrance of the bridal party. As the processional he rendered 
the wedding march from Lohengrin, and the recessional was Mendelssohn's wedding 
march. The vows were given by Rev. Milton A. Barber, the Assistant Rector of 
Christ Church, who was assisted by Rev. I. McK. Pittenger, Rector of the Church of 
the Good Shepherd. 

The groomsmen, who entered in couples were Messrs. A. B. Andrews, Jr., John H. 
Andrews, W. T. Old of Elizabeth City, Frank P. Haywood, W. W. Vass, Willis G. 
Briggs, George M. Gales of New York, and S. S. Parham of Henderson. 

The bridesmaids, who also entered in couples, were Misses Elizabeth Montgomery, 
Belle Pescud, Mary Armistead Jones, Elizabeth Cheshire, Isabel Busbee, Sarah 
Cheshire, Sue Robards of Henderson, and Mary Pruden of Edenton. They were 
each attired in white tulle and carried bouquets of white chrysanthemums. 

The maid of honor was Miss Annie Root, sister of the bride, and she was attired in 
pink net over pink silk, her bouquet being of bridesmaid's roses. 

The bride entered on the arm of her father, Mr. Charles Root, and was given 
away by him. She was charmingly gowned in hand-embroidered satin chiffon, 
trimmed with duchesse lace, her veil of tulle being caught up with orange blossoms. 
She carried a shower bouquet of lillies of the valley. At the chancel she was met by 
Mr. Robards, who entered from the vestry room with his best man, his brother, 
Mr. Frank P. Robards, of Henderson. 

Following the wedding the bridal party and members of the families were given a 
delightful reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Root, on Hillsboro street, and 
after this Mr. and Mrs. Robards left for a wedding trip to points north. 

The bride is among Raleigh's most attractive and cultured young women, her 
engaging personality being such as to win and to hold many friends. Mr. Robards, 
who is the teller of the Citizens National Bank, is a greatly esteemed young man, a 
factor in the social life of Raleigh, the Vice-President of the Capital Club, a repre- 
sentative young man of the city. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



The Graveyard Rabbit. 



BY AN OLD ST. MARY'S GIRL — SARAH STONE WILLIAMS. 



When the shades of night are falling, 

And the whip-poor-will is calling 
To his mate within the dark and silent wood, 

You may see a rabbit flitting 

From grave to grave, or sitting, 
Looking at the moon in quiet, thoughtful mood. 

Perhaps he then is thinking, 

As he sits there fearful, shrinking, 
Of the place where juicy peas do most abound; 

But he dares not, as when younger, 

Brave the guard — despite his hunger — 
Dreadful dragons they, that boy and keen-nosed hound. 

Now, with tim'rous ears upstarting, 

Hark, the foe, then lightly darting 
Through the leaves with noiseless, ghostly tread. 

'Tis but the pine tree's soughing, 

Or the light wind gently roughing 
The brown mantle o'er the silent sleepers spread ; 

Or a twig bereft of footing 

On the dead bough, where the hooting 
Of the owl above him fills his breast with dread. 

Now he nibbles cold, unfeeling, 

At the grass, that upward stealing, 
Thrusts its green spears through the roof above the dead. 

Should you wish to catch this rabbit, 

Note with care his wary habit; 
Lay him low with stroke upon his glossy head. 

Twelve the hour, no moon to fling you 

One bright ray. The act will bring you 
Earest luck (the left hind foot), 'tis gravely said. 

But because of fancied magic, 

Would you do a thing so tragic ? 
Take the life as sweet to Bunny as to you? 

He has "taken sanctuary," 

He asks but for grass and berry, 
And a home among the graves begrimed with dew. 



(The Muse is deeply grateful to Mrs. Williams tor her interest in its welfare as evidenced in her 
allowing it to publish these verses. She writes to Miss McKimmon f t the Muse. 

Hamilton, Ga. Nov. 15th, 1907, 

I am sending this little poem on the old superstition prevalent among the uneducated whites 
and the negroes 8 of the South Taking the "left hind foot" of a dead rabbit ; according to the 
method described will ensure "good luck". I have known many persons of whorn one would ex- 
pect ; better to "carry a ! rabbit's foot around to avert evil. I will write you later my first experience 
at St. Mary's — ''Long may she wave. ") 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



ST. MAEY'S CALENDARS FOE 1908. 



As pretty and attractive as last year ; we think prettier. 
New designs and new views. 



Orders received before December 10th will be filled at 50 cents each, 

postpaid. After December 10th, 75 cents. 

Ready December 10th. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OP ALX KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' EESTE SHOES fflffi SLIPPERS 



THEBOYLAN-PEARCECO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Cloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 

FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH. ST. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the ouly perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W. C. STROMCH'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING-CROWELVS DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



A TOAST. 



Here's to the pretty girl, 

Here's to the attractive girl, 

Here's to them both in one ; 

And here's to the girl who looks you through ; 

Drink to them standing, the petticoat crew — 

For here's to the girl I love. 



— Ex. 



M. ROSENTHAL 

XGO. 

GHOCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



S ALVA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE), 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



St. Mary's Seal Pins. 

St. Mary's Souvenir Postals, 

St. Mary's Pennants, 

Can be procured by writing to The Muse. 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N. C, 

Manufacturers of 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

at j. l. o'quinn & co. 

Leading Florists of ISorth Carolina. 

Raleigh, N. C. 


Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 
Lumber. 


H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


ROBT. SIMPSON, Drags ffi£SX; etc. 






Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 


ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy — China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sons of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




DR. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
^Dentist. 

H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 

12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



A NARROW ESCAPE. 



Although the boy ne'er learned to spell, 
His future wasn't wrecked — 

He simply used quotation marks, 
And wrote in dialect. 



—Ex. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 


BARRETT & THOMPSON, 


Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


Architects and Engineers, 
raleigh, n. c. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 


ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus 850,000. Deposits over 
8750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


POWELL, & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Safety, Courtesy and Accommodation to 
Patrons. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 

W. N. Jones Vice-President,. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place lor keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



The Citizens National Bank 



RALEIGH, N". C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100,000.00 

100.000.00 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Beown, Pres. H. E. Litchfokd, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Dtrsks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



WILLIAM'S MISTAKE. 



A William goat, with low-bowed head, 
Rushed wildly forth to butt ; 

A moment later he lay dead, 
With a shattered cocoanut! 

The fellow that he sought to crush — 

The victor in the fray — 
Turned out to be a center rush, 

Who met the goat half way ! 



-Ex. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


HARDEN'S LIVERY 
Always Ready. 


" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 


ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 






D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 
Fancy Groceries, 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 


Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 






Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERS. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 


127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



School Calendar. I907-'08. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1907. 



November 1, Friday. All Saints, Founders' Day Holiday. 

November 8, Friday, 8 p. m. Lecture. Prof. Wm. E. Dodd, of Randolph-Macon 
College on "Jefferson and Marshall." 

November 9, Saturday, 8 p. m. St. Anne's Chapter. "Tea of the Nations." 
November 16, Saturday, 8 p. m. St. Elizabeth's Chapter. "A Country Fair." 
November 23, Saturday, 8 p. m. St. Catherine's Chapter. "Mrs. Jarley's Wax- 
works." 

November 28, Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 
December 7, Saturday, 8 p. m. Muse Club in "A Smith Trick." 
December 14, Saturday, 8 p. m. St. Margaret's Chapter. Bazaar. "A White Sale." 
December 18, Wednesday, 8 p. m. Christmas Evening. North Carolina Day Cele- 
bration. 

December 19, Thursday. Christmas holiday begins at 1 p. m. 

December 19 (1 p. m.) — January 2 (Thursday), 6 p. m. Christmas Holiday. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 



ins every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Porlsmouth, and Atlanta 
n, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
illman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 



Two trair 
Birmingham, 

Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping i 

sections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-west, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. GATTIS, C B. RYAN, EDWARD F. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent Second Vice-President 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



65ih ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1907. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 28, 1908. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

, - t 0. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

St. Mary s 

s instruction in these < * JHE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Departments: f £ THE ART SCHOOL 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1907-08 are enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressiva Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Steinway Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



$atv, teas 



llfoary's 




; J^I|pl^Wirt^f 




IRaleio 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



EPIPHANY NUMBER. 



January, 1908. No. 4 



Epiphany. 

From the Eastern mountains, 
Pressing on they come, 
Wise men in their wisdom, 
To His humble home; 

Stirred by deep devotion, 
Hasting from afar, 
Ever journeying onward, 
Guided by a star. 
Light of Light that shineth 
Ere the worlds began, 
Draw Thou near, and lighten 
Every heart of man. 



Onward through the darkness 

Of the lonely night, 

Shining still before us 

With Thy kindly light, 

Guide us, Jew and Gentile, 
Homeward from afar, 
Young and old together, 
By Thy guiding Star: — 

Light of Light that shineth 

Ere the worlds began, 

Draw Thou near, and lighten 

Every heart of man. 



The New Year. 



BTJTH VERNON NEWEOLD. 



"One more story, Father Time," begged the little New Year as he 
wrapped his light robe around his dimpled form, "only one more story 
before I leave" ; and he nestled his baby face closer to the breast of 
Father Time and looked up trustingly into his eyes. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



"Well," said Father Time, "one more story ? I know many of them, 
but I will tell you one that I have never told before; even the old year 
who is dying doesn't know. I know the place well ; it is down by the 
river's edge where the black rock casts its deep shadow into the restless 
water and the dark fir tree lies broken in the slime where the sluggish 
water laps its life away. 

"Death is the first thing you see," he said, pointing to the Old Year, 
"and it will be the last to kiss you good-bye. You don't know the cold 
clammy kiss of death yet ; you haven't felt his burning eyes pierce your 
brain, but I have seen him hold his night revels by this black rock that 
T tell you of. 

"I saw a maiden and her lover ; they walked by the black rock one 
moonlight eve, the man kissed her on her eyes and then their hearts 
beat as one, but Death stood in the shadows and holding a bunch of 
poppies in his hand beckoned with them to the girl, and softly pushing 
aside her lover's fond hand, she placed her hand in the bony hand of 
Death and kissed the poppies 'till she slept. Then the boy cried aloud 
in his anguish and fell over dying in the black slime that lapped the 
shore, and the broken boughs of fir tree quietly kissed his white brow. 
An owl overhead laughed loudly and I heard him say to a childwoman 
with wonderful eyes, who was the first to know of the tragedy : 'I know 
what the future would have been. Ah, yes, he loved her then, but if 
she had lived, ha ! ha ! — ah, yes. He had her promise ; in two months 
he was going away to work and make the money to buy a home where 
she would reign queen of his heart with all his love ; he is going — he is 
gone! She waits, she is waiting — ha! ha! He never comes back, he 
weds another, but what of that? The other was fairer than she, and 
she was forgotten while she waited.' 'He wasn't false,' said the child- 
woman with great hurt in her wonderful eyes. 'Oh, wise owl in the 
moonlight, he wasn't false ; you know he, too, has gone to find her in the 
land of poppies.' 'Ah, yes,' said the owl, 'that was because she followed 
Death to kiss the poppy queen ; he had not left her then and her image 
was fresh in his mind; if he had only waited — You see, ha! ha! You 
understand?' 'No,' said the childwoman, as she unclasped her hands 
and looked up with love into the eyes of another who stood beside her on 
the sands now. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 



" 'What, dreaming again, Alixa V said the man tenderly as she arose 
and followed him. 

" 'Well,' said the owl, 'I tried to teach her a lesson, but she must learn 
it for herself, I see. Well, she has that right.' " 

The Old Year groaned and the New Year rose from the breast of 
Father Time. Already there were lines on his baby face as he grimly 
closed the eyes of the dead year, and, never looking back, slipped out 
into the night where the pale white stars twinkled and thousands of 
bells pealed forth a happy New Year. 



The Year's Gifts. 



If, love, to-night, the old and dying year 

Should ask which of his gracious gifts I hold most dear, 

I'd answer thus: "As best of all I prize 

Her woman's heart — the love-light in her eyes!" 



Serena C. Bailey. 



Somebody's Little Sister. 



PAULA E. HAZARD. 



John Stanton drove homeward through the gathering dusk. It was 
Christmas eve, and the streets were so slippery with ice and snow and 
so crowded with vehicles of all kinds that the young physician had to 
walk his horse most of the way. He ran eagerly up the steps upon 
reaching home, and after telling the servant that he wished not to be 
disturbed under any circumstances, entered his cozy study. A bright 
fire was burning on the hearth, and throwing himself in his easy chair 
before the blaze he settled himself to rest and to dream. It had been a 
hard, busy week and a particularly trying day, and now he intended to 
take a well-earned rest and not to leave the house to-night for anything. 

Christmas eve ! What memories the name called up. Five years ago 
on another Christmas eve all the joy and light had been taken out of his 
life. How well he remembered it all, as clearly as though it had been 
but yesterday, — the misunderstanding that had arisen, the hard feelings 
that had followed, and the final break. He could see her now, as 
2 



4 The St. Mary's Muse. 



standing erect, with head thrown back and with flashing eyes, she had 
bade him go and never come into her presence again. He had obeyed 
her, as he had been accustomed to do ever since they were children 
together, and he had neither seen nor heard of her now for five long 
years. With broken heart and crushed hopes he had left his home to 
continue his chosen profession in a distant city. Ah, she had judged 
him hastily, too hastily, and unjustly; she had given him no chance to 
speak, to explain matters and clear up their misunderstanding, and 
bitterly had this injustice rankled in his heart all these years. And 
jet he loved her still, had loved her devotedly during these five weary 
years, which would have been too hard but for the thought of her, and 
now on this Christmas eve he longed for her more than ever before. 
Where was she now, he wondered ? What had she been doing since 
that fatal day ? Had she ever felt a pang of remorse for the cruel blow 
she had dealt him ? Did her thoughts ever turn to that Christmas eve 
so long ago ? Did she care for him now, or ever think of him ? If he 
could only see her once again, or even know where she was and what 
she was doing this Christmas-tide, a season so full of memories for 
them both. He had accidentally heard the summer before that her 
father had lost his fortune and soon after had died. Might she not 
now be in need and forced to work to support her mother and herself — 
she who had always been accustomed to comfort and luxury? He 
gazed around his richly furnished study — all this luxury surrounding 
him, while perhaps she was wanting the comforts of life. The thought 
brought tears to his eyes and an ache to his heart. How could he find 
her and, if need be, help her without her suspecting who her benefactor 
was ? Well he knew how her proud nature would rebel and refuse all 
succor from him. 

He was roused from his reverie by the servant's voice. 

"A man at the door to see you, Doctor." 

"I thought I told you I was not to be disturbed, Henry. I will see 
no one to-night. Tell him to call to-morrow." 

a Yes, sir, so I told him. But the man won't be put off. Says he 
must see you to-night. He wants you to go out to see a sick child," 
Henry replied. 

The Doctor was in a perverse mood to-night. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Well, tell him I can't go," he said. 

The servant withdrew. As he heard the front door open the Doctor 
arose, and going to his room door, cracked it and stood listening. 
- "He says he won't go," he heard Henry say. 

"That fellow can't carry a straight message — I said I couldn't go, not 
wouldn't," Stanton muttered to himself. 

"Oh, what shall I do ?" the man cried. "I don't know any other 
doctor. I wouldn't trust any one but Dr. Stanton." 

He half turned from the door, then wheeling around he faced Henry 
again. 

"Maybe he's afraid I can't pay him," he exclaimed. "Tell him I'll 
work my hands to the bone to pay his fee, if he'll only come !" 

" 'Tain't because of money he won't go," Henry said scornfully. 
"He don't need money, he's got all he wants now. I bet it's because 
he don't want to go out in this cold," Henry explained, shivering as an 
icy wind swept around the corner of the house. 

"Go ask him once more. Beg him to let me speak to him. Maybe 
he'd listen to me," the poor fellow urged. 

" 'Tain't no use, man. The Doctor's in a contrary mood to-night. 
He shut himself up in his study soon as he came home, and wouldn't 
have a word to say to nobody, except that he mustn't be disturbed 
under no circumstances," Henry replied. 

The man in despair put forth one more effort. 

"Try him just once again. Tell him if he has any pity or love in 
his heart not to refuse to come. Tell him my little baby girl is ill and 
will surely die if he won't come and save her. It may even now be too 
late. I've had to wait so long. I can't go without him," he ended, 
tears choking his voice. 

"Poor fellow," the Doctor sighed from his study door. At the words 
his thoughts fled back and he recalled the time when she had lost a 
baby sister because the doctor had refused to leave his home on a fearful 
winter night. And he remembered how he, a boy of twelve, had sought 
to comfort the little sorrowing maid of seven, telling her that her little 
sister would not have died if only he had been big enough to be a doctor, 
that he would have made her well. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"I'll be a doctor some day when I grow up," he had added, the 
determination coming suddenly, "and I'll not ever, ever let anybody's 
little brother or sister die." 

Henry closed the front door and hastened to the Doctor's room. 

"Doctor, he says he won't go back without you. He wants you to 
go and save his little baby girl who's dying at home. 

Stanton rose wearily from his chair where he had seated himself just 
before Henry entered. 

"He won't go without me, eh ?" he asked dreamily. "Well, I'll have 
to go with him. Yes, I'll go," he quickly added. "Henry, ffet iV 
horse and buggy ready as soon as you can, and bring the man in here — 
he'll freeze out on the porch. It's fearfully cold out to-night," he said, 
shuddering as he glanced out of the window at the white, hard ground 
and the leafless branches tossing in the wintry wind. 

A few minutes later Stanton took his seat beside the father, and they 
drove off up the frozen and deserted street. 

"You say there's a lady with your child ?" he suddenly asked. "How 
does she happen to be there ?" 

"Yes, sir," the man replied, "a young lady — a trained nurse. I 
don't know her name. She said that while she was waiting to get a 
place in one of the hospitals she was spending her time nursing the poor 
who are sick and need good care. She heard of the sickness in my home 
from some minister and came yesterday to see what help we needed. 
My wife died when the baby was born two years ago," the man went on, 
tears coming to his eyes, "and the little one has always been sick and 
weakly. My oldest child, a girl, is only ten years old, and although she 
did the best she could, she didn't know what was the matter with the 
baby. But when the young lady came yesterday she seemed to know 
right off what to do for the little one. The baby seemed better until 
late this afternoon, and finally about ten o'clock the lady said she 
couldn't do anything more for the child, that she was very ill, and that 
I must go at once for a doctor. Oh, Doctor Stanton, I can never thank 
you enough for coming with me to-night, and if you save my baby I'll 
never forget it — never !" 

"Never mind that now," Stanton said, embarrassed. "We'll hope that 
the nurse and I can pull the baby through." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Doctor's horse bore them quickly to the tenement district of the 

eity. 

"We've no time to lose," Stanton said, as snatching up his satchel he 
followed the man up flight after flight of steps. When they reached the 
fifth floor, the father opening a door near the landing, motioned to the 
Doctor to enter. 

Stanton found himself in a small room which evidently served i 
kitchen, dining and bed room. By the dim light of a tiny lamp on the 
table, he saw in the farthest corner a narrow bed on which lay in an 
unconscious stupor a baby form. Bending over her and gently rubbing 
the tiny hands was a slender, girlish figure in spotless white. 

The Doctor approached the bedside, and in a deep, professional voice 
asked, "How long has this stupor lasted ?" 

Since early this afternoon," came in sweet, low tones from the stoop- 
ing figure. 

When Stanton heard the voice — that voice which he could never for- 
get — fie gave a low exclamation of wonder and surprise, and bending 
nearer touched the girl's hand. 

With a start she looked up, and as their eyes met, he whispered, 
"Dorothy!" The years seemed to roll away and they were children 
again, standing thus gazing into each other's eyes, while he tried to com- 
fort her in her first sorrow. 

For answer she turned back to the little form on the bed. "You're 
a doctor now, so you must save her. She's somebody's little sister," she 
said softly. 

"I will, with your help," he replied. 

All that night the two worked over the child, both putting forth every 
effort and using all the skill at their command. Again and again during 
that long, weary night did Stanton gaze with swelling heart upon the 
young nurse, as she tenderly, and almost like a mother, tended the little 
one and anxiously seconded every effort of his to ease its pain. And 
once, when the little life seemed almost gone, he saw her lips tremble 
and her eyes fill with tears. It was a hard battle they fought with 
death, but together they won. Just as the dawn broke on that Christ- 
mas morning, and the first faint sunbeam peeped into the dingy room, 
the baby girl sank into a natural and peaceful slumber. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



A smile flickered across the little face. Stanton seeing it reached out 
and took Dorothy's hand, and gazing long and lovingly into her dark 
eyes beaming with a proud and happy light, whispered gently, " We've 
won, Dorothy. 'Somebody's little sister' will live. Look, she is dream- 
ing of the angels, who are singing, 'Peace on earth, good will toward 
men. 



A Tale of the Mistletoe. 



E. DUVALL. 



Now he is six and she is four, 

And there is mistletoe over the door. 

"Kiss me," she says, with a toss of her curls. 

But — "No, indeed, I don't kiss girls." 

Ten years have passed, again they stand 
Under the mistletoe, hand in hand. 
"Kiss me," he says; but his hope she destroys, 
For — "No, indeed, I don't kiss boys." 

Five years go by, and now once more 

Under the mistletoe over the door. 

"Kiss me," he begs, but does not wait 

For the whispered "Yes," which comes too late. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Sarah Prince Thomas, Editor. 



The Wednesday Receptions. 



St. Mary's has for a long time deplored the limited social intercourse 
between the school and her many friends in Raleigh, caused by the in- 
convenience of calling at a large institution where the buildings are 
widely separated, and the almost certainty of finding the members of the 
Faculty out during the afternoon hours. To obviate this difficulty, and 
to make it easier to see more of her friends, St. Mary's has chosen " Wed- 
nesday" as her day when she will be at home to callers, from four to six 
o'clock. This plan was announced, and put into effect with a beautiful 
public reception given on December 11th. Receiving were Mr. and 



The St. Marys Muse. 9 



Mrs. Lay, Mrs. Sheib, Mrs. Iredell, Mrs. Cheshire, Mrs. Chas. E. John- 
sou, Mrs. R. H. Lewis, Mrs. Kemp P. Battle, Jr., and the Faculty of 
St. Mary's, assisted by representatives of the student body — Misses 
Brown, Ottley, Rosser, Francis, Taliaferro, Prettyman, Hales, Robin- 
son, Stillman, Moore, Crowell, Deaton, Borden, Everett, Howe, Du- 
Bose, Halbin and Heyward. These young ladies served fruit punch, 
tea, coffee and sandwiches, all prepared by the Domestic Science Depart- 
ment of the school. The parlor is an ideal room for a reception, a large 
number of guests were welcomed, and the afternoon was thoroughly en- 
joyed by all. It was a great pleasure to meet among the callers, an old 
friend and St. Mary's girl, Mabel Hughes, who was passing through on 
her way to Octavia's wedding— and also Miss Turpin, who though not a 
St. Mary's girl herself, brought welcome news of her sisters, Isabel Tur- 
pin, Delia and Wirt Wesson, who with the crowding cares and pleasures 
of life, are still loyal in heart to the memory of the dear old school. 

M. A. D. 



School Notes, 



On December the sixteenth, Mr. and Mrs. Lay with Mrs. Sheib, gave 
a dinner-party to the foot-ball team of A. and M. College, who won the 
championship of the South in foot-ball this past season. 

Constance Cavell, Wilmer Stone, Margaret Nelson, Jennie Belle Tur- 
ner, Estelle Egerton and Mary Owen, spent Christmas at the school. 
Mrs. Turner, Miss Batdorf, Miss Cribbs, Miss Russell and Miss Horsley 
were also at St. Mary's during the holidays, and Miss Peck enjoyed the 
vacation down town. 

Frances Loomis spent the holidays with Mrs. Hawkins in Raleigh. 

Adele Davidson visited her aunt in Atlanta, during the Christmas 
vacation. 

Marguerite Thompson and Carolista Sanford spent part of the holi- 
days in Raleigh, and the rest with Fannie Dockery, in Rockingham. 

Katharine Parker, one of the girls from New York, spent the Christ- 
mas holidays with Rita Meares, of Ridgeway, S. C, who was at St. 
Mary's several years ago. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Louise Wright spent part of the holidays with Mildred Borden, at her 
home in Goldsboro. 

Jessie Harriss, a St. Mary's girl of last year, spent the holidays with 
Ellen Duvall, and Miss Vedder visited Margaret Pennington in Tar- 
boro. 

Mr. Lay spent the last Sunday of December at Charlotte, where he 
held services at the Church of the Holy Comforter in the morning, and at 
St. Peter's in the evening. 

We are sorry to say that Grace Ward is detained at her home in Rich- 
mond, Va., on account of illness. She expects to return soon and her 
friends are looking forward to her return to St. Mary's with pleasure. 

Jane Stillman, Mary Heyward and Eugie Woodruff will not be able 
to return to St. Mary's on account of bad health. Eugie Woodruff will 
spend the rest of the winter in Mariana, Florida; Mary Heyward in 
Rion, South Carolina, and Jane Stillman at her home in Pensacola, 
Florida. 

Mr. Spanhoofd, one of the masters of St. Paul's School, Concord, 
ISTew Hampshire, spent a part of the holidays with Mr. Lay at St. 
Mary's. 

Miss Rosalie Smith, of Goldsboro, spent a few days in January at St. 
Mary's with her sister, Elizabeth Smith. 

We are sorry that Sarah Boykin could not return to school because of 
ill health. 

Admiral and Mrs. Balch, Mrs. Lay's father and mother, came to 
Raleigh the first of the ISTew Year and will spend the rest of the winter 
here, so as to be near their daughter. 

Helen Quinerly, Anna Wooten, Isabel Heywood, Lee Brown, and 
Carile Weaver could not return to school after the holidays. 

The whole school was very much distressed to find, on the return after 
the holidays, that "Chester," the faithful fireman at St. Mary's, had 
died during the Christmas vacation. 

Mrs. John Drewry gave a reception on January the ninth to her 
daughters Emma and Katharine and her guests, Misses Marguerite and 
Blandina Springs, of Charlotte, who are all old St. Mary's girls. A 
number of St. Mary's girls were invited. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



Norman Leland, of Rockingham, has entered Converse College, at 
Spartanburg, South Carolina. 

Several new girls are expected at St. Mary's the latter part of January 



to begin work at the Easter term. 



Some Belated Pre-Christmas News. 



Nov. 15th: The Country Fair. 

St. Elizabeth's Chapter gave a Country Fair in the parlor Saturday, 
November 16. It was enjoyed by all the school and a good many of th« 
outsiders. 

A charming young lady presided at the door, and each person on en- 
tering was met by two other young ladies, who presented them with typi- 
cal country fair souvenirs. 

The a catch" of the evening was the "California Red Bats" which were 
displayed in a large white tent. There was a fortune teller's tent which 
was occupied by a weird gypsy who told fortunes in a strange voice. 

"Hot dog-sandwiches" were served by two young ladies in regulation 
maid's attire. Ice cream, pink lemonade, and peanuts were "dispensed" 
throughout the evening. 

All this noise and merriment went to make up a very joyful evening. 

A. C. D. 



Nov. 23d: Mrs. Jarley's Wax WorKs. 

On Saturday night, November 23, St. Catherine's Chapter of the 
Junior Auxiliary, presented the world-famed wax works of Mrs. Jarley. 
A great number of new figures were introduced, the most popular of 
which were the Bear and his Trainer, the Davidson Foot-ball Player 
and the A. and M. Dress Parade. While these were good they could 
in no way compare with the Maniac, whose screams were so realistic and 
piercing that many hastened to leave. 

After the grand finale, in which each figure did its own special 
"stunt," the audience went into the parlor where, marvelous to relate, 
they were served with cream by the puppets, who by some miraculous 
power had become animated. E. R. 

3 



18 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Notes. 



A number of St. Mary's girls went with Mr. Cruikshank to hear a 
lecture by Mr. Frederick Warde at the Baptist University on the even- 
ing of the 19 th. 

During the two days holiday at Thanksgiving a number of the girls 
were absent. Mildred Borden and Elizabeth Smith went to their home 
in Goldsboro ; Georgia Hales, Elsie Moore, Blair Rawlings and Helen 
Daniel went to Wilson. Lyman Grimsley and Lila Justice went to 
Greensboro; Martha Byrd Spruill to Louisburg; Margaret and Bessie 
Erwin to Durham ; Grace Snow and Rebecca Wood to Hillsboro, and 
ISTora Belle Rosser to her home in Atlanta. 

Three old girls, Helen Strange, Emily Carrison and Margaret Eld- 
ridge, spent Thanksgiving at St. Mary's. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent spent the Thanksgiving holidays in Norfolk, 
and Miss McKimmon went to Fayetteville. 

Thanksgiving night Mrs. Cribbs got up an entertainment for the girls, 
which was living pictures, illustrating "Reveries of a Bachelor." The 
scene opened with Coatsie Benedict, as the Bachelor, sitting by a study 
table, in the land of memories. Before him, slowly appeared all the 
girls he ever had. His first girl, his little girl, his school girl, his roller- 
skate girl, his automobile girl. Then the different girls in different 
sports — tennis girl, golf girl, fencing girl, hunting girl, and riding girl. 
Then came the opera girl, ball-room girl, pretty girl and last, but not 
least, his bride. After this was over Miss Peck and Miss Vedder played 
on the violin and piano, and Mr. Lay entertained us all with his dialect 
jokes. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. s = a s One Dollar. 

Single Copies, s = a a = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club.,. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 
Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 
Eva Rogerson. Eleanor Randolph Wilson. 

Minnie Leary. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, Sarah Prince Thomas. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



The Editors would ofTer their apologies to the readers of the Muse for 
the delay in the publication of this number. They hope that hereafter 
each number will appear promptly. 



The Christmas holiday was happy as always and furnished the energy 
required for preparation for the mid-year examinations which confront 
us in the middle of January. We are interestedly awaiting the result of 
the innovation of the Rector in having hour-and-a-half examinations 
instead of the three-hour ones to which we are accustomed. Many of us 
are "slow-pokes," we fear, and are rather in dread of the results, but — 



It is good news that the contract has at length been given for the heat- 
ing apparatus in the Auditorium. We had hoped that the improved 
facilities for holding entertainments and lectures would be a great stim- 
ulus to that side of school activity this session, but without apparatus for 
heating it the Auditorium has been so far practically as if it were not. 
May the contractors get to work speedily and at least let us feel that all 
will be ready next year. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



While the sentiment of these verses is quite familiar to our fellow stu- 
dents, perhaps the jingle will aid them in bearing it in mind. At any 
rate we are much obliged to the Chisel for them : 
Other papers all remind us 

We can make our own sublime, 
If our fellow schoolmates send us 
Contributions all the time. 

Here a little, there a little, 

Story, club note, song or jest, 
If you want a slick school paper, 

Each of you must do your best. 



We would acknowledge with thanks receipt of the current numbers 
of the following exchanges and express our appreciation for them : 

Acorn, Baylor Literary, Chatterbox, Chisel, Clemson College Chroni- 
cle, College of Charleston Magazine, College Messenger, Concept, Da- 
vidson College Magazine, Erskinian, Emory and Henry Era, Greensboro 
High School Magazine, Goldsboro High School Magazine, Guidon, High 
School Folio, Ivy, Maryland Collegian, Mercerian, Oracle, Quill, Bed 
and White, Tattler, Tileston Topics, Trinity Archive, Vanderbilt Ob- 
server, University of Utah Chronicle, University Magazine, Washington 
Collegian, Wesleyan, Winthrop College Journal. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Clippings From Our Exchanges and Others. 



Tvtfr. 
Mr. Wr. wooed Miss Phr. 

And he kr. 
When Miss Phr. left, then AVr. 

Kr. sr. 
Then Miss Phr.'s haughty sr. 

Slapped bold Mr. Wr.— 
Mr. Wr.'s cheek now wears a 

Painful blr. 



Nature Stories. 
Algy met a bear ; 
The bear was bulgy ; 
The bulge was Algy. 

Percy thought the lion cute ; 
He went too near the stage ; 
And so was Persecuted. 



Yet are AliKe in their Limitations. 
Who first called a woman "a cat" 

Was neither observing nor nice; 
There's a very wide difference, I'm sure, 

In the views that they hold about mice. 

Of course, both are purring and soft, 

And alike they will scratch you, but still 

A woman can't run up a tree 
Nor a cat up a milliner's bill. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Lady of Note. 

She was musical, quite, so she made her a gown 

Of organdie, cleverly planned. 
With accordion plaits running all up and down, 

And fluted to beat the band. 
She looked truly swell, and would frequently harp 

On being high-toned and all that, 
And, of course, to B natural, had to B sharp 

Enough to abide in A flat. 



Rather Personal. 

A college freshman named Hagar was constantly plagued by his 
fellow-students, perhaps because he was non-combative and excessively 
diffident. 

On Sunday when he escorted the president's daughter to chapel, the 
grinning and winking and nudging drove the poor fellow almost frantic ; 
but the climax of his misery was reached when the president arose in 
the pulpit, and in a sonorous voice announced the text, "Genesis, twenty- 
first chapter and seventeenth verse : 'What aileth thee, Hagar ?' " 



The Fly- 
Upon a sheet of Tanglefoot the trusting fly had lit, 
And now with plucky heart he fought towards freedom bit by bit. 
He stood on tiptoe in the mess and beat his gauzy wings. 
He dragged himself with frantic jerks and jumps and leaps and swings. 
He wrestled with a sticky leg with all his might and main. 
He pulled and hauled and tugged and lugged and pulled and hauled 

again. 
Across his fallen comrades he his painful progress took. 
And inch by inch he won his way by many a hook and crook. 
Until at last he sank to rest upon the paper's edge. 
It was a nine days' wonder that he reached the narrow ledge. 
With feeble gasps he licked his feet and rearranged his coat, 
And tried each wing again with low and timid note. 



The St. Mary's Muse. IT 



Then into the air he leaped, his joyous course he bore 
Straight to that sheet of Tanglefoot and waded in once more. 
A fly is just an insect and his part in life is small, 
Yet how exactly like a man he does things, after all. 

How much a man is like his shoes ! 
For instance, both a soul may lose ; 
Both have been tanned ; both are made tight, 
By cobblers both get left and right. 
Both need a mate to be complete, 
And both are made to go on feet. 
They both need healing ; oft are sold, 
And both in time will turn to mould. 
When shoes wear out, they're mended new ; 
When men wear out, they're mendead, too. 
Both have their ties and both incline, 
When polished, in the world to shine, 
And both peg out ; now would you choose 
To be a man or be his shoes ? — Ex. 



Explanatory Paraphrase. 
Much valuable literature is almost unread to-day on account of its 
obsolete phraseology. We have attempted to elucidate some of the most 
famous of these classics, in order that they may be read and loved as 
they deserve by every child who knows his letters. — Ed. 
Minute Miss Muffet placed herself on an 
Irregular terrestrial excrescence, 
Meantime did she regale her appetite 
With Borden's white coagulated essence. 

A fierce arachnid of ungainly mien 

Descended near her on his dangling thread. 

Our heroine evacuates the scene, 

Affrighted by the rampant octoped. 

— Quill. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A St. Mary's Love Story. 



Arthur, a Pretty man, went to Smith College to a dance. There he 
met a Divine Little girl named Hanna. Daniel from Davidson College 
was there also. Both were in love with Hanna, and they got on only 
Fairley Well(s) with her in the Battle of wits. 

One day Daniel and Hanna took a walk in a Wood. They came to 
a Fountain and began to amuse themselves by throwing Stones in the 
Walters. Losing her balance, Hanna fell to the Bottom. Daniel think- 
ing too much of him-Self, left her to die, but Arthur, who was in 
hiding, saw her fall and ran to the rescue. Enraged with Daniel, he 
invoked the Law and demanded Justice. Daniel Shield-ed him-Self 
by telling a round-about tale. 

Arthur and Hanna were married in the Chapel. In the front Pou 
sat Daniel, looking everything a Boyhin look. After the minister had 
pronounced the Benedict-ion they left the Chapel for her home, where 
was served a delicious luncheon of Bunn(s) and Hines preserves. They 
built a pretty Little Brown cottage between Eldridge and Rembert and 
lived happy ever afterwards. 

F. B. 

E.K. 

M. H. 



There was a fair maid of St. Mary's 
With a voice like a golden canary's ; 
She made such a noise 
That the A. and M. boys 
In alarm fled away to the prairies. 




INTERIOR OF THE CHAPEL, 1908. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
VTnr-PRFSTnFNTs J Mrs - : M - Pi «enger, Raleigh, 

VICE-i RESIDENTS, < Mrg j, p Tucker Raleigh, 

(. Mrs.Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



The interruption in the regular appearance of The Muse — this 
January number is the first that has appeared since November — has 
been the occasion of numerous solicitous inquiries on the part of alumnae 
subscribers, who for the most part have imagined that their copies had 
for some reason failed to reach them, or even that they had been merci- 
lessly scratched from the mailing list. These inquiries have been the 
only satisfactory point about the interruption, for they at least indicate 
that The Muse is looked for in some quarters and missed when it fails 
to appear. The missing number will appear during the spring; and 
while it seems impossible under present conditions to promise the 
appearance of The Muse at any definite time each month, the man- 
agement would appreciate postal-card inquiries from those interested 
if any fail to receive their copies by the last of the month. We 
know that the paper does frequently go astray, but we find it necessary 
to assume that each subscriber is receiving her copy regularly unless 
she notifies us to the contrary. We send The Muse copy by copy to 
those who have indicated in the past by sending their subscriptions or 
otherwise that they were interested in seeing the publication and valued 
it; when the subscription expires we enclose a notice to that effect in 
the paper, and trust to the interest of the subscriber to bring the re- 
newal; but so long as we have reason to think the address correct and 
the subscriber not uninterested, the paper goes out, renewal or no 
renewal. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 

For four years we have been hoping for two things: one, to see tthe 
list of alumnae subscribers to The Muse reach such a point that its claim 
to be the alumnae organ, approved by the alumnae, might seem in some 
measure justified ; the other, that the alumnae would come to be suffi- 
ciently interested to send alumnae news in for publication, as has been 
suggested at the head of this department each month since the begin- 
ning. The two matters are inter-dependent. Broader and better news 
would lead to more subscribers ; the interest of more alumnae would lead 
to better and broader news. But the growth is very slow. 

This month there are even a few more marriages of alumnae than 
usual to chronicle. As readers of The Muse have doubtless noticed, 
the accounts of these marriages of late have for the most part been con- 
fined to the insertion of the wedding invitation or announcement. This 
is not as the editors would have it, but seems inevitable in the circum- 
stances. There is no point in reproducing in The Muse an account 
of a wedding clipped from the Raleigh papers. Those accounts are 
not written from the alumnae standpoint. It would seem that each 
bride would like to have her marriage announced to those who have 
known her in her school days, with the allusions that would mean more 
to them and to her than the stereotyped forms of the daily press; 
and yet the best, almost the only way, that The Muse can obtain suitable 
accounts is through some St. Mary's friend of the bride who was present 
at the ceremony. At the wedding of almost every St. Mary's girl, old 
school friends are among the attendants, and yet to the present never 
has a special account of a wedding been offered to The Muse for publi- 
cation. The news that appears in the Alumnae Department of The 
Muse comes almost invariably from the personal correspondence of some 
one at the School, or from clippings from the press. Will not the 
alumnae come to the rescue this year and furnish some direct communi- 
cations that will tend to make the department more readable ? 

Since the foregoing was written, the very readable notice of the Dunn- 
Hughes wedding, which appears further on, has been handed us. It ii 
deeply appreciated, and we hope will lead to others. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 81 



The Scholarship Fund. 



Though active work in the campaign for raising the endowment for 
he Iredell and McKimmon Alumnae Scholarships can hardly be said to 
iave been really started as yet, the committee being blocked in its prepa- 
■ation especially by the lack of accurate alumnae lists with the present 
lames and addresses of alumnae, it is very gratifying to hear encour- 
aging reports in the matter from Miss McVea, the chairman of the 
jommittee, and Miss Dowd, the treasurer. 

Miss McVea writes from the University of Cincinnati in December : 
'I am sending you a circular and a card which will explain our plan 
r or raising the scholarship funds. My committees will soon be vigor- 
ously at work in Ealeigh, in Wilmington, in Oxford, and in whatever 
jfeher points I can reach." Miss Dowd reports that while the contribu- 
ions to the fund come in slowly, they are nevertheless gradually mount- 
ng up, and she hopes to be able to give an encouraging report to the 
ilumnae on Alumnae Day, May 12th, the sixty-sixth anniversary of the 
jstablishing of the School. 

The committee's circular and card are printed here for the benefit of 
;hose who have not seen them. The circular answers certain questions 
hat have been asked with regard to proposed details for the use of the 
:und. 



The Committee Circular. 

"At a meeting held during Commencement week, May, 1907, the 
3t. Mary's Alumnae decided to urge all former students and all other 
oersons interested in the increased usefulness of the School to cooperate 
m plans for the raising of an endowment fund. Never have the oppor- 
tunities for effective work been, better. St. Mary's is now the largest 
Episcopal school for girls in the United States, and the trustees and 
officers are determined that its educational facilities shall be unsur- 
passed. To enlarge its departments and to strengthen its work a per- 
manent endowment is necessary. We believe that all St. Mary's girls 
will be glad of the opportunity to aid in this work. 

"The alumnae further decided that the first money raised should be 
in the form of two scholarships, to be called the Mary Iredell and the 



2§ The St. Mary's Muse. 

Kate McKimmon Scholarships, in honor of two women who have given 
the best years of their lives to St. Mary's. The interest of the Mary 
Iredell Scholarship is to be used at once for the benefit of some student; 
the interest of the Kate McKimmon fund is, at the discretion of the 
committee, to be used as a retiring fund, the principal eventually to be- 
come a part of the endowment. The proposed plan is as follows : 
2 (or more) persons to give $500 
5 (or more) persons to give $200 
10 (or more) persons to give $100 
20 (or more) persons to give $50 
4-0 (or more) persons to give $25 
100 (or more) persons to gi^e $10 
200 (or more) persons to give $5 
"To be paid in cash or in three yearly- installments. 

Emilie W. McVea, 
Chairman of the C ommittee for Scholarship Funds." 



The Subscription Card, 

"Date 

"I wish to contribute to the Mary Iredell and the Kate McKimmon 

Scholarships the sum of $ ; payable in 

To be divided as follows: $ to the first-named scholarship; 

$ __._ to the second. 

(Signed) - 

"In case the contributor wishes to give to only one scholarship: 

"I wish to contribute to the - Scholarship 

the sum of $ _ ; payable in 

(Signed) A 



The Cameron Memorial Pulpit. 



With the placing of the Cameron Memorial Pulpit in the Chapel in 
ITovember, the last of the larger pieces of furniture for the enlarged and 
renewed Chapel is provided and the Chapel now stands with its furnish- 
ings as complete and tasty a place for the Church's services as any school 



The St. Mary's Muse. 2S 



could wish. Not that the opportunities for memorial gifts of love are 
exhausted, for there yet remain the places for eight memorial windows, 
and the stoles and other vestments of the minister are yet to be provided, 
but these will come naturally and soon, and without them the Chapel is 
still practically complete. 

The pulpit, which is the artistic work of The Gorham Co., New York, 
is hexagonal in shape, of oak, handsomely carved, with brass trimmings, 
and blends with the other furniture. In the center of the front panel 
is a figure of the Good Shepherd bearing home the missing sheep, an 
exquisite piece of wood carving. The memorial tablet is inscribed : "In 
Memory of Paul Carrington Cameron. Born July 18, 1892. Entered 
Into Rest September 8, 1895. Erected Through the Means of a Devise 
of His Grandmother — Anne Ruffin Cameron." 

The half-tone reproduction of a recent photograph of the Chapel 
interior, which is published in this Muse, gives a very good idea of the 
present appearance of the chancel with its furnishings. 



The Death of Prof. Albert A. MacK- 



The loving thoughts of many friends of their St. Mary's days have 
been with Mr. and Mrs. Mack during the past few months, in which 
Mr. Mack has been struggling with a dread disease, from which he was 
relieved on January 5th ; and these friends now grieve with Mrs. Mack 
in her and their loss. 

We print below appreciations of Professor Mack from the papers of 
Syracuse, New York, where his work lay in his last years, and from 
Miss McVea, whose co-laborer he was at St. Mary's : 

"Albert August Mack, associate professor of piano and theory of music in the 
College of Fine Arts of Syracuse University, died yesterday afternoon at the Hos- 
pital of the Good Shepherd. He underwent an operation for a cancer three months 
ago and his condition was considered hopeless from the first. For several days his 
death had been expected at almost any time. 

"Although he had been at Syracuse University nearly three years, Professor Mack 
was better known by his songs and piano pieces. He was a fellow student at the 
Stuttgart Conservatory with Edward Stillman Kelly, who wrote the music for Ben Hur, 
and with Dean George A. Parker of the College of Fine Arts. He came to Syracuse 
from Hollins, Va. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Professor Mack was bora in Brooklyn fifty-four years ago, and after his gradua- 
tion from the Stuttgart Conservatory he became well known as a composer. 
Besides his wife, he leaves a number of relatives in New England. 

The funeral service was held at Grouse College and the body v. as 1 to 

Groton, Conn. 



"The death of Prof. Albert Mack, for the last three years a valued member of the 
musical faculty of the University, is a severe loss to the music forces of this city I 
and to the many other music centers of this country and Europe, where his work as \ 
a composer and teacher was known. Just reaching the zenith of his power, Pro- I 
fessor Mack had already acquired a host of friends among those who appreciate the I 
best in music. As a composer he was unusually gifted. His many years in Europe 
developed and placed on its proper plane the innate genius of the man so that his j 
writing during recent years merited a place among the works of the great contempo- 
rary composers. "The Song of the Shulamite Maid," taken from the second chapter 
of the "Song of Solomon," was finished by Mr. Mack last year, and in the eyes of I 
authorities it is one of the greatest arias ever written. Edgar Stillman Kelley, a 
feliow student of Professor Mack at the Stuttgart Conservatory, is now engaged i 
orchestrating the work. 

"As a writer he will be missed by the whole musical world, for his was an ability 
which will not soon pass into oblivion; but to those who were privileged to know 
him as a friend or as a teacher the loss will be doubly felt. He was by nature 
very quiet and unassuming, and in his every word and act reflected the polished 
gentleman and true friend, ever ready to help, kind and sympathetic to all. 

"The following complete list of Professor Mack's compositions has been furnished 
me by G. Schirmer & Company: 

"Songs — 'April,' 'Divine Awe,' 'The Enchantress,' 'Forever and a Day,' 'The 
Hermit Thrush,' 'My Lady's Hair,' 'Nocturne,' '0 Love, Return,' 'One Summer 
Night,' 'The Samisen,' 'Shy as a Squirrel,' 'Spring Twilight,' 'Wake, Wake,' 'White 
Nights,' 'The Song of the Shulamite,' 'The Rider,' one chorus for women's voices 
entitled 'October,' the same number of male voices, and a chorus for mixed voices 
entitled 'Good Night.' 

"Church music — 'Ave Verum,' 'Why Seek Ye the Living Among the Dead?' 'Jesus, 
Word of God Incarnate.' 

"Piano music — Bourree, Op. 10; Mazurka, Op. 16." 



On the eve of the Epiphany, Albert Mack, teacher and artist, was 
released from the burden of his suffering and entered into the life 
eternal. For many years Mr. Mack was the head of the department of 
music at St. Mary's, and never has St. Mary's had a teacher who pos- 
sessed a higher reverence for art or a stronger consciousness of the dignity 
of his profession. Trained in the best schools of Germany, he was im- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

bued with the broad, intellectual German ideas of art. To him music 
was not merely an appeal to the emotions, voicing the sensations and 
the passions ; it was intellectual as well. That music alone was highest 
in which the sensuous and passionate elements were held in restraint by 
the intellect. Music was not a pastime; it was a devotion, a consecra- 
tion. Exacting in his demands upon himself, he was not satisfied until 
his renderings of the compositions of the masters were as perfect as he 
could, by arduous practice, make them. He could not tolerate inaccu- 
rate or too highly colored interpretations. His dominant qualities as a 
pianist were a liquid, singing tone, a delicate appreciation of the finer 
emotions, and a vigorous grasp of the intellectual meaning of the com- 
position. His ideals for his pupils were high. He allowed no careless 
work ; he permitted no sentimental music. He knew the highest and 
he taught the highest. Fever once did he yield to the demand for 
merely popular music on the part of the public and his students. Those 
whom he taught and those who knew him as friend and associate, 
learned from him higher ideals of the province of all art, and they 
thank him for his faithfulness. 

Mr. Mack, moreover, was creative as well as interpretive. Those of 
us who listened in the Chapel at St. Mary's to the splendid harmonies 
of his setting of "Forward be our watchword" and to his "I heard a 
sound of voices," — a hymn full of awe and reverence — were not sur- 
prised to learn that he was becoming widely known as a composer. 
During the past few years recognition came to him from all sides: 
from the University of Syracuse, where he taught; from publishers; 
from the public; and from fellow-artists and music lovers everywhere. 
His songs are characterized by delicate grace and by a haunting, elusive 
melody ; his religious compositions are stately in movement and reverent 
in conception. In his latest music his genius found its freest and high- 
est expression. He has passed from us in the early days of his achieve- 
ment, but he has left to the world some songs that will not die, and to his 
friends the memory of a life exquisite in purity of purpose and in faith- 
fulness to its ideals. Emilie W. McVea, 

The University of Cincinnati. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Weddings Among the Alumnae. 



Dunn-Hughes. 

Doctor and Mrs. Francis W. Hughes 
request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter . 

Octavia Winder 

and 

Mr. William Dunn, Junior, 

on Saturday afternoon the fourteenth of December, 

at half after five o'clock, 

Christ Church, 

New Bern, North Carolina. 

In turning over the leaves of the St. Mary's Annual for 1903 we see a picture of 
Octavia Hughes (not at all like her) with this inscription, "Procrastination is the 
thief of time," and remembering her failing and her mighty struggles, we wonder if 
she was on time for the wedding. A little bird has whispered that punctuality is one 
of Mr. Dunn's many virtues, so we hope for the best. Farther on in the Annual, 
under the head of "Ourselves seen as other see us " we find this verse : 
"Tis not a lip or eye, we beauty call, 
But the joint force and full results of all" 

Octavia Hughes. 

and immediately there comes to us a pleasing memory of girlish grace and refinement, 
embodying a character of depth and truth and beauty. 

The New Bern Journal tells us it was a beautiful wedding and the bride's dress 
was a white lace robe, veil caught with orange blossoms, one ornament a handsome 
necklace of pearls, and a bouquet of bride's roses. Mary Hughes was maid of honor, 
dressed in white net with a bouquet of white chrysanthemums; andlittle Miss Harriet 
Stover Dunn (Emma Stevenson's little girl) was the dainty flower girl with her arms 
full of white carnations. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Francis M. Osborne, 
of Charlotte, and there were many friends both at the Church, and at the brilliant 
reception given afterwards at the home of the bride's father, Dr. Francis W. Hughes 

"The polished Octavia," as she was called in her school girl days, is a dear daugh- 
ter of St. Mary's, and the school sends best wishes for the happiness of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Dunn, Junior, in their new home, New Bern, North Carolina. D. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 

Wood-Shernll. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Jones Sherrill 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Daisy Ednei 

to 

Mr. Bernard Mayton Wood, 

on Saturday, December the twenty-eighth, 

one thousand nine hundred and seven, 

Asheville, North Carolina. 

"Daisy Sherrill" is the first of the girls of last year to embark on the 

"matrimonial sea." The Muse offers its best wishes. 



KJuttz-Craige. 

Mr. Burton Craige 

requests the honor of your presence at the marriage of his sister 

Josephine Branch 

to 

Dr. Clarence Kluttz, 

on the evening of Wednesday the eighteenth of December, 

nineteen hundred and seven, at half after six o'clock, 

St. Luke's Church, Salisbury, North Carolina. 



Hanes-Robinson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hall Robinson 

request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Mary Leigh 

and 

Mr. Alexander Stephen Hanes, 

on Wednesday the eighteenth day of December, nineteen hundred 

and seven, at twelve o'clock, 

Christ Church, 

Elizabeth City, North Carolina. 

"Mary Robinson's" friends are still numerous at St. Mary's, where 

she was a student no longer ago than 1905. Her talent in art was her 

special claim to distinction in those days, and many thanks did The 

Muse owe her for the generous use of that talent. She is a member of 

Gamma Beta Sigma. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Kuffin-Nash. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Simpson Nash 

invite you to be present at the marriage of their daughter 

Annie Gray 

to 

Mr. Allen Jones Kuffin, 

on the evening of Wednesday the first of January, 

nineteen hundred and eight, at half after seven o'clock, 

Calvary Church, 

Tarborough, North Carolina. 



Syme-Haywood. 

Doctor and Mrs. Hubert Haywood 

request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Harriet 

to 

Mr. George Frederick Syme, 

on the afternoon of Wednesday the fifteenth of January, 

nineteen hundred and eight, at five o'clock, 

Christ Church, 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 



Bromley-Sanborr). 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Sanborn 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Gertrude Elaine 

to 

Mr. David S. Bromley, 

on Wednesday, January the twenty-second, 

nineteen hundred and eight, 

Buena Vista, Virginia. 

"Miss Gertrude" is very pleasantly remembered at St. Mary's, where 

she assisted her mother in the Voice Department from 1904 to 190(5. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 

Wilson-Love. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Gr. Love 

requests the honor of your presence at the marriage of her daughter 

Annie Stednian 
to 
Mr. Frank Leland Wilson, 
■ on the afternoon of Wednesday the twenty-ninth of January 
at half after four o'clock, 
Central Methodist Church, 
Ealeigh, North Carolina. 
"Miss Love is a charming and popular young woman of Ealeigh, a cul- 
tivated musician, with many friends. Mr. Wilson is a popular and suc- 
3essful traveling man, who has spent much time in Ealeigh and who has 
i very large number of friends here and throughout the State." 
Miss Love is a graduate of St. Mary's, Class of 1900. 



Murray-Connor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Groves Connor 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Kate Bronson 

to 

Mr. Hugh Hargrave Murray, 

on Wednesday the twenty-second day of January, 

nineteen hundred and eight, 

at half after eight 

St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, 

Wilson, North Carolina. 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
It is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



TON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



'It hain't no use to grumble and complain ; 

It's jest as cheap and easy to rejoice. 
When God sorts out the weather and sends rain, 

W'y rain's my choice." — Riley. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL 0! 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



HE BOY! AN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Cosiumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILBE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



[art-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

estof everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Conk Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 



'The Little Store/ 



W. C. STMACH'S EONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLB STREET 

KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



From the Maryland Collegian: 

THE EDITOR'S REWARD. 
"What do you get for all this work ?" 

I was asked the other day ; 
"O, nothing at all, but thanks," I said, 
"Our glory is our pay." 

Then straightway 'round the corner came 
Some classmates on the run, 

And, advancing towards my helpless self, 
Said, "Gee, this issue's bum." 



M.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Uselhe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO, 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



SALYATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mai'y's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

"WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHOEN Co., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware, 

Repairing promptly done. 



JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY; 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



THE WAY TO TAKE IT. 

Dis de way ter take it 

In a worl' er loss : 
Ef yon can't swim the river 

Let de ynther feller cross ! 
Maybe w'en he swim it — 

Stemmin' er de tide — 
He'll light on a ferryboat 

On de yuther side ! 



HINES BROS, LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N. C, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists op North Carolina 
Raleigh, N. C. 



H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

ROBT. SIMPSON, Drugs ^iet e Ir u tS,et. 



ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 


ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


121 Fayetteville Street. 


/MftDWARDS^. 
fg^BROUGHTONi^) 
rf/PRLNTLNG COAW 
«l /i ? *i-6IGH. ALr . 11/ 


J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Dk. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 






H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 


PESCUD^S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



No use in sighin' — 

Tellin' of yo' woe ! 
Ef you can't swim de river, 

You must let de river go ! 

— Atlanta Constitution. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, X, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 


BARRETT & THOMPSON, 


Fkancis P. Venable, President 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


Architects and Engineers, 
raleigh, n. c. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO,, 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 


ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital 815,000. Surplus 150,000. Deposits over 
$750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 


Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Safety, Courtesy and Accommodation to 
Patrons. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 

W.N. Jon ks Vice-President. 

F. H. Bkiggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit, Boxes i" Fireand Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate com. Absolutely 
safe place lor keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance a i d Investments. 

Raleigh, N. U. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100.000.00 
100.000.00 

1,175,000.00 
1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for (he promptand proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lectures, Prayer Desks, Litany 
De sks. Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



MAY THERE BE OTHERS LIKE HIM! 

From The Quill (Staten Island Academy) : 

There is a new boy at the Academy this year, who seems to represent 
a type hitherto unknown. Without the slightest provocation he secured 
several "ads." for The Quill. He is generally a spectator at foot-ball 
practice, although he is not on the team. We could wish that the rest 
of us would do for spirit what this extraordinary fellow calls "fun." 



WEATHERS & FERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteviiie St., Raleigh, N. C. 


HARDEN'S LIVERY 
Always Ready. 


" Let there he l'glit " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineeis. 


ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 






D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 
Fancy Groceries, 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St, 






Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dent st. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 


J. R. FEKRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best it every thi ntr in our line. 

22 Fayetteviiie Street. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORHEN FURNITURE CO 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 


127 Fayetteviiie Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



School Calendar, !907-'08. 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1908. 



January 2, Thursday. School duties resumed at 7. p. m. 

January 17-22. Mid-year Examinations. 

February, 1, Saturday. 8 p. m. 

February, 8, Saturday. 8 p. m. 

February, 15, Saturday. 8 p. m. 

February, 22, Saturday. Washingtons Birthday. Half-holiday. 

February, 29, Saturday. 8 p. m. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINK RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington. Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington. Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga. Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah. Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. . 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South- West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. GATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD F. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent Second Vice-President 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



linos,. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School, 



Raleigh, n. c. 



(for girls and young women), 



65th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1007. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS, 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 2:;. 1908, 



offers 




?. THE MUSIC school 
$. HIE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

5. 7tf# PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



Twentv-nve Members in the Faculty 



Well Ft 




Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
a the Social and Christian side of Education urithoiit slight 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



e &bmc 



I 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



VALENTINE NUMBER. 



February, 1908. No. 5 



The Picture. 



SEHENA COBIA BAILEY. 



"I have a picture — " 

Ah, they smile, or scoffing ask, "Whom by? 

We knew you for no devotee of art!" 

''Yes, and yet no; right, but in part," 

I answer. "I know few pictures — those few well — 

But none like this has cast a spell 

Of such rare loveliness, human, yet 'most divine. 

And this art gem, surpassing fair, is mine. 

I must not tell you, though, the name 

Of him that made the picture; but his fame 

Lives as the greatest of our race; 

Yet only he and I have seen the beauty of that face. 

And one thing more; the picture, priceless, rare, 

Is copied from a work ten thousand times more fair!' 

I, smiling, left them to explain 

My riddle. Yet I fear they try in vain. 

But, musing, to myself I whispered low, 

"Alas! these critics, sages, little know 

How true I spoke. For that fair face, 

With woman's charm and yet a child's sweet grace, 

No art can e'er surpass, no power remove; 

'Twas pictured on my heart by him called Love!" 



The Tables Turned. 



She was seven and He was ten. For a month the valentines had 
been displayed in Hoskin's window, and every morning the sturdy little 
figure, trudging along to school, would stop to flatten her little nose 
against the pane to gaze with longing blue eyes at the most beautiful one 
of all, which had not yet been sold. A big, red heart, surrounded by 
cupids; and oh! greatest joy of all, in the middle of the heart was a 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



beautiful poem, full of love md oh ! how true : "As sure as the gra& 
grows round the stump, you're my darling sugar lump," which she han 
laboriously spelled out. Every morning her tiny heart was filled witljj 
dread for fear it would be sold, for the pennies in her bank had not ye 
amounted to the mighty sum of ten cents. 

Of course he would know who sent it and understand, for only tha 
morning, didn't he lick old Tommy Jones for calling her "Tow-head' lt| 
and making her cry? And the day before hadn't he given her a whol»| 
apple with only one bite gone ? He was always so good, too, about let | 
ting her chew his chewing gum at recess. And she felt that the cheerfu. 
grin on his freckled face was meant only for her. If the valentine was 
sold by to-morrow her heart would break, for her mother had promisee 
her a whole nickel if she would stay in all that afternoon and amuse 
baby. Of course she wouldn't mind, since it would be for him, and, 
he — such a splendid hero — had been so good to her. 

Valentine's Day had come! With her ten precious pennies clasped 
tightly in her chubby hand, she advanced timidly into the store. She 
had never been shopping by herself before, but no one could know aboul 
this — not even mother. 

The clerk in the store saw two timid blue eyes raised to his and a 
pudgy finger pointing to the big red heart in the window. 

With her precious burden clasped closely to her heart she went on to 
school, stepping carefully lest she fall and harm it in some way. At 
last the longed-for time had come. First to come into the school-room, 
with beating heart she tiptoed across the room and stowed it in hia; 
much-bethumbed arithmetic. Creeping back to her own desk she waited 
tremblingly, pretending to study. How surprised he would be and how 
delighted ! Of course He would know at once that She sent it. 

The big bell rang and the other children came trooping in. She was 
afraid to look that way, but she knew just how pleased he would be 
when he saw it. Presently a loud whisper was heard across the room, 
"Hi! look what Billy's got!" "Ain't he sissy — getting a valentine 
from a girl !" "What does it say, Billy ?" Then, "Aw I how sickey !" 
came her exalted hero's voice, "just like a girl." And with a very red 
face He tore Cupid to smithereens, and tossed the beautiful verse into 
the trash box. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 8 

Across the room, a little mouth quivered, a pair of big, blue eyes 
[lied with tears, a curly head was hidden in the desk, and that afternoon 
i very disillusioned little girl sobbed broken-he artedly in her mother's 

rms. 

******* 

Twelve years had passed. Another February had rolled around, and 
he valentines were again displayed in Hoskin's window. This time 
he clerk behind the counter did not look down into a pair of timid, deep 
>lue eyes, but instead, up into a pair of frank, handsome brown ones, 
kid this time the valentine was really and truly the most beautiful one 
|n the store, all flowers and cupids and little love-ditties, and the price 
narked on the back was $10. 

Another Valentine's Day had come, and in front of the crackling fire 
In a cozy library a graceful girl was laughing, with mischievous eyes, 
it a rather moody young man surveying her, with his elbow on the man- 
el piece. She would not be serious. He had never before realized 
[low beautiful, how bewitching she was. But how could she treat him 
his way if she cared % His thoughts were on the Future, but hers flew 
jack twelve years before, and she saw a broken-hearted little girl weep- 
ing bitterly in her mother's arms. 

The door-bell rang and the maid entered carrying a big box. "Another 
Valentine, Miss." Yes, it was his and she must know that only he could 
have picked out such appropriate verses. She tore off the wrappings 
While he watched her from the corner of his eyes. Of course she would 
understand, for the valentine expressed exactly what lie could not. A 
low ripple of laughter roused him to anger. Didn't she have any 
heart ? "Oh, how sickey !" she cried, as she leaned back laughing, and 
the valentine — Cupid and all — slipped to the floor to be heartlessly 
chewed up by her fox-terrier ! And glancing at his face she tasted the 
sweetness of revenge. But in his dispondency he did not notice that 
as she leaned over to pat the dog she carefully rescued Cupid from de- 
struction. 

Ida J. Rogeeson, 
Maet C. Shuford. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Leap Year in the Stone Age. 



There was a lusty maiden bold, 

Her mind on business intent; 
One early morning — freezing cold — 

Out to the mountain cliff she went. 

II. 

With rocky chisel in her hand 

She hammered on (oh! wondrous Art) 

Until from out that solid sand 

She had exhumed a granite heart. 

III. 

At night, when all the warriors brave 
Were gathered there upon the plain, 

The maiden stood before her cave 

And whirled that heart with might and main! 

IV. 

It whizzed right thro' the still night air, 
And as her aim was strong and true, 

She hit her sweetheart, I declare, 
And bowled him over, too. 

V. 

Thus modestly she chose a man, 

(Most luckily he wasn't dead! ) 
She raised him gently by the hand, 

And on the spot the two were wed. 



M. R. duB. 



Valentine's Day In 2808. 



MARGARET ROSALIE DTJ BOSE. 



I had just received a wireless from Anna 32845 (of course we have, 
in this enlightened age, given up the custom of having a surname, and| 
use numbers instead), my life-long friend and President-in-Chief of 
the United Women of the Western Hemisphere, saying she was on her 
way to see me about some important business. I had just arranged all 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



ly auto-kodak films, and records so that every movement and word of 
lis famous woman should be preserved, when her air motor lit gently 
n the roof and she came in. With an air of unusual excitement she 
ut a musty manuscript into my hand and begged me to read it. I saw 
t a glance that it was a most valuable paper, describing the customs of 
he ancients in about 1908, when different languages (as many as ten, 

have been told) were spoken on our globe, and intercourse with Mars 
ad not even been established. Anna translated one passage for me. 

"Mrs. Grimier gave a charming valentine party on Thursday, Feb- 
uary 14th. As it was leap year the ladies escorted the gentlemen, and 
tiuch amusement was the result." 

That was an interesting fact historically, but what had it to do 
nth us ? 

"Don't you see," said Anna, "that is exactly what we can do to cele- 
>rate the 800th anniversary of the Universal Women's Association. 
Che Eastern Hemisphere has fixed the meeting place at the excavation 
»f ancient Paris" — but here I interrupted. 

'In these enlightened days the women always take the men, so there 
vill be nothing new in that." 

She almost smiled. "I have just finished a condensed and pre- 
iigested course in Ancient History, and I find that Leap Year simply 
neans the reversing of the usual custom. I suppose that is how we got 
mr idea of turning our air ships to the right, in the morning, and to 
the left in the afternoon. Now we would simply reverse our custom 
and let the men carry us over to the Paris ruins." 

Then we discussed all the danger of accidents, all the women were to 
wear their automatic life preservers, and be ready to rush to the rescue 
of any man if danger threatened, and in every way we were to act as 
though we were living about nine hundred years ago. 

At last the important day came. The Atlantic was in a continual 
shadow from the millions of cars flying over it, some of them actually 
guided by the least timid of the men. The day was to be delightfully 
spent in the cultivation of humor (an ancient virtue that is fast disap- 
pearing in these days of continual brain-labor), the reading of papers 
on this custom of our ancestors of observing "St. Valentine's Day" and 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 
1 

"Leap year" — and for recreation, a prize was offered to the numbe:^ 
who composed one thousand unsolvable problems in the shortest time £ 
Of course there were some accidents. When the senior members wen" 
giving us the theory of humor — and some of them even smiled for us— 11( 
one weak-minded young man was overcome with excitement, and laughec 
aloud. Instantly two million eye-glassed eyes were fixed upon him, and 
he retired abashed to the protection of his wife. 

An interesting paper was read on the ancients' display of emotion:! 
and their cultivation of one especial emotion called love. The moon IB 
light seemed to have some strange influence over this emotion, but o. 
course that was before they could make the trip to the moon and baclia 
in two days, and had summer air resorts there. 

Then a very threatening cloud came up, so after a hasty meal of tw<IE 
tablets apiece (one containing a seven course dinner, and the other twf 
quarts of cocoa-dine) we started home. The sky was dark and lower j! 
ing, and our motor meters showed the wind speed to be ninety miles 
an hour. Each car started its own automatic electric fans, and thou ( ( 
sands of these in opposition to the wind soon lessened its power. The 
air was so crowded that there was much danger of collision. Several 
men screamed and fainted dead away — there was a sound of gritting 
steel, every woman put on her life preserver, and stood with strained 
muscles waiting to rescue the men when suddenly — 

******* 

"Well, Mary, you certainly have taken a nap ! Look what Alex senl 
you !" 

I rubbed my eyes in amazement. There stood my small sister with 
her arms full of white carnations, and I realized that it was St. Valen- 
tine's Day, and, thank goodness, the date was only 1908 ! 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Sakah Prince Thomas, Editor. 



In spite of her plucky attempt to keep up her work Florence Beck- 
with has been obliged to give up and go back home to Jacksonvil^ 
Florida, to recuperate, to the deep regret of all her friends. Though 



The St. Maky's Muse. 7 

ie had such a protracted sickness before the holidays she was back on 
me, only to have further trouble develop, this time with her ear. Her 
lother came up to be with her and was here for several weeks. We all 
tope that the convalescence will be rapid and thorough. 

St. Mary's in the person of both teachers and present day girls, had 
ie opportunity to extend a warm greeting this month to several of her 
Id girls who have made more or less brief visits to friends here. Mat- 
te Hunter, of Portsmouth, stopped for a day or two with her sister, 
lelen, on her way to Mississippi to spend the winter with her aunt, 
Irs. Hawkins, there. And one afternoon there were with us at the 
ame time: Gertrude Winston, of Durham; Cecie Capehart, of Avoca; 
Jophie Wood, of Edenton; Belle Nash, of Tarboro, and Mrs, Allen 
Muffin (Annie Gray Nash), of Hillsboro. It is always a pleasure to 
lave the old girls come back, and it keeps them in touch with the new 
£rls and with the present work of St. Mary's. 

! The recent special session of the Legislature not only afforded some 
rf the girls an opportunity to see something of how the laws are made by 
>rief visits with the teachers to the capital, but gave many of them 
glimpses of friends who were in Ealeigh on business or pleasure con- 
nected with the Legislature. Among others, Lila Justice, Eliza Morton 
Ind Wilhelmina Harlow were all especially happy in seeing their 
Darents. 

The opening of the Easter Term brought us two new friends, Janie 
Patrick, of Chocowinity, and Mary Norman, of Littleton. Josephine 
Kilmer has also recovered from her recent illness and taken up her duties 
^gain, and Elva Crowell, of Newton, who has been boarding in town, 
has come up to be a boarder. We are glad to welcome them all. 

Ha Eountree and Cornie Eairley have gotten a little ahead of the 
rest of us in February, for they have had another visit home. Ila 
Rountree was in Wilmington for a few days for medical treatment and 
is now back restored in health, and Cornie Eairley, after accompanying 
fier father and brother to her home in Monroe for a few days, is with 
^is again prepared to continue to give us sweet music. 

Mrs. Wilson, of Princeton, N. J., is visiting her sister, Mrs. Howe, 
in Ealeigh, to the great delight of her daughter, Nell Wilson. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



Mary Wells, Sadie Thomas, Caroline Parker, Martha Byrd Spruill 
and several others have enjoyed visits from home-folks during the 
month. 

Mr. Hodgson has just finished one of his periodical visits to the 
school, which we all enjoy so much. He played for us frequently in 
the parlor at recreation hour in the evenings, and we miss him very 
much when he goes. 

There was a goodly attendance of St. Mary's teachers and pupils at 
the Piano Kecital of Mr. Walter Spry at the Baptist University on Feb- 
ruary 3d. On account of the lack of heat in the new Auditorium the 
usual course of lectures and recitals at St. Mary's has had to be omitted 
this winter, and this recital of Mr. Spry was thrown open to the mem- 
bers of the School, as one of our own course. 

A party of the musically inclined greatly enjoyed Mr. Wade Brown's 
lecture on the "Development of the Oratorio" at Baney Hall on the 
afternoon of the 13th. Mr. Brown gave the lecture as a sort of prepara- 
tion for the rendering of "The Messiah," which will be given later im 
the season. 

A few of the girls enjoyed the lecture of Miss Hill, of Columbia 
University, on "The Kindergarten" at Raney Hall on the afternoon of 
the 3d. Mrs. F. L. Stevens entertained the members of the faculties 
of the three woman's schools at a morning reception in Miss Hill's 
honor on the same day. 

Rebecca Wood and Janie Sims assisted at Mrs. Benehan Cameron's 
party on the 4th. 

The girls have been more fortunate than the teachers in escaping the 
prevalent "grippe." Mr. Lay had quite an attack, and after him, Mrs. 
Lay and the children, one and all, fell victims. Mrs. Turner, Mile. 
LaLoge and Miss Cribbs have also each had a turn. Fortunately every 
one is now about restored. 

We are all delighted at the return of Mrs. Sheib after her five weeks 
absence in Asheville. We have missed her greatly and rejoice with her 
that she is feeling; so much better. 



The St. Marys Muse. 



Mr. Lay spent Sunday, the 9th, in Wilmington as the guest of Eev. 
Mr. Hogue, the Kector of St. James's. He preached there Sunday 
morning and evening and had many pleasant visits to and greetings 
from the Wilmington alumna? and friends of St. Mary's. On Monday 
afternoon he met with the alumna? at the Parish House and had a long 
informal talk with them over the work at St. Mary's and plans for the 
present and future. On his way home Mr. Lay stopped over night in 
Groklsboro at Mr. Frank Borden's. 

Miss Lee was called to Greensboro in the latter part of January to 
be with her brother, Mr. Ed Lee, who is critically ill there. She is now 
back at her duties, but is still very uneasy about her brother, who con- 
tinues in a critical condition. 

We learn with deep regret that Grace Ward will not be able to come 
back to school this session. She is still unable to be up and her doctor 
will keep her in bed in Eichmond for a few weeks longer, and she will 
then go to Florida for the rest of the winter. 

We hope that nothing will interfere with Elizabeth Waddill's plan to 
return to St. Mary's in March and resume her Senior studies and grad- 
uate with her class. She has been studying and keeping up her work 
in Newark, 1ST. J., where she is with her aunt. 

The savory odors which come from the Grill Room when the Do- 
mestic Science classes are "demonstrating" there, make the rest of us 
all wish heartily that we might share at least a part of their course. 

St. Mary's has enjoyed greatly a good many of her Wednesday after- 
noon receptions, but none more than that of January twenty-second. 
On that clay the Lieutenant-Governor, the Speaker of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, and a number of the other members of the Legislature, 
accepted the invitation extended by Mr. Lay to attend the reception. 
Assisting Mr. and Mrs. Lay and the Faculty in receiving were the mem- 
bers of the Junior and Senior classes. Those serving were: Lyman 
Grimsley, Lila Justice and Eliza Morton. With Lieutenant-Governor 
Winston and Mr. Lay as a center the afternoon could not fail to be one 
of the greatest pleasure. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Back- 
Back from the breakfasts where one may be late, 

Nor dodge through some least-noticed door. 
Back from the turkey, and pudding, and cake; 

From the coffee that steams as we pour. 

Back from the place where we seem as we are; 

Where we fuss, and are selfish, and love. 
Back where we do as we please with no fear 

That the head of the house will reprove. 

Back from the parties, and all the good times 

That make up the holiday joys. 
Back from the sisters, and mothers, and brothers; 

For five months back from the boys. 

Back where our freedom is chopped into bits 

By the ringing of bell and of gong. 
Back 'neath the terrible fear of the six 

On those tests we will have before long. 

Back where our life runs a race with our time; 

Where every one hurries like mad. 
Back to it all: and some one asserts, 

"Deep down in your hearts you are glad." 

'Tis hard to believe, but perhaps it is so; 

For, aside from the worry and strife, 
We find in our work a queer happiness, too, 

Which gives us a reason for life. 

Ella Battle in the State Normal Magazine. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club., 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 
Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 
Eva Rogerson. Eleanor Randolph Wilson. 

Minnie Leary. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, Sarah Prince Thomas. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL. 



At last the much dreaded examinations are over and for the present 
that subject is out of our minds. We are now looking forward to Lent, 
which, although it comes a little later than usual this year, is always a. 
welcome season at St. Mary's, for it brings with it a quietness that is 
very refreshing after the strenuous life of the weeks before. 



The work on the Annual has begun, and let us hope that it will go 
forward rapidly, now that the editors can give more of their time to it. 
The plan for the Annual is slightly different from what it was last year, 
but it is the opinion of the editors that it will not be less interesting or 
attractive because of that. 



We are glad to see an awakened interest in athletics again. This in- 
terest has been lying dormant for most of the year, and we hope that the 
enthusiasm with which it has at last showed itself will be kept up by 
rivalry. At present all the active manifestations seem to be shown by 
only one club. Wake up, club number two, and get to work ! 



12 The St. Maky's Muse. 

The Muse acknowledges with thanks the receipt of the following ex- 
changes : 

Acorn, College Message, Concept, Davidson College Magazine, Ers- 
Jcinian, Guilford Collegian, High School Folio, Hollins Quarterly, Hor- 
ner Cadet, Orange and Blue, Horae Scholasticce, Oracle, Palmetto, 
Quill, Red and White, Reveille, State Normal Magazine, Tattler, Trin- 
ity Archive, University Magazine, University of Utah Chronicle, Wash- 
ington Collegian, Wesleyan, Western Maryland College Monthly, Win- 
ihrop College Journal. 



In a review of the college and school magazines of North Carolina, the 
Exchange Editor of The University Magazine thus pays his respects to 
the publications of the "female colleges" : 

The female colleges of the State have been well represented in six neat, entertaining 
magazines entitled respectively: The Chatterbox, St. Mary's Muse, The Acorn, 
The State Normal Magazine, The Ivy, and The College Message, and the ladies are 
entertaining, as they always are. Further, they do not deserve the criticism that 
they should make their literature more distinctive of their life. All of the maga- 
zines are filled with happenings and crises which the college girl has to face in the 
stern battle of life. And it warms my heart to read of the full joyous life of the 
school girl, for I am doomed to lead a quiet hum-drum life in a place infested with 
men. The magazines are all timely and interesting, so well do they portray the life 
of the modern school girl. Of them all the St. Mary's Muse is most attractive in 
appearance, and since beauty counts for much in the world of women, I would say 
that the St. Mary's Muse is the pick of the flock, and yet it is mighty hard to 
determine which really is my choice. But the coin falls heads as I wanted it to 
fall and The Muse is my choice. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Clippings From Our Exchanges and Others. 



Teacher cranky, 

Pupils few, 
Questions flying, 

Zero too. 
What's the matter? 

Don't you know? 
Tuesday morning, 

Always so. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

Some Dew(?) Upon Them Yet. 

I sent my girl one year a valentine; 

Six dozen roses — they were quite divine. 

The way she thanked me — 

Will I e'er forget? 

She murmured, "There's some 'dew' upon them yet!" 

Dear girl ! She never guessed how nearly right 

She struck it, on that February night — 

That was three years ago. Say, will I e'er forget? 

"Nay, nay, Pauline," for there's 

Some "due" upon them yet. 



"Go to father," I said, 

When he asked me to wed, 
For I knew that he knew 

That my father was dead. 
And I knew that he knew 

What a life he had led, 
So I knew that he knew 

What I meant when I said, 

"Go to father!" 



We all of us love St. Mary's, 

We think she beats them all; 
We love every spot and corner 

From the Eectory to Senior Hall. 

As for the grand old teachers, 

Their equal can't be found; 
In fact, it's just the best old place 

Anywhere around. E. T. W. 



Athletics for Girls. 

Athletics for girls is a mighty good thing: of that no one needs to be told. 
There're laurels, and ribbons, and medals galore; fine prizes of silver and gold, 
Awaiting the maid in the champion class who'll enter the sports of the field, 
And when she appears on Life's Stadium she will find even better revealed. 
The seven-mile-walk, for example, is fine, for surely a maiden should learn 
The art of preserving her powers until she comes to the very last term ; 
And when it comes down to real talent in this the girl who will certainly score 
Is she who hands in the best record at night in pacing the nursery floor. 
The hundred-yard dash is another good thing for those who are fleet as the deer, 
And maybe the maiden who wins it to-day will find it of value next year 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



When running at eve from her pretty boudoir to meet Mr. Man at the gate — 
The one who makes records with dashes like that will never be quite out of date. 
In throwing the hammer let all of them show the best that is in them to do. 
You never can tell when a talent like this will prove of real value to you. 
It may not be useful at five-o'clock teas, in writing a poem or book, 
But none can deny it will help on the cause in bouncing a riotous cook. 
The running broad jump is an excellent school for girls who are timid with mice. 
It saves them from leaping on tables and chairs, which candidly isn't quite nice. 
And if you are dreaming, the pole vault's the thing. I know of naught to compare; 
It teaches you how to alight with real grace when coming down out of the air. 
And finally, girls, in athletic pursuits, of foot-ball be students, I pray. 
No matter how rough or how hard be 'the game, keep at it by night and by day. 
You'll find in the future its training will help to bring you out surely on top, 
When Bargain Day comes and you start through the rush and roar of your sisters to 
shop. J- K. Bangs. 



With the "Kidlets. " 



(Being extracts from the "West Rock Dormitory Weekly" — a "newspaper of com- 
ment edited for the amusement of the said dormitory.") 

Jan, Jfth: During the first day after our return from spending the 
Christmas holidays at home, there was much weeping, wailing, and 
gnashing of teeth, but at the time of writing homesickness seems to have 
taken wings and jollity reigns supreme. 

Misses C F , C P , and B R , have seem- 
ingly defied the school laws and remained at home longer than the law- 
ful vacation. Fearful consequences will doubtless be the outcome of 
this offense. As these young ladies are already domiciled in a dormi- 
tory and it will probably be impossible on that account to deprive them 
of their rooms, they may perhaps be shorn of their hair and condemned 
to stripes and hand-cuffs. 

One of the most brilliant social events in the history of the Dormitory 
was the german given on Saturday afternoon by M. L. E. . . . . . The 

dance was held in the hall of the dormitory, a very elegant and suitable 
place for such a festivity. The music was furnished by the steam-heat 
band, and was something quite new and remarkable in its strangely 
hissing strains. Every one present pronounced the occasion glorious 
and the Dormitory event of the season. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 15 



Jan, 11th: Every morning just as the seven-thirty bell rings, sleepy 
voices come from the alcoves of Misses L. J ...... and M. E ... . "M 

. . . . , are you ready ?" "No, L , are you ?" "Not quite, but I'm 

going to try to get to breakfast on time." Then from Miss K. E . . . . 's 

alcove : "I don't believe that was a half -hour." "Neither do I, K ," 

from M. E Then Miss Katie, with meek voice, chimes in and says, 

"Yes it has, it has been over that time." And in conclusion Miss B. 

R says in drowsy tone, "Has the bell rung?" 

Jan 18th: We were all delightfully surprised Thursday night when 
Miss Katie asked us down stairs to the "Grill Koom" to partake of her 
birthday box. She more than deserved the vote of thanks that was 
unanimously extended. .......... 

Dearly beloved, Sunday is General Lee's birthday. Miss Katie duly 
impressed us with the fact. 

Jan. 25th: "Christmas comes but once a year," but it came twice 
this year seemingly, probably because it is leap year. Misses S. . . . 

and G. F . . . . shot fireworks until they saw stars. We all hope that 

they will soon recover from the effects of breaking Miss Katie's Golden 
Kule. 

Dear friends, come and sympathize with our little Wilhemina ; she 
is homesick, we fear, for she is very blue, despondent and unhappy. 

Please all be kind to her, and we appoint Miss N a committee of 

one to make up her bed for her each morning, and Miss M. E. . . . to 
learn her Sunday School lesson for her on Sundays. 

We were delightfully entertained Saturday by a serenade, a la A. and 
M., by Miss L. J. Judging from the music the comb had several teeth 
broken. The musician must come again and cheer up the poor damsels 
again before Easter. 

Advertisement: Any one wishing her bed made up had better do it 
herself, as "mashes" are very forgetful. 

Weather Report: Breeze from the oak trees near West Dormitory 
predicted for next Saturday. A heavy fall of snow from the northern 
part of the Dormitory Monday or Tuesday night. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M T I>ak, Durham. 
Vice-Presidents, \ *j™. I *J. HiMenger, Raleigh, 
' I Mrs. H. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
[Mrs.Kaie de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



Let the Alumnae everywhere bear in mind the twelfth of May, which 
falls on Tuesday this year, and make preparation to have full and 
enthusiastic meetings on that day in every locality in which they are 
organized or can organize. 

A successful celebration of Alumnae Day this year, including the 
appointment of delegates to the Commencement meeting of the Alumnae, 
would go far toward promoting alumnae interests. 

The long-deferred Alumnoe Muse will be published within the next 
month and will be placed in the hands of all of the Alumnae who may 
be interested. With its accounts of the Founders' Day meetings, show- 
ing what was accomplished last fall, and the several Alumnae contribu- 
tions, giving further glimpses into the school life in the past, the issue 
will doubtless prove of interest to many. 



The Whereabouts of Old Teachers. 



The teachers who from time to time have come to St. Mary's, finished 
their work here, and passed on to other fields, are now scattered far and 
wide, even those of very recent years, but most of them retain the kind- 
liest impressions of the place and life here and most of them in one way 
or another keep in touch with the School and allow their friends to know 
more or less of them. "Miss Katie" has seen them all come and go, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 

and not one of them but looks back and thinks of her with admiration, 
and through her more than in any other one way is The Muse kept 
acquainted with news of them. 

Mr. DuBose and Mrs. DuBose write very happily of the life in their 
new home in Morganton, where Mr. DuBose has entirely recovered his 
old health and is doing energetic work in that excellent mission field, 
where he has his seven mission stations in the outlying country, besides 
the parish church at Morganton and eight parochial mission schools. 
Miss Margaret is with her parents this winter — her continued willing- 
ness to be the good friend to The Muse that she has always been is evi- 
denced by her contribution to this number — and the family remains 
intact as it was at St. Mary's except that McNeely, Jr., is now a Fresh- 
man at South Carolina University. 

Of Bishop Bratton we have little direct news, and we presume that 
means that his busy life continues, while we know that however few the 
written words, his thoughts many times fly in this direction and he is 
as much interested in the work here as heretofore. Thoughts of him 
are ever linked with thoughts of active work for an endowment, for he 
spoke the first public word in its behalf shortly after the lifting of the 
purchase debt, in his words to the Alumna3 at the 1906 Commencement. 
"Aunt Angie (Collins)," with whom most of those who know the old 
faithful kitchen retainers of the School are acquainted, has lately re- 
turned to Raleigh from Mississippi, where she had been for some 
months at Bishop Bratton's in attendance on Mrs. Randolph, and she 
reports that all the family are well, and Dr. Bratton, while not at 
home much, is looking well. 

It has been a satisfaction at this session to see a start made in the 
plan of having the faces of the ladies who have at different periods in 
the past presided in the School look down from the walls of the Teach- 
ers' Sitting Room in East Rock on those who now carry on the work. 
Good photographs of Mrs. Iredell, of Miss Czarnomska, Miss Battle, 
Mrs. Bratton and Mrs. DuBose are now hanging in the room, and it is 
hoped to add those of Mrs. Meares and Miss McVea at an early date. 
Mrs. Iredell continues in about her usual health and has been all this 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



session at her home in Raleigh. A loving care for the protection and 
advancement of the interests and ideas of St. Mary's will always be as 
it has always been a leading motive in her daily life, and she finds many 
ways in which to help the School in the city and among the Alumnae. ; 
Mrs. Meares, while still making Wilmington her permanent home, has 
been spending this winter chiefly in Asheville. There is rarely a time 
when she is not remembered at St. Mary's by a namesake among the 
girls, and this year is no exception, for her great-niece, Katharine 
DeRosset Parker, of Plainfield, K J., is one of the present year girls. 
Miss Czarnomska continues her work as Dean of Women at the Uni- 
versity of Cinicinnati, and Miss McVea is still Assistant Professor of 
English in the same University, from which she is energetically direct- 
ing the campaign for the Scholarship Fund. 

Miss Pool, after resting through the fall, has been induced to take 
up her work again in the Raleigh Schools, and is on duty at the Wiley 
School. She is up frequently on Reception Days (Wednesdays) to see ! 
her friends and note what is going on at St. Mary's. The Sorority life 
still shows as plainly as in the year she left the absence of Miss Check- 
ley, who is continuing her excellent work as Principal of The Cathedral 
School in Havana. The school grows year by year and is a great bless- 
ing in Bishop Knight's Cuban field. Miss Checkley was on in the 
summer and was able to pay a brief visit to St. Mary's and note the 
changes, and the Chapters of the Auxiliary have pleasure in being able 
to help a little in her work. Very gratifying indeed to her friends is 
the success of the first year of Miss Kate Shipp's new school — "Fassi- 
fern" — a t Lincolnton. Located there in the comfortable new building 
Miss Shipp has had all the pupils she could accommodate, and assisted 
by Mrs. McBee and Miss Josephine Bowen, has been able this year to 
lay a very successful foundation for even greater success in years to 
come. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeudwine's interest in St. Mary's is constant, and they 
keep posted on affairs here through The Muse and Miss Dowd. They 
are still living in Somerset, England, with no idea of returning to 
this country. Mr. Jeudwine's health is good, but he has to be careful 
not to overwork. Mr. and Mrs. Sanborn continue to devote their atten- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 

tion to the Music Department of Southern Seminary, in their home 
town, Buena Vista, Va., where Mr. Sanborn is Director of the Depart- 
ment and Mrs. Sanborn head voice teacher,— the same places they 
filled so acceptably before their last return to St. Mary's. Mrs. Harri- 
son-Irvine is this year Director of Music at St. Mary's Hall, Burling- 
ton, N. J., where she has made a very pleasant impression. Miss Hull 
and Miss Pixley are enthusiastic over their European studies, and 
their many friends hope that nothing will interfere with their return to 
St. Mary's next year. Miss Hull, who, with her mother, is spending 
the year in Prague, Austria, is studying with Sevcik, and Miss Pixley 
is a pupil of Burmeister in Berlin. Miss Pixley went over to Prague 
to spend the holidays with Miss Hull, to their mutual delight. 

Most of the other teachers who keep St. Mary's posted of their work 
and welfare have made few changes this session. Miss Florence Slater 
continues her connection with the New York City Schools, where she 
has been for several years chief assistant in Biology in the Flushing 
High School. Her health this winter has not been satisfactory, and 
she^is at present on a visit to her sister, Mrs. William Carter, in Wins- 
ton, on two months leave of absence. Miss Alice Edwards Jones con- 
tinues as head of the Latin Department in Winthrop College, S. C, 
where Miss Schutt has been teaching in the Music Department ever 
since she left St. Mary's, as have "Sadie Jenkins, '05," and "Susie 
Battle" for the past three years. Miss Mabel Hale holds the important 
place among the teachers of The Baldwin School at Bryn Mawr, Pa., 
that she left Kenosha two years ago to fill. Miss Margaret Jones^ is 
spending another winter in New York City, tutoring and substituting 
in Mathematics in different city high schools. Miss Imogen Stone was 
last year at Teachers' College, Columbia University, for a year's study, 
but has this session returned to her teaching at Newcomb College, Tu- 
lane University. Mile. Gerber, who left us four years ago after de- 
ciding to retire from teaching and resigning from Miss Knox's School 
at Briar Cliff Manor, K". Y., was tempted out to Kentucky and is hav- 
ing a very pleasant experience there in Miss Ella Williams's School at 
Lexington. 

Miss Christine Busbee, after two years as Instructor in German at 
Mt. Holyoke College, has this year returned to Cornell University, 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 

where she is continuing her study for the Master's Degree. Miss Jen 
nie Trapier gave up this year her work at Fairmont, Monteagle, Tenn. 
and is spending the winter with her parents in Raleigh. Miss Kati 
Meares is teaching again in the Bennettsville (S. C.) High School 
Miss Eliza Brown is married; Miss Balfour and Miss Laxton hav< 
slipped away from our knowledge. 

With hearty appreciation of the good work each one has done an( 
best wishes in the present and future work of each, The Muse extendi 
greeting. 



Beautiful Things. 

(The following verses were a favorite of Madame Clement during the early dayy 
of St. Mary's when she was in charge of the French classes, and they were re-printec. 
and distributed among St. Mary's girls of the present, through the courtesy of Mrs' 
Iredell, three years ago at the time of the establishing of the Madame Clemeni: 
Scholarship by her daughter in her honor. Their publication here will doubtless 
awaken a pleasant memory for some who knew Madame and Miss Clement, and it iii{ 
in hope of this that they are here published.) 

Beautiful faces are those that wear, 
It matters little if dark or fair, 
Whole-souled honesty written there. 

Beautiful eyes are those that show 

Like crystal panes where hearth-fires glow 

Beautiful thoughts that burn below. 

Beautiful lips are those whose words 
Spring from the heart, like songs of birds, 
Yet whose utterance prudence girds. 

Beautiful hands are those that do 

Work that is earnest and brave and true, 

Moment by moment, the long day through. 

Beautiful feet are those that go 
On kindly ministries to and fro 
Down the lowliest ways if God wills so. 

Beautiful shoulders are those that bear 
Ceaseless burdens of homely care 
With patient grace and daily prayer. 



Tiie St. Maky's Muse. 21 



Beautiful lives are those that bless, 

Silent rivers of happiness 

Whose hidden fountains few may guess. 

Beautiful twilight, at set of sun, 
Beautiful goal, with race well run, 
Beautiful Best — with work well done. 

Beautiful graves, where grasses creep, 
Where brown leaves fall, where drifts lie deep, 
Over worn-out hands, Beautiful Sleep! 

— Anonymous. 



A Hollins Tribute to Mr. Mack- 
Albert Augustus Mack, associate professor of piano and theory of 
ausic in the College of Fine Arts of Syracuse University, died on Jan- 
iary 5th at the Hospital of the Good Shepherd in Syracuse, !N T ew York. 
^ September he underwent an operation for the fatal disease which has 
)een creeping on him for years, but from the first almost no hope of his 
•ecovery was entertained. For weeks he lingered painfully between life 
md death, animated only by a spirit that would not die. 

Professor Mack had been connected with Syracuse University for 
raly three years, yet in that short time his personality as a teacher, his 
)ri°inality as a composer, and his art as a musician had made for him a 
secure and honorable place in the music circles of the city and the Uni- 
versity. But death cut short his career in the fulness of manhood, and 
in the youth of his development as a composer. The University gave 
aim up with mourning. Wrapped in his Doctor's robe, the musician 
was laid in the chapel of Grouse College, and Chancellor Day, assisted 
by Professor Mack's rector, conducted the funeral services with full Uni- 
versity honors. His body was interred at Groton, Connecticut, where 
bis nearest relatives and connections live. 

Prof. Albert A. Mack was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., fifty-four years 
ago. He received almost his entire education in Germany, and it is 
well to recall that this education was one of uncommon symmetry, 
breadth and finish. Although his musical gift outshone his other gifts, 
his was a nature of bright endowments, many of which were brought to 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



a high state of perfection. After years of European study and expe- 
rience, Professor Mack returned to America, with the degree from Stutt- 
gart Conservatory, to begin his work of teacher and writer of musiq 
Step by step, softly but unwaveringly, he followed to the end his life'd 
fixed purpose — to teach people to appreciate and perform good music, 
and to write music worthy to be appreciated. 

Though his work as a teacher was noble and inspiring, it is his songs 
that give the assurance that he will not be forgotten in the music circles 
of America and of Europe, for he has won more than a home recogni- 
tion. He has a high place among the song writers of America, being 
one of the most artistic composers of songs in his generation — a genera- 
tion to which MacDowell and Eoote belong. As has already been sug- 
gested, though dying at fifty-four years of age, he was still a young com- 
poser. His high ideal of the melody, construction, and artistic finish 
of song music set him a long apprenticeship in the technic of his art, so 
that he was just coining, as it were, into the kingdom of his genius. 
The gift was allowed to him 

"That out of three sounds he frame, not a fourth sound, but a star," 

and with this gift he had the master's passion for the perfect form in 
art. So he worked a long time, often years, on a composition before 
sending it to the publisher. Thus it is, that the list of his compositions 
is not long, but every one of them bears a highly individual mark and 
an artistic elegance that makes it a gem of music. If the sixteen more 
years of the allotted three score and ten had been granted him, his con- 
tribution to the music of America, without doubt, would have been dis- 
proportionately greater. 

God set the lamp of a beautiful gift in his soul, but, under Provi- 
dence, out of elements from within and without himself, the musician 
built up a strong and lovely character. And the power of character 
transcends even the power of genius. Happy for the work of a man 
and for his associates it is, when character and genius go hand in hand, 
giving and receiving mutual inspiration. Of the marriage of these two 
great forces in human life Mr. Mack is an Example. Somehow, some- 
where in the silent, inscrutable years of childhood and uneventful youth, 
tiny streams of influence were flowing in to swell the deep current, of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



his character until, when I knew him in middle life, it was like some 
great ocean-going river, giving back the image only of whatsoever things 
are honest, pure, jnst, and high. No one who ever knew Professor 
Mack can forget his sympathy, his gentle, quizzical humor— redeeming 
the dullness of the commonplace in which we all have, alas, too often to 
walk— his unassuming dignity, and modest way of putting the right 
word in the right place. He showed the heart, the mind, the character 
of a true polished gentleman in all of his speech and acts, doing always 
-the most generous thing in the most gracious way. It seems to me that 
he added to his high accomplishments in art, the beauty of a noble life. 
Admired, appreciated, honored as Professor Mack was elsewhere, he 
was beloved at Hollins, where he held a professorship in piano, organ, 
and the theory of music, from September, 1900, to June, 1905. Dur- 
ing these years his power as a teacher, his genius as a writer of music, 
and his high attainments as a Christian gentleman were an ornament 
to the institution he served. At every turn his generous, artistic nature 
drew friends around him, and these friends now mourn his loss with 
those who sorrow most— M. W., in the Hollins Quarterly for February. 



Alumnae Notes. 



The Hector had a very pleasant visit in Wilmington from Saturday, 
February 8th, to the following Tuesday. Besides meeting a number of 
his kinsfolk and friends connected with his former home in Easton, Md., 
and with St. Paul's School, Concord, K H., he also met with great 
pleasure a number of the Alumna of St. Mary's at their homes and at 
a meeting on Monday afternoon. He also had the privilege of report- 
ing on the School at the morning service at St. James Church and of 
preaching on that occasion and at the Chapel of the Good Shepherd in 
the evening. There is a large number of loyal Alumnae in Wilming- 
ton, and in spite of the bad weather and the prevalence of the grippe 
there was a goodly assemblage of enthusiastic "old girls" at the meeting 
on Monday afternoon, where they spent over two hours with the Eector 
in talking over the past associations and future prospects of the School. 
On his way to Wilmington the Rector stopped over for several hours 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



in Goldsboro, and also spent a delightful day there on his return as the 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Borden. During this time he had the 
pleasure of meeting a number of the Alumnse and other friends of the 
School. The Rector was especially interested in visiting Goldsboro, 
since it was named after Matthew Tilghman Goldsborough, the engineer 
of one of the early North Carolina railroads, who was one of the large 
and well-known Goldsborough family of Maryland, with many of whose 
members he has been intimate most of his life. 

Her many friends will be glad to have a word from "Bettie Windley," 
who writes from Baltimore in a recent letter to Miss Fenner: "What 
do you think I am doing ? Just what I have dreamed of and hoped for 
for years, — going to the Woman's College. It is perfectly delightful. 
I enjoy every minute of my work, and that is saying that I am enjoying 
many minutes, for I am doing a lot of work. This year I am special- 
izing in English and have three courses, besides a few other things, but 
next year I shall go in for the regular course. Mother is delighted with 
Baltimore too, and then we have Elise Walker from Brevard with us. 
She is studying in a private school here, and next winter expects to go 
to a Library School." 

Miss Fenner is busily planning another trip to Europe for this sum- 
mer, this year, however, for travel only and not for study. She is 
planning the trip in connection with Miss Pattie Carroll, of Raleigh. 
They will have not more than ten in the party. Miss Thomas and 
"Emily Carrison" expect to be two of the party. St. Mary's girls will 
also form parts of several other European parties, notably those of Miss 
Elizabeth Cheshire, which sails in March, and that of Miss Kate Shipp, 
which starts in June. 



The following clipping from The Charleston Post, while somewhat 
delayed in publication, will doubtless prove interesting to the school- 
friends of the young ladies of the last three years: 

The delightful luncheon at which Miss Irving Morgan entertained Thursday in 
honor of her house guest, Miss Mary Lily Fisher, of Edgefield, was most appropri- 
ately called a St. Mary's luncheon, the charming young hostess and her guests all 
having been students together at St. Mary's College in Raleigh. Carrying out the 
school idea in every detail, the colors used in the decorations were white and blue, the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

college colors, the flowers being white chrysanthemums; the dainty place cards 
painted by Miss Morgan were college pennants in blue and white. A most delightful 
time was spent by the eight young ladies during the morning talking over school 
days, and even a college yell was given occasionally, in memoriam. The pleasure of 
talking of the past was equalled by that in anticipating the future, and the parting 
was with regret, though they were soon to meet again. Miss Morgan's guests were: 
Misses Fisher, Fannie Lee, Hazel Middleton, Nathalie Dotterer, Lillian Hughes, May 
Kinloeh and Elizabeth Bryan. 

And not less interesting is the following article from The Tuscaloosa 
News of February 4th. "Jennie Morris" was with us in 1905-06, and 
has this year been attending the University of Alabama: 

HOWARD-MORRIS. 

An Interesting Marriage Yesterday Afternoon. Young People Take Both 
Friends and Relatives by Surprise. 

Yesterday afternoon at the Baptist pastorium, Miss Jennie V. Morris, of this city, 
was married to Mr. Claud M. Howard, of Fort Payne, Alabama. When the news of 
this interesting event was learned it created great surprise among the many friends 
of Miss Morris here, as she had told no one of her arrangements, and the young couple 
left the city before the news was out. 

Th bride, who lived with her father, Mr. Chas. Morris, on the corner of Sixth street 
and Twenty-fifth Avenue, is one of the prettiest and most popular members of the 
younger social set of the city. Since she moved here with her parents a number of 
years ago, when she was quite a little girl, she has been a favorite with a large number 
of friends, and at this time, having just arrived at young ladyhood, in addition to 
being admired for her beauty and attractiveness, she impressed all who knew her 
with her sweet and gentle disposition. Miss Morris will be much missed in the society 
of the young people, and such an attractive young lady is yielded by Tuscaloosa with 
much regret. 

The groom, Mr. Howard, is a prominent young man of Fort jfayne, and a son of 
ex-Congressman M. W. Howard, who is well known over the State. The heartiest of 
wishes* for a long and happy life is extended the young couple on this auspicious 
occasion. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



& TYREE 

TO MAKE YOTTE 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



We may live without poetry, music and art ; 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart; 
We may live without friends, we may live without fads, 
But The Muse to he sure can not live without ADS ! 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AMD SLIPPERS 



THEBOYLAN-PEARCECO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mall orders filled intelligently and promptly 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY ST*. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



frHE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Safety, Courtesy and Accommodation to 
Patrons. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 

W.N.Jones Vice-President. 

P. H. Bkiggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fireand Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place lor keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 



GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. 0. 



The Citizens National Bank 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



* 100,000.00 

100.000.00 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Beown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for t he prom pt and proper 
execution of fine church work suehas Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



"Acts" of courteous men remind ns 
We can shop with them some more, 

And, departing, leave behind us 
All our pennies in the store. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteviile St., Raleigb, N. C. 


HARDENS LIVERY 
Always Ready. 


" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 


ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 






D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 
Fancy Groceries, 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 






Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteviile Street. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 


127 Fayetteviile Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 
guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 


W. C. STMACH'S SONS CO. 

| GROCERS I 


Air Heaters, tbe only perfect heater 
made. Write for prices. 


216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 


KING'S GROCERY, 


KTNG-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


"The Little Store." 





BKOKE AGAIN. 

lSTow comes, I wis, 
The time of bliss 
For which each miss 

Doth pine, 
And Tom or Hal 
Spends half his "sal" 
To buy a val- 

Entine. 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

Gr R O C E R S 

WILMINGTON <fc HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 



FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBACH LIQHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

3n application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, (Jlass Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 



WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHOBN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 



JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



An optimist and pessimist — 
The difference is droll. 

The optimist sees the doughnut, 
The pessimist sees the hole. 



A newly-captured horse-thief, 

Dangling from a tree, 
In a hoarse whisper murmured, 

"This suspense is killing me." 



HINES BROS, LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N. C. 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber, 



Good things always at „.„„„,. 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 2t6 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists op North Carolina. 
Ralei gh, N. C. 

H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Ralei gh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly ana 
safely Headache in all its form*. 



ROBT SIMPSON, 



Advertisements. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitter*. 


ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


121 Fayetteville Street. 


/jfl^DWARDSWk 
(£& BROUGHTOW*) 
ff/PRLNTLNG COAll 


J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET, 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C 


W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett Si, Raleigh, N. C. 


Dk. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 






H. T. HICKS CO. 
Foa Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 


PESCUTTS PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



Man is like unto a kerosene lamp : 

He isn't especially bright ; 
He's often turned down, usually smokes, 

And frequently goes out at night. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 


BARRETT & THOMPSON, 


Fkancis p. Venablf, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


Architects and Engineers, 

raleigh, n. c. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANKY, general Agent, 


ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRB. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Fres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital SI 5,000 Surplus $50,000. Deposits over 
$750,000. Four percent interest- paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. a 



School Calendar, !907-'08. 



FEBRUARY-MARCH, 1908. 



February 3d, Monday: 8 p. m. Recital. Baptist University Auditorium. Mr. 

Walter Spry, Pianist. 
February 13th, Thursday: 3 p. m. Lecture. "The Development of the Oratorio." 

Raney Hall. Mr. Wade R. Brown. 
February 22d, Saturday. Half-holiday. Washington's Birthday Exercises. Joint 

auspices of the Literary Societies. 12 noon. 
February 27th, Thursday. 7 : 30 p. m. Pupils' Recital. 

February 29th, Saturday. 8 p. m. Mr. A. F. Bowen in a "Programme Magique." 
March 4th, Wednesday. Ash Wednesday. Holy Day. Lent begins. 



Order of Services at St. Mary's Chapel. 



Holy Communion each Sunday throughout the School Session. 

First and third Sundays at 11 a. m. 

Other Sundays at 7:50 a. m. 
Holy Communion on Saints' Days and on Ash Wednesday, the Feast of the Annun- 
ciation (March 25th), each day in Holy Week except Good Friday, and on 

Monday and Tuesday in Easter Week at 7 a. m. 

LENT, 1908. 

Shortened Morning Prayer: Mondays at 8:05; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays 

at 9 a. m. 
Litany: Wednesdays and Fridays at 9 a. m. 

Shortened Evening Prayer (Voluntary to the School), with brief address Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays at 5:30 p. m. 
(Prayers in the School Room on these days at 6:35 p. m.) 
Shortened Evening Prayer: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:35 p. m* 



&. 



ART'S School 



RALEIGH, N 



{for rjirls and young .women). 



65m ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER'-, 19, 1907. 



EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1908. 



Mary's 



letimi /in these 
"i tnenttt MBiffitlH 



1 L THE COLLEGE. 
& BBBB $C$OOp. BBS 
^c'jlH^'iff psi^^ss; SCHOOL. 

I i\ THE AR1 SCHOOL 
6. 1HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 



ed, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Tiveniy-e/ght 

ittetttion to the Social and Christian sate of Educed ion without alight 

stic tiyiinittg. WEBB^sS^m^'^lM'M -YNv*;^*^£?v 

^f^^lN^S^^ - < t?'" s 4.-' /•!>--" '*i' '^^i.^i-s 'M 

Rev. George W. Lay, 



fl&arcb, 1908 



St, flfoary's Abuse 




Xent number 



IRaleiab, «. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



LENT NUMBER. 



Vol. XII. March, 1908. No. 6 



Inland- 



inland fog! driving rain! 

heart borne down with longing pain! 

The endless fields stretch on afar, 
Black night creeps in without one star, 
And the wailing wind in the sodden trees 
Pierces my soul with its memories. 

1 hear the surf's deep thunder-roar, 
Where the ocean beats on a distant shore — 
I taste the brine of the wild white spray — 
The sea-coast calls — I must away! 

For its voice calls over the land to me, 
To rest once more bv the restless sea. 



M. 



The Lilac Gown. 



MINNIE TEMPLET HAZARD, '10. 



It was almost dusk. In the little, low-roofed cottage, close beside the 
window and endeavoring to catch the fast fading light, sat a woman on 
whose knees lay, in strange contrast to its surroundings, a mass of lace 
and lilac silk. With this her hands were busy. 

"Ah ! it is getting dark." 

The tone, low and anxious, had in it a note of despair. A moment 
later the woman rose to place beside her a candle whose tiny beams 
lighted but dimly the small chamber. However, the heavy eyes strained 
and the tired hands worked on. Deftly she handled the dainty mate- 
rial, touching it gently, yet tremulously, in her haste. 

A child's cry broke the stillness of the room, and at the sound the 
woman raised a face death-like in its paleness, but on which was the 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



light of a great and tender love. As again her head bent over the lilac 
mass, one might have traced at that moment an expression of bitterness 
on the features. There was a second wail, full of childish pain. The 
mother rose and, going to a bed in the corner, took in her arms a; 

little boy. 

A dampened mass of golden ringlets lay on the small, flushed brow ; 
the brown eyes sparkled with an unnatural brightness; the baby lips,, 
parched and dry with fever, parted again in a plaintive cry; and one* 
small hand, seeking the mother's face, fell limply on her breast. 

"Muwer, muwer," came in childish accents. 

"My baby," was the answer, as the woman pressed still closer to herj 
bosom the little, quivering form. 

But continued wailing proved that even the mother's arms could not' 
quiet the little sufferer ; and the woman returned to her work, hoping 
thus to procure the means of providing for her baby. There by the 
window she sat ; and, though her eyes grew moist and her bosom heaved 
with stifled sobs, she ceased not until the gown in all its graceful folds 
lay finished. 

On that selfsame night, two hours later, the Lady Nora, with the 
assistance of numerous maids, was donning her evening gown. 

"Dear me, madam, a stain! A water stain at that! But one might: 
expect as much ! And then, when you gave her the work as a favor, she 
must needs at this busy moment ask for instant payment ! I consider- 
it highly impertinent, Your ladyship did right to give the lessom 
in patience." 

And, in a voice cold and haughty, the Lady Nora, though apprised! 
of the reason for the importunate request, answered her maid in the 
affirmative. 

There came the sound of voices from the hall below. The final 
touches were given to the coils of dark hair ; the necklace of pearls was 
clasped about the white throat; the one tear-stain was carefully con- 
cealed ; and the lady left her apartments. 

The portieres of the brilliantly lighted hall parted, and there entered 
with a queenly step the Lady Nora, bearing in the lace folds at heT 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



bosom the hidden memorial of a mother's pain. A slight hush greeted 
the lady's entrance, for famed was she for her dark beauty and proud 
bearing. 

Jewels flashed in the rays of myriad lights. Merry laughter and 
voices full of joyous pleasure rang through the spacious apartment, and 
the hours passed amidst mirth. Through the gorgeous throng there 
moved the tall, dark figure gowned in lilac and lace. Not one among 
that gay assemblage thought for a moment that the diamonds in the 
Lady Nora's dark braids were far surpassed in beauty by the hidden 
jewel which she wore; none, if they noticed that once a shadow passed 
over the face of the Lady Nora and that she clutched at the lace folds on 
her bosom, knew that it was but the memory of a mother's grief ; none 
there knew that at that selfsame moment a little sufferer was forever 
released from pain. 



A Dream. 



SERENA COBIA BAILEY. 



Last night I dreamed in a dream most fair 
That yon stately beau in brocade and lace, 

With the mystic eyes and the powdered hair, 

Stepped down from his canvas and danced with me. 

And his mien was grave, but his eyes beguiled, 
And he danced (as he loved) with a grace so rare 

That my eyes and my heart, despite me, smiled 
At the gallant beau in brocade and lace. 

Yet I blushed at his tender glance on me, 
For at last I could read his inmost heart 

As he oped it wide to have me see — 

My charming beau in brocade and lace. 

Love, love, was the message written there; 

And I knew we had loved in some olden days, 
For 'twas I — 'twas I that he held so dear! 

This gallant beau in brocade and lace. 

But to-day, alas, is my short dream gone; 

Still I gaze for e'er at the mystic eyes, 
As I sit, soul-chilled, alone, forlorn, 

With a pictured beau in brocade and lace. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



he Game. 



NELL E. WILSON 



It was the day before the great game. In a parlor on Fifth Avenue 
a man stood facing a girl, he pale and determined, she flushed and 
excited. "Well, Marion, what is your answer? Won't you tell me 
now?" She looked up demurely, hesitating a moment, her one idea 
being to find some way to postpone the final decision, for as yet she did 
not know her own mind. "Well," slowly, and then with a sudden 
flash of humor in her clear, grey eyes, she said, "We will let the game | 

to-morrow decide. If Princeton wins, then ! !" He looked at her 

eagerly, to be sure that she was in earnest, then taking her hand 
touched it to his lips and was gone, leaving her bewildered and a little 

remorseful. 

She threw herself into an easy chair and, burying her face in her 
hands, sat quietly trying to collect her thoughts. What she had done 
was done thoughtlessly and on the impulse of the moment, and only 
now did she begin to realize how seriously it had ended. Bob Win- 
throp's earnest look as he bade her good-bye made her realize that. 

Marion's troubles did not end here, however. For many weeks she 
had been considering very seriously the various attractions and possi- 
bilities of two men, both her ardent suitors — the one Bob Winlhrop, a 
senior at Princeton, and the other a Yale senior, Joe Nesbit, the cap- 
tain of the football team. Now Bob was right guard on the Princeton 
team and to-morrow they would be matched against each other for the 
last time in the great game of the season. This had suddenly flashed 
into her mind while talking with Bob, and being still so uncertain 
which one she preferred, it had occurred to her as an easy way to 
decide. But she had never meant to let them into the secret. As she 
sat, thinkiug of all these things with a puzzled little frown on her fore- 
head, she heard the door open and, turning quickly, was face to face 
with the big Yale captain. 

"Well," he cried, buoyantly, "I have only a few minutes, Marion. 
Sit down and let me talk seriously with you." 

"Seriously, Joe? Do you want to talk seriously? How strange!" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Yes, Marion, I have come for my answer. I felt that I couldn't go 
into the game to-morrow until I knew my fate with you. What is it 

t0 De 'Yes' or 'No'?" He was eager, impatient, but she sat silent 

before him and once more hesitated. She had bound herself to one 
man in case of victory , so why not make the same conditions with this 
other. Lifting her eyes suddenly to his face, she said, softly, "Joe, if 
you win to-morrow it shall be as you wish !" 

He leaped to his feet and, seizing her hand, cried, "Then you are 
mine already, Marion! Will you wish me success?" 

"jSTo yes — Oh please let us say nothing more about it," she answered 

wearily, for suddenly the whole embarrassing situation overwhelmed 
her and she longed to be alone. 



The day was bright and cold. The little town was thronged with 
merry crowds in gay colors, all hurrying in one direction and stream- 
ing through the gates to the athletic field. For hours they hurried by, 
and at last the grand-stands were full and a hush of expectancy fell 
upon the great throng. Then cheer after cheer broke from the Yale 
side and the mass of people were hidden beneath the thousands of blue 
flags that waved a welcome to the little group of men who were trotting 
leisurely out into the field. Immediately it was answered from the 
Princeton stands by a roar, even louder and more prolonged, while the 
whole side blossomed into colors as the orange flags were waved aloft 
and the Princeton team came quickly across the gridiron. 

The game began, amid a silence that was thrilling in its very inten- 
sity. Back and forth the two teams struggled, often nearing one goal, 
only to be thrown back upon the other. And as each side gained or lost 
the crowds leaped with one accord to their feet or sank back breath- 
lessly with solemn faces. The excitement was intense. Men and 
women, swayed by a common emotion, watched with such eager and 
burning interest that a disinterested watcher, had there been any there, 
might have thought that on the issue of this game depended life or death. 

And such was almost the case with Marion Kandall, or so she felt, 
as she sat scarcely breathing, watching with brilliant eyes and a beating 
heart the progress of the game. Oh, how she regretted her foolishness 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



of the day before ! How could she have let this game decide a matter 
which touched her whole future happiness ! How she despised herself 
for her weak-mindedness ! But it was done now and all she could do 
was to watch and hope — yes hope with all her heart, for now at last 
she knew which one she really wanted, now when it was too late ! She 
had promised and she could not break that promise! Down on the 
field two men had forgotten all else but their one burning desire and 
resolve — to win, whatever might happen. But there was a difference 
in their thoughts. Winthrop, through his fierce determination, knew 
that, even to win Marion he must not resort to unfair means, but must 
fight fairly and squarely to the end. The Yale captain, however, re- 
peated over and over in his heart, as he put his whole strength of mind 
and body into the conflict, "I must win at any cost and make way with 
every obstacle. It means Marion and happiness for the rest of my life." 

And so, realizing that the one thing that matched his own strength 
and cunning was the unerring force and judgment of the man who was 
facing and who inevitably defeated his every movement and detected 
his cleverest plan, he set himself to remove this obstacle by foul means 
or fair. Once, when pinned beneath a mass of struggling players, Win- 
throp felt the weight of a heavy knee pressing against his ribs, and 
glancing quickly up met ISTesbit's sullen eyes and, in a sudden flash of 
understanding, realized his intention. He almost laughed aloud at 
this revelation of the man's real character and was filled with new 
strength at the thought of not only winning the girl for himself but of 
saving her from Nesbit. 

A few moments later the Princeton stands arose with a great roar of 
delight as a figure suddenly detached itself from the crowd of players 
and sped with wonderful swiftness and agility through the few inter- 
vening opponents and down, down the field till it reached the goal. 
Now it was no longer a crowd of excited spectators, but a frenzied mob 
that leaped and shouted, flinging hats and flags into the air, and shriek- 
ing Winthrop's name over and over in a very madness of delight. 

The goal was kicked — it was six to nothing — and once more the 
crowds settled down to breathless watching. But now the Yale captain 
seemed suddenly filled with wild audacity. He was everywhere at 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



>nce fighting with all his strength, and Winthrop again and again caught 
he gleam of anger in his eyes. And then, without warning, when 
>nce more crowded together in a pushing, struggling mass, "Winthrop 
felt the spiked heel of a heavy foot ground again and again upon his 
knee until the hone suddenly broke, sending sharp pain through his 
whole body. He struggled to rise, but his strength gave way and rage 
ailed his breast, for he knew that he could no longer fight for his college 
and the girl he loved. It seemed many long minutes before, struggling, 
protesting and almost sobbing, he was carried to the side-lines and 
wrapped in blankets while the team stood disconsolately around him in 
sympathetic and distressed silence. But no one knew that the injury 
had been done with intention. 

There was a pause, for the first half was over and the people were 
standing in excited groups— laughing and calling to each other, their 
voices hoarse with cheering. A little group of men with anxious, 
troubled faces carried Winthrop into the field house and came out 
again to answer the many inquiries with a shake of the head. But 
although sobered by the accident, the Princeton crowds were still wildly 
jubilant and the Yale men scowled darkly at them across the inter- 
vening space. 

Marion sat quietly in her place with her hands tightly clenched in 
her muff, gazing towards the house into which Bob had disappeared. 
She was wondering, wondering how he had been hurt and trying to fight 
the ever recurring suspicion that crossed her mind. Could it be, and 
oh, how was it all to end ? 

And then the second half began, and slowly but surely the Yale 
team free now from the overwhelming power of Winthrop's attack- 
made its way down the field. The Princeton team fought gallantly 
and often the tide turned and the ball was brought back to the middle 
of the field. At last, inch by inch, and amid a deafening storm of 
cheers and a whirl of blue flags, the ball went over the Princeton goal 
line and the score was tied. Almost immediately time was called, for 
it was almost dark and quite late. 

The stands emptied with almost incredible swiftness and there was 
a mad rush towards the two teams, who stood in the middle of the field 
cheering lustily for each other and themselves. Both sides were tri- 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 



uinphant and both were a little disappointed, and yet both cheered andj 
shouted, sang and danced, bearing the players high upon their shoulders 
and striving to outdo one another in noise and confusion. 

Marion found herself clinging to her father's arm and borne, bewib 
dered and breathless through the gates and out upon the streets of the 
town. They reached the Inn before she could speak — then it was only, 
"Father, I must find out about Bob." 

"Very well, daughter, I will go back and ask, but now you must go 
to your room and rest. Remember the dance to-night." 

She obeyed meekly and went slowly up the stairs to her room, where 
she sat wearily down in an easy chair with the feeling that all she could 
do now was to await developments. 

Half an hour later a boy came to her door with a message — a gentle- 
man was downstairs waiting to see her. She had expected this and 
went unhesitatingly down to the small reception room. As she reached 
the door ISTesbit sprang to his feet and came quickly across to her — 
"I've won you, Marion, there's no doubt about it. If we had only had 
time we could have easily pushed them over for another touchdown. 
They were as weak — " He stopjDed suddenly, seeing the look in her eyes. 
"Joe," she said very quietly, "Joe, first tell me how it all happened ? 
How was he hurt ?" And looking into his face she saw him shrink 
back as from a blow. 

u Oh," he cried brokenly, "how could you blame me when it was for 
you, when to lose meant that I must leave you forever !" 

But she faced him now with angry, flashing eyes. "Did you think," 
she said scornfully, "that you could win a woman's love through dis- 
honor and foul play ? ISTo, no ; it is over now. I can only say that I 
am sorry, very sorry to have caused you by my thoughtless words to 
sacrifice your honor !" 

Nesbit looked hopelessly at her flushed, indignant face. "Then it 
is good-bye," he said dully, and her only answer was a repetition of his 
words, "Yes, it is good-bye." 



When Winthrop awoke to consciousness he looked dazedly about him 
until his eyes fell upon a slight figure standing with her back turned 
toward him. It was some time before he began to wonder why she was 



The St. Marys Muse. 



not dressed in a nurse's costume, as might be expected, and then his 
heart gave a great throb and he half lifted himself from his bed. At 
that she turned and he saw Marion's glowing face and outstretched 
;arms, as she came and knelt beside him. His heart was too full for 
ispeeeh, but he bowed his head upon the golden one beside him and a 
great peace filled his soul. 



A Little Glimpse Abroad. 



MARGARET ROSALIE DU BOSE. 



Dear Girls : — The Isle of Marken sounds very foreign and far off, 
doesn't it ? but it didn't to us last summer, when we decided to take an 
all-day trip there from Amsterdam. AVe three girls were traveling to- 
gether and we expected to have a perfect St. Mary's lark. When a fat, 
little Dutchman sold us our tickets and we were hustled on board a 
baby steamer, the most interesting thing was the crowd of passengers, 
of every nationality, all jolly and in for a holiday. After changing 
from steamer to train, and back to steamer again — and passing through 
the most fascinating country of fiat, green fields, neatly cut into squares 
by the canals, and ornamented by the most picturesque windmills — we 
reached the Isle of Marken. 

Positively it was as though we had stepped into a comic opera. The 
Dutch costumes are so dear, from the cute little white caps to the wooden 
sabots ; but on the Island everything was so overdone for the benefit of 
the rich ( ?) American tourists that it rather disgusted us. 

The little "Dutch doll" creatures waited until we crossed the gang- 
plank, and then grabbed each of us resolutely by the hand (drawing no 
distinction of age or sex) and demanded "pennies" (their one English 
word) at every step. All the grown-up occupants of the Island were 
grouped around their open doors, each urging the merits of a visit to 
his or her own abode — the whole thing being like a State Fair, with 
different departments ! "We" were a mixed crowd of about fifty, sup- 
posed to have a guide from the steamer, but imagine fifty girls keeping 
in sight of one teacher, when every little Dutch lane seemed to call you 
to explore it! So we wandered at our own sweet will. Finally, with 



10 The St. Mary's Musb. 



great reluctance, we turned our steps steamerward. What was our hor- 
ror on reaching the gang-plank to see the steamer calmly leaving us ! 
Then we were positively marooned on the Isle of Marken, and not one 
of us could speak a word of Dutch ! We began to grow worried. Just 
then four of our steamer-mates appeared and gazed breathlessly at the 
disappearing steamer. Thank goodness, they were Americans, too, and 
we immediately began discussing ways and means, when the cutest little 
Dutch skipper came up, and in the most delicious, unintelligible Eng- 
lish offered to take us across the Zuyder Zee in his boat. Of course we 
were delighted, and began to regard it all as one large picnic. We all 
got into the flat boat, several men on shore helped with the sail, and 
gave us a starting push, and we were off! Didn't it fairly feel pic- 
turesque to go plowing through the Zuyder Zee in full possession of a 
genuine Dutch boat and skipper ! But we didn't have much time to 
think of that. With the boat tilting at an angle of ninety-five degrees 
(more or less) the spray dashed over us in one continual shower. For- 
tunately we had on our rain coats and overshoes, so we simply raised our 
umbrellas and took our wetting like little men. 

We told our skipper good-bye at Volendam and strolled around for 
awhile. We watched some children coming from a spick-and-span 
Dutch school. One little fellow was so cute that we almost kidnapped 
him. An interpreter asked him his age, and he held up four tiny, 
grimy fingers, and even ventured to remark that his name was Corne- 
lius. We immediately dubbed him Vanderbilt and gave him a few 
pennies, which he jingled in his pocket with the air of a multi-million- 
aire and a smile of perfect bliss. 

Just then the funniest little house-boat came up and we all piled in. 
It looked like a very small floating street car, with a Dutch girl for 
conductor, and was moved by two men, one pulling with a rope in front 
and the other pushing with a pole from behind. Thus we reached 
Edam — proud possessor of the famous cheese and the "Dam Hotel." 

As we had missed our lunch wdien we missed our steamer, we longed 
for something more substantial than Dutch scenery. 

I had a strong St. Mary's belief in "little stores," so, in spite of our 
ignorance of the language, we stepped into a neat little shop, with a 
solemn vow not to come out empty-handed. The "Fraulein," who sat 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



knitting behind the counter, came out to wait on us, and our trouble 
began. We pointed to some sweet chocolate, so got that very easily, but 
could not make her understand that we wanted some crackers. We 
only had a few minutes to catch the train, and I was awfully hungry, 
when there came a happy thought. Very politely, and apologizing in 
most fluent English (which was all Greek to her) I turned to the neat 
row of cracker tins that ornamented one side of the shop, and began 
opening them, one by one. The first was empty, and so was the next — 
and the next ! Then it dawned upon us ! The whole side of the store 
was a fake ! All empty cans to make the store look prosperous ! ! We 
felt quite badly at having stumbled upon such a family skeleton (so to 
speak) that we rushed out into the street, while the good dame doubtless 
called down the wrath of Heaven on our impudent American heads. 

When we passed through Broek (which is the original spotless town, 
and lives up to its "rep."), a little Dutchie came under the car window 
and began to sing. The tune seemed familiar, some how, surely we 
knew it ! Some one exclaimed, "Why, its Yankee-doodle" ! Of course, 
but the words ! Even the gravest of our party shouted with laughter at 
the shrill little Dutch rendition of the familiar song. We three strove 
manfully to teach the youngster "Dixie," but all in vain ; he had learned 
his part and meant to stick to it. 

When we reached Amsterdam that night we were hungry and tired, 
but we certainly had memories of Dutch scenes, and clean little villages, 
and the people themselves, that would stay with us always. 

Take my advice, miss your steamer at the Isle of Marken and have 
the pleasure of crossing the Zuyder Zee in a sail-boat. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Sarah Prince Thomas, Editor. 



Washington's Birthday Exercises. 

On George Washington's birthday school duties were over at twelve 

o'clock, and at twelve-fifteen there was a joint meeting of the Literary 

Societies in the parlor to celebrate the day in simple and appropriate 

exercises. Miss Sallie Haywood Battle, President of the Epsilon Alpha 



12 The St. Mary's Muse, 



Pi Literary Society, presided, and seated with her was Miss Marguerite 
Thompson, President of the Sigma Lambda Literary Society. The 
program was as follows : 

1. Song: Star Spangled Banner. 

2. Reading: Extracts from Washington's Farewell Address. 

Miss Wilson. 

3. Song: Old North State. 

4. Tributes to Washington. 

Representatives from the Two Societies. 

5. Song: 0! Columbia, Gem of the Ocean. 

6. Reading: The Father of his Country. 

Miss Paula Hazard. 

7. Song: Alma Mater. 



The Student Recital of February 27th. 

The first of the evening recitals open to the whole school was given 
in the parlor Thursday evening, February 27. There had already been 
several of the afternoon recitals, and the way in which the program 
was rendered showed that the girls had profited by them. All the num- 
bers were exceptionally beautiful themselves and beautifully rendered. 
The vocal numbers were particularly good, and the two seniors, Misses 
Sumter and Hardy, certainly did themselves justice, Miss Sumter's num- 
ber being especially well chosen and well performed. The program 
was as follows: 

Shepherds All and Maidens Fair Nevin. 

Ruth Newbold. 

(a) Study Heller. 

(b) Prelude Chopin. 

Mary Shtjford. 

Moment Musicale Schubert 

Marguerite Halbin. 

Reveries Shelley. 

Frances Broadfoot. 

Barcarole Godard. 

Frankie Self. 

The Rose in the Garden Neidlinger. 

Jennie Belle Turner. 

Gavotte Strelezki. 

Ila Rountree. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

Beloved, it is Morn Aylward. 

Martha Francis. 

Valse, Brilliante Loewe. 

Alexina Hardy. 

Duet — With the Stream Tours. 

Misses Gilmer and Francis. 

Mazurk No. 5 Godard. 

Beatrice Sumter. 



A Programme Magique. 
Mr. A. F. Bowen, of A. & M. College, gave the students and faculty 
at St. Mary's a delightful amateur sleight-of-hand performance on 
Saturday evening, February 29th. First an unseen hand wrote the 
name of a poem, a flower, and a sum of figures, which only one or two 
people in the audience knew, on. a slate. Then, while we were wonder- 
ing about that, the magician began stealing roses from us, first an in- 
visible bouquet, which soon, under the touch of his magic wand, be- 
came a large, gay bunch. On and on he took us, showing us the 
Oriental priest praying for the favorable rice seasons, the Hindoo for- 
tune-telling clock, the educated pack of cards, on and on from one 
exciting event to another, until he began illustrating "Money is every- 
where and how to get it," What could appeal to a St. Mary's girl 
more ? He picked money out of the air, from his clothes, from the 
girls' hands and dresses, until he had quite a hat full. Alas, however, 
we do not possess a magic wand ! The end of the program came en- 
tirely too soon for us, and we thank Mr. Bowen most heartily for giving 
us such a charmingly exciting evening. S. 



Mrs. Andrews's Luncheon. 
Mrs. A. B. Andrews entertained a number of St. Mary's girls at 
luncheon on February 17th at her home on Blount street. The lun- 
cheon table was beautifully decorated, with a tall vase of red enchantress 
carnations and feathery fern. Tall glass compotes held olives and 
salted almonds. A delicious luncheon was served to the merry party 
assembled around the beautifully decorated table. Mrs. Graham 
Andrews assisted her mother in the reception and entertainment of the 
guests. 



14: The St. Mart's Muse. 



Those enjoying Mrs. Andrews' charming hospitality were: Misses 
Martha Ferebee, Frances Loomis, Rebecca Wood, Adele Davidson, Mat- 
tie Bailey, Eliza Morton, Glen and Catharine Fairley, Bessie and Mar- 
garet Erwin, Laura Meares, Lilias Pratt, Margaret Haughton and 
Passie May Ottley. 

A George Washington Party. 

Miss Elizabeth Thompson entertained at a lovely George Washing- 
ton party on the afternoon of February 22d. The house was beauti- 
fully decorated for the occasion. Soft, red light from shaded candles 
on cabinets and mantels, and the cheery glow of the fires, lent a merry 
light to the rooms. A George Washington game was played, the score 
cards being tiny red and gilt hatchets. The prizes were baskets of 
crystalized cherries tied with dainty bows of red ribbon. After the 
game a delicious luncheon was served, the cherry motive being carried 
out in the refreshments. The ice-cream was served in red and white 
baskets, the handles tied with bunches of cherries. 

Those who enjoyed Miss Thompson's hospitality were: Misses Meta 
Boykin, Esther Rembert, Bessie Arthur, Marguerite Thompson, Mar- 
guerite Le Cron, Isabel Hanna, Lena Everett, Helen Daniel, Lily Tay- 
lor, Mary Jones, Elizabeth Smith, Kathryn Overman, Lyman Grims- 
ley, Bessie and Margaret Erwin, Coatsie Benedict, Lula Taliaferro, 
Bonnie Broadfoot, and Passie May Ottley. O. 



School Notes< 



—On the evening of February the 22d The Muse Club gave a Bal 
Poudre. The Colonial Dames and their escorts looked very fine, with 
powdered hair and waving plumes. Ice-cream was sold in the grill 
room and every one seemed to have a good time. 

Everybody was glad to welcome Mrs. Sheib back, and her first ap- 
pearance at the morning assembly was greeted with great applause. 

—Blair Ptawlings and Georgia Hales have had visits from their moth- 
ers recently, and of course they enjoyed seeing them very much. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



— Vernon Holloway spent a week at her home in Enfield to recuper- 
ate from her sickness. 

— The Muse pictures are being taken, and crowds of girls go down 
with all sorts of costumes to "pose." 

— Martha Byrd Spruill went on a visit to her home in Louisburg on 
account of her health. 

— Miss Thomas spent a week with her brother in Columbia during 
February. 

— The heating of the Auditorium is progressing rapidly, and it is 
expected that the Auditorium can be used for any entertainments after 
Easter. 

— Mr. Lay spent a few days in Camden, S. C, recently, and was 
away on March 1st, so all the girls went down town to either Christ 
Church or the Church of the Good Shepherd. 

—A number of St. Mary's girls went to the Baptist University Feb- 
ruary 17th to hear Mrs. Southwick give Jeanne D'Arc." Mrs. South- 
wick was at her best, and the evening was thoroughly enjoyed by all. 

—On the afternoon of Washington's birthday Mrs. Pittinger delight- 
fully entertained several St. Mary's girls at dinner. The place cards, 
dainty little hatchets, and the decorations of red, charmingly carried out 
the idea of the day. The fortunate ones were Maud Bunn, Mary 
Bourne, Annie Wood, Marie Hardin, Blair Kawlings and Sallie Hay- 
wood Battle. 



TKe St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the 
Mttse Club. 



EDITORIAL. 



Lent. 



ThinKing. 



Have we ever realized how little we really think ? We do our work, 
and get our lessons in a sort of mechanical way because we have to or 
because we think it is our duty. We translate our Latin, French, Ger- 
man, or Greek, whichever it may be, merely to get it into English ; but 
do we really think about it when we are doing it, or do we merely get 
the meaning of the words ? And the papers that we write, do we think 
about them ? or do we write them simply to get them written % 



Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, N. c. 

; 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 
Geoegia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 
Eva Rogerson. Eleanor Randolph Wilson. 

Minnie Leary. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, Sarah Prince Thomas. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 



The quiet Lenten season has begun, and with it conies the thought of 
renewed effort in our work. It is the time of self-examination and the 
struggle for self-mastery. We must also strive to know ourselves. How 
many of us really know ourselves as we are ? How often do we think 
about ourselves, about our owti faults and failings, instead of about 
other people's ? This is the time for us to try to correct our own faults, 
and by so doing we can better help others to correct theirs. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



Can we not realize that half-an-hour s earnest, concentrated thought 
is worth far more than two hours thoughtless writing % Let us use this 
Lent as a period of thought, and see in the end if we have not accom- 
plished far more than we ever did before. 



With the Exchanges. 



The December InLook of Stuart Hall, Staunton, Va., is as excellent 
a number as its predecessors have been. We are glad to note a final 
statement in the matter of name, for we like "Stuart Hall" better than 
the more familiar "Virginia Female Institute," and yet we were of 
the number that were in doubt. Many thanks to "The Dragon," and 
long life and continued prosperity to the daughters of Stuart Hall. 



It is a pleasure to note in the February Bed and White a strong edi- 
torial in condemnation of the recent hazing episode, which attained so 
much notoriety. We knew of course that no sympathy for such be- 
havior was felt at A. & M. College, but it is well to have a frank asser- 
tion of the student position authoritatively given in the student pub- 
lication. 



* * 



The Chisel, of the Woman's College of Eichmond, comes this month 
to pay its quarterly visit. It is a good magazine, and we are especially 
interested in it on account of Sadiebelle McGwigan's connection with 
it as Exchange Editor. Those who knew her in '06 at St. Mary's have 
not yet ceased to regret her inability to get back to St. Mary's this year 

to finish with her class. 

* -K- * * 

The Acorn, of the Baptist University for Women, chronicles in its 
current issue the celebration of the first passing of the four hundred 
mark in the yearly enrollment, in honor of which event the students 
were given a holiday on February 18th. According to President Brooks, 
of Baylor University, this makes B. U. W. "excel all womens' colleges 
of the South in enrollment." The students of St. Mary's extend 
heartiest congratulations to their fellow-students of B. U. W. on this 
auspicious event. 



18 The St. Mart's Muse. 



The Editor of the Converse Concept writes a good editorial in the 
February number on the advantages of the woman's college over the 
co-educational institutions for the development of the best womanhood. 
The ideas are familiar and almost universally accepted in the South at 
present, but they are worth repeating that each of us may bear the bet- 
ter in mind the reason for the faith that is in us : 

"Segregate Versus Co-Edtjcation. — Four of the best years of one's life spent in 
the company of noble thoughts and high ideals can not fail to leave their impress. 
To be wise and at the same time womanly is to wield a tremendous influence which 
may be felt for good in the lives of generations to come. 

"The best education for a young woman is surely not that which has been proven 
fit for the young man. She is an individual as well as he, and her work gains as 
much as his by relating it to her own life. However, an institution broad enough to 
meet the various needs of the varied men can not also equally meet the various needs 
of the varied women. In the development of the best of us there are false growths 
and disharmonies that appear constantly at this age of immaturity, and it is only 
remedied by individual treatment which will throw him or her back in harmony 
with the present mental and moral environment. Can this individual training be had 
at a co-educational college? Could not the personality of each be better perfected at 
an institution built especially for the differences in each sex? In the education of 
women, attention should, as far as possible, be centered on those studies which touch 
more closely woman's work and woman's lives and which are most likely to develop 
their highest and truest womanly qualities. Is her ideal type to be the same as that 
of man? 

"Educated purely as woman with all her qualities of modesty, sympathy, 
patience, endurance, hope, courage, faith, loyalty, devotion to duty developed to the 
full, she is an untold power for good. Educated as man with her intellectual side 
developed at the expense of those gentler, finer qualities, she becomes unsexed and 
is robbed of more than half her strength and influence. So it is a reasonable pre- 
sumption that the same course of study will not yield the same results with different 
persons." 

* * -x- -x- 

Ti-ie Muse would acknowledge the following exchanges : Acorn, 
Chisel, College of Charleston Magazine, Concept, Davidson College 
Magazine, Elonian, Emory and Henry Era, Erskinian, Georgia Tech, 
Guilford Collegian, Horner Cadet, Inlooh, Maryland Collegian, Mer- 
cerian, Oracle, Quill, Bed and White, Seminary Blue Book, Tileston 
Topics, Trinity Archive, University Magazine, Vanderbilt Observer, 
Washington Collegian, Wesleyan, Western Maryland College Monthly, 
Winthrop College Journal. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 

IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



A funny old lady named Borgia, 

Had a parrot whose nerve would have floored yer. 

Her mistress would whack her 

And say, "Have a cracker," 
And that bird would say, "Fire, nut, or Georgia?' 



A Maiden's inconsistency. 
There was a young girl named Llewellyn, 
Who was lavish with letters when sspellyn, 
But she broke with her beau, 
And let bitter tears flow 
Because he addressed her as Hhellyn. 
[Dedicated to the spelling class.] 



Lines to a Crush. 
O thou, my Crush! Being beloved afar, 

Loveliest of all the maids that meet my view, 
What word breaks from thy lips, my guiding star, 
Addressed to thine adorer fond — 
"Skidoo!" 

Rapturous I gaze upon thy charms and sigh 

"Thy slightest word upon my heart is writ. 
Dost love me in return? Reply, reply, 

Angelic one!" And echo answers 

5 "Nit!" — M - D - a - in The Tattler - 



familiar Lines. 
(Arranged so that the Freshman can always remember them.) 
The boy stood on the burning deck, 
His fleece was white as snow. 
He stuck a feather in his hat, 
John Anderson, my Jo. 
"Come back, come back!" he cried in grief, 
From India's coral strand. 
The frost is on the pumpkin 
And the village smithy stands. 
Ye banks and braes o' bonny Doon, 
Across the sands o' Dee. 
Can you forget that night in June, 
My country, 'tis of thee! 

From The Maryland Collegian. 



20 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Anticipation and Realization. 
To sit and dream in study hall 
Of young men short and young men tall — 
That's expectation. 

To stand before the glass so long 
With powder puff and curling tong — 
That's preparation. 

To go downstairs so nice and sweet, 
And tall young men and short ones meet— 
That's presentation. 

To listen to one's love for you 
In a corner seat just made for two — 
That's revelation. 

To hear in the midst of his tale so sweet 
A clanging bell and approaching feet — 
That's disturbation. 

To just talk on, in spite of the bell, 
And have a teacher toll your knell — 
That's tribulation. 

— E. S., '08, in "The Seminary Blue Book. 



The Evolution of a Story. 



"Oh ! dear, Nell's been after us again to write that horrid old story. 

We'll never have any peace until we do it. In spite of dodging 'round 

corners and hiding in the basement she will nab us. So we might as 

well make an effort. What shall we write about?" 

"I tell you what. Let's write a love story and have it end up cute." 
"Bo you reckon everybody will think us sentimental ? I don't care. 

I think a cute love story is just darling." 

"I have a thought. Let's call it "The Lily Maid," and have it be an 

Easter story about a man and girl who have quarreled. Have 'em 

making up. And of course we must have Easter lilies all through it. 

Don't you think that would be fine ?" 

"Eor the love of Pete ! That sounds like a ten-cent dime novel." 
"You shut up, Betsey, it's better than you could do. Hush your fuss 

and let us begin." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



" 'It was one bright Easter morn in an old-fashioned Southern gar- 
len where a young girl was gathering both arms full of lilies for the 
ittle church near by. She looks like a lily maid herself, thought the 
all, handsome young man passing on the other side of the street — ' ''" 

"Oh, do let him have broad shoulders! I just love a man with 
>road shoulders !" 

;r Well, that's understood, you 'it'. No man could be tall and good 
ooking without broad shoulders. Were writing this story, Annie." 

"Well, I hope I'm sat upon — beg your pardon.'' 

"You needn't get so huffy about it. I'm sure the man never could 
lave had broad shoulders if he shrugged them like you're doing. Tell 
is what to put next." 

"Oh ! no, you're writing that story." r 

"Well, my land! don't tell us, then. Come on — we'll never get it 
lone if we stop to fuss." 

" 'The beautiful maiden did not raise her heavenly blue eyes to ac- 
knowledge the courteous salute of the youth until he stood in the lily 
warden beside her. Then the clinging clasp of her rose-leaf hands as he 
took them in his own — ' " 

"Romance !" from the other side of the room. 

"Shut up ! we had just got started good, and you spoiled it all." 

" 'But as his longing gaze met hers, she turned as white as her 
lilies—' " 

"Tragedy!" came from the same direction. 

"Do you think she's too pale?" 

A roar of laughter greeted this. 

"Too pale ? No, you had better write that sentence in white ink." 

"Oh, go to grass ! Of course I meant too silly." 

" 'He clasped her in his arms and, standing amid the lilies, he pressed 
her to his heart' " — 

"Praise Pete ! You know Nell will have a fit when she reads that. 
She said our last one was awfully sickey and this is heap worse." 

"I don't care. I like that part and Nell was just trying to tease us 
when she said that." 

"That ending is darling, I think, and Betsey and Annie, you all 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 

needn't laugh in that sarcastic way. I'd like to read one you wrote 
Your man wouldn't be anything but a stick." 

"We're not laughing, we're just smiling out loud. And no one couh 
dispute that your man has plenty of feeling. We like loads of senti 
ment, of course; think it's attractive, especially in a cute love story!' 

"Well, I hope Fell will like it, and if she doesn't take this I'll neve- 
write another thing for The Muse as long as I live. Thank the land 
it's done at last. Let's take it to the office." 

Mary C. Shueord. 
Ida J. Rogerson". 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh, 
f Mrs. M T. Leak, Durham. 
„ ! Mrs. 1 M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, 1 Mrs F p _ Tuc .^ er -, Raleigh, 

l_ Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



Bear in mind Ahrmnse Day, the twelfth of May. 



The Muse would extend hearty thanks to the Alumna?, who, by their 
response to the editorial in the last Muse, have furnished the Alumna? 
matter for this number. May others follow their example and so put 
the Alumna? news on a broader and more satisfactory basis. 



Inasmuch as the special Alumnae Muse is now in preparation for 
publication in the immediate future, and will be given over entirely to 
the publication of articles and news especially intended for the Alumna?, 
the department in this Muse foregoes the publication of any great 
amount of matter. Alumna? news has seemed rather scarce the past 
month. 



In addition to the accounts of the celebration of Founders' Day by 
the Alumna? in the different towns and plans for the Alumna? Day 
celebration in May, the Alumna? Muse will contain several decidedly 
interesting articles in reminiscent vein by Alumna? of the early days, 
including an article on the Chapel by Miss Adelaide Smith, of Scotland 
Neck, and a series of recollections of the '40's by Miss Ellen Brownlow, 
of Greenville. Mr. Marshall DeLancey Haywood, the Raleigh histo- 
rian, will also contribute an article on the Ravenscroft portrait. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 9 (February, 1908), being really the catalogue 
of the School, has just come from the press. It differs little in essen- 
tials from the last catalogue. Copies of The Bulletin as issued are 
mailed to the subscribers of The Muse ; but should any member of the 
Alumnae or reader of The Muse wish a copy for herself or to have a 
copy mailed to a friend, the Rector will be glad to send a copy on request. 

The next issue of The Bulletin will be the Alumnae List, and it is 

? ; 

hoped that its publication will lead to much additional information of 
the Alumnae and will awaken added interest among the Alumnae gen- 
erally. 



Communications. 



Atlanta, Ga., March 3, 1908. 
Dear Muse: — It was with keen regret that I saw recently in one 
of the newspapers here the enclosed notice of the death of Elmer 
George's father. Besides those who had the pleasure of knowing Mr. 
George personally, there are many who will recall that Commencement 
Day, when, during the service in the Chapel, Bishop Cheshire unex- 
pectedly stepped aside, and asked Mr. George to speak to us for him. 
Our acquaintance with the speaker through the delightful talk which 
followed, makes us fellow-mourners with Elmer, but also leaves us a 
deathless memory of Mr. George's intellectual gifts and his gentle per- 
sonal charm. 

Yours sincerely, '04. 

Marietta, Ga., Feb. 11.— Rev. T. M. N. George, Rector of St. James's Episcopal 
Church at Marietta, died at the church rectory Tuesday morning at 2 o'clock, after an 
illness of several months. 

Mr. George was born in Marietta in 1857, and was ordained at St. James's Church 
when a young man. His father was an Episcopal minister, and he has three brothers 
who are in the Episcopal ministry. He succeeded Rev. C. T. A. Pise as Rector of 
St. James's three years ago, coming to Marietta from New Bern, N. C. 

He is survived by his wife and three children, Miss Elmer George and Messrs. 
Frank George, Nelson George and Robert George, and several brothers and sisters, 
among them being Mrs. John Candler, of Atlanta. 

The funeral will be held in Marietta probably Thursday, and will be conducted 
from St. James's Episcopal Church. 

Bishop Nelson, of Georgia, the Bishop of North Carolina, and a majority of the 
Episcopal ministers in Georgia will attend the funeral. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



Mr. George was greatly loved by his congregation, and the people in Marietta, and 
his death is greatly regretted. He was an able speaker, a devout Christian, a deep 
scholar, and was recognized as one of the leading ministers in the Episcopal Church. 

[Eev. Mr. George while Rector at New Bern served for several years 
as a Trustee of St. Mary's from the East Carolina Diocese.] 



A Glimpse Back.- 

Ridgeway, S. 0., March 8, 1908. 
My Dear Miss Katie : — I see in the copy of The Mijse that came 
to Rita that you are wanting a photograph of my mother to fill a space 
on the wall of a room along with those of others who have been connected 
with St. Mary's. It will give me pleasure to send you in a few days a 
good engraving of her, both as she was taken at the time she celebrated 
her fiftieth birthday there, and as she is of later years. I would be 
glad to have you place that which you consider the most appropriate in 
the school and keep the other as a reminder for yourself of the days long- 
ago. I remember so vividly myself, and so pleasantly, the time I was 
an inmate of St. Mary's when she was in charge, for a few months. 
Sanborn was just taking charge of his work — a boyish and enthusiastic 
bachelor. Mr. Smedes took me out a hunting with him, and I came 
within an ace of shooting off his hat — so he didn't ask me to go again. 
But, best of all, there were the Christmas holidays, with tramps around 
in the snow with Louise Boyd, who was a wonderfully fine character, 
and the Steiner girls and the Ravenel twins, and the sweet and gifted 
Battle and Smedes girls, and so many others that I can recall, some 
now dead, and none of whom I have seen since. It ivas the days of 
Florence Slater, Emmie McVea, and Miss Czarnomska, all so fine and 
doing so earnest work in their lives. 

I am looking next week to have mother here for a time. She soon 
will be 78, and is nearly totally blind, but otherwise far from decrepit. 
I trust you remember the writer as well as he does you, and I am, 

Yours faithfully, Richard Ashe Meares. 

[The engravings which Mr. Meares so kindly supplies, and which we 
have been "anxious to obtain, are pronounced excellent by those who 
knew and know Mrs. Mears. They will be reproduced in the Alumnse 
Muse for the benefit of her many friends.] 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Tribute to the Late Mrs. Minnie Vaughan Griffin. 

Entered into rest at her home in Elizabeth City, E". C, on Thursday, 
February sixth, Mrs. Wrn. J. Griffin, after an illness of only three days. 

Mrs. Griffin was known to St. Maryans of 1879-80 as Minnie 
Vaughan. She will be remembered as a quiet, gentle girl, very modest 
and unassuming, but with a character which impressed all who knew 
her with a sense of its purity and rectitude, and of the steadfast devo- 
tion to duty, which was then, and always, its keynote. 

I was Minnie Vaughan's deskmate at St. Mary's, and knew her in 
later years, only to love and admire more and more the beautiful nature 
which unfolded so harmoniously in the widening experiences of life. 

In every relation, as wife, mother, friend, she filled the ideal of Chris- 
tian womanhood. Hers was the charity that thinketh no evil, the faith 
and hope that sustained her through the crushing grief of widowhood. 

It was not a long life, but one so full, so well rounded, that in her 
sudden taking off, with all the aching sense of loss, there is no feeling 
of incompleteness. She has learned all our earth could teach her and 
has passed into a higher school. 

Minnie Albeetson. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
eaders of The Muse; generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
>rinciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
hem to advertise in The; Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
t is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

SALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

EEMEHBEE IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



The 1908 Annual Muse. 

The Year Book of the Students of 

St. Mary's. 

Ready for delivery about May 15th. 

$2.00 per copy delivered. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 



Dry Goods 

OF ALX KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' EnSTE SHOES ASP SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Favcy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N". C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
W. N. Jones Vice-President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier 
J. B. Timberlake, Ass't Cashier. 

AH patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New account*, solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 



The Cztzsens National Ban 

RA LEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cash! 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department 
superbly equipped for the prompt and prop* 
execution of fine church work such as Altar 
Pulpits, Ledums, Prayer Desks, Litan 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and simiU 
furnishings. Write for special church fu 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT OO. 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 



"Why it is you call money dough ?" 
Asked a fair maiden ef her beau ; 

And grinning wide 

The youth replied, 
"Because T knead it so." 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Cont racto rs and Engineers. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. HargettSt. 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL <fc BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Advertisements. 



art-Ward Hardware Company \ f , C. STRONACH'S SONS CO. 



EALEIGH, K. C. 

ast of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Keisey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY 

"The Little Store." 



GROCER© 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Coruer FayeUevilie and Hargett Streets. 



BTJ$INE$$ MANAGER'S $ONG. 

How clear to my heart 

1$ the ea$h for $ub$cription, 
When the generou$ $nb$criber 

Pre$ent$ it to view; 
But the one who won't pay ; 

I refrain from de$cription, 
For perhap$, gentle reader, 

That one may be yon. 



M. ROSENTHAL 



GROCERS 



WILMINGTON ifc ITARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 



ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OK ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

UsetM best: THE WELS3ACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS ANB ELECTRIC GO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



SAL V A TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing - Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 g. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHOEN Co., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, p 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

— 
JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



When the donkey saw the zebra, 
He began to switch his tail, 

"Well, I never !" was his comment, 
"Here's a mule that's been in jail." 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N. O, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber, 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. safe i y Headache in all its forms. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of ^orth Carolina. 
Ralei gh, N. C. 

H.ST EINM ETZ , 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds ' 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 

ROBT SIMPSW*^^ 



Advertisements. 



HE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy — China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER I'OMPftNY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




DR. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 

H. T. HICKS CO. 
Fob Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of Ale Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

W. B. MANN, 

11 E. Hargett St.. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 

"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



Miss Amelia May Hortense 
Tried to climb a barbed-wire fence ; 
When she had finished with the climb, 
She had had a ripping time. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

PULL INFORMATION FREE. 

BARRETT & THOMPSON. 

Architects and Engineers, 
raleigh, n. c. 



PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pnllen, Fres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus $50,000. Deposits over 
$750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AMD BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 
107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



School Calendar, I907-'G8. 



MARCH-APRIL, 1908. 



March 4th, Ash Wednesday. Holy Day. Lent begins. 

March 26th, Thursday. Last Quarter opens. 

April 12th, Palm Sunday. Bishop's Visitation for Confirmation. 

April 17th, Good Friday. Holy Dav. 

April 19th, Easter Sunday. 



Order of Services at St. Mary's Chapel. 



Holy Communion each Sunday throughout the School Session. 

First and third Sundays at 11 a. m. 

Other Sundays at 7:50 a. m. 
Holy Communion on Saints' Days and on Ash Wednesday, the Feast of the Annun- 
ciation (March 25th), each day in Holy Week except Good Friday, and on 

Monday and Tuesday in Easter Week at 7 a. m. 

LENT, 1908. 

Shortened Morning Prayer : Mondays at 8 : 05 ; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays 

at 9 a. m. 
Litany: Wednesdays and Fridays at 9 a. m. 

Shortened Evening Prayer (Voluntary to the School), with brief address Mondays, 

Wednesdays and Fridays at 5 : 30 p. m. 

(Prayers in the .School Room on these days at 6:35 p. m.) 
Shortened Evening Prayer: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:35 p. m. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TEEMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1909. 



Si. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. TlHE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: J ^ THE AR1 SCHOOL. 



5. 1HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1907-08 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment Mew. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Stein way Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education ivithout slight 
to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and otlier information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



tEastiu- ?Jumb?r 




Si ilanj 



■ "^TP" 1 ^"*^ ■« 







\ 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



EASTER NUMBER. 



Vol. XII. April, 1908. No. 7 



The Day of Resurrection! 

Earth tell it out abroad; 
The Passover of gladness, 

The Passover of God. 
From death to life eternal, 

From earth unto the sky, 
Our Christ hath brought us over 

With hymns of victory. 

Our hearts be pure from evil, 

That we may see aright 
The Lord in rays eternal 

Of resurrection-light ; 
And, listening to His accents, 

May hear so calm and plain 
His own "All hail," and hearing, 

May raise the victor strain. 

Now let the heavens be joyful, 

Let earth her song begin, 
The round world keep high triumph, 

And all that is therein; 
Let all things seen and unseen 

Their notes together blend, 
For Christ the Lord is risen, 

Our joy that hath no end. 

(Old Greek Hymn; tr. J. M. Neale.J 



April Fool. 



Jack was down by the Bay picking daffodils. Now, yon might pic- 
ture to yourself a tall, angular person snatching off the yellow heads 
of the poor little daffodils and crushing dozens of them beneath his 
big feet, in true masculine fashion. But this Jack is some one en- 
tirely different. All nature seemed in love with her. The warm 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



April breeze blew little curls in her eyes ; and the artful old sun trie 
to make her hair outshine the gold of her daffodils. The bits c 
fleecy clouds scurried here and there across the sky to see which coul I j 
get a better glimpse of her ; and, as for the daffodils, they vied wit 
each other in dancing in the breeze, each hoping to be added to th 
favored group in her arms. 

Across the Bay came the splash of oars, and then a clear, high whisjll 
tie. Jack waved a slim hand to the white-flanneled figure, and watched 
the wind-browned young fellow as he tied his boat. 

"Gee! but you look stunning this morning," he called half-wa^ 
across the lawn, as he came sauntering over, hands in his pockets, ii 
his usual lazy fashion. This remark was not like his wonted indiffeijl 
ence, but she paid no attention. 

"For Heaven's sake, Harry, don't step all over the flowers ! Now 
just look what you've done — crushed three. You horrid thing!" 

"Darn it all ! A girl is always fussing, and she doesn't even appre- 
ciate a compliment when she hears one," said Harry in aggrieved 
tones. 

"Oh ! I'm too wise to believe anything I hear to-day— it's April Fool, 
you know." 

"I always mean what I say to you/' coming nearer and trampling 
two other harmless little daffodils. "You know I'm just crazy abou't 
you, I've always cared more for you than all the other pretty girls 
put together, and " 

<<Oh! Harry, you can't do it," broke in Jack, laughingly, "you're 
entirely too young and unsophisticated." 

"You always have treated me like I was a kid," getting on his dig- 
nity now, "but I wish you'd remember, Jack, that I'm out of my teens, 
besides being two years your senior." 

"How distinguished he looks when he gets dignified," she observed 
to the daffodils, "I like him when he looks like that !" 

"Come, go for a row— you haven't anything else to do," he said, 
changing the subject as he found he was being worsted. 

"No, I can't go. What would T do with my flowers ? And I'd get 
my skirts all bedraggled." 



The St. Maky's Muse. 3 



"Oh, pshaw ! Girls are nothing but 'fluffy-ruffles' any way/' he said 
lisgustedly, but with an admiring glance at her white dress. "You 
\in go, too," — and so she went. 

: She leaned back, dipping her hand in the cool water, and lazily 
patching the play of the muscles in the strong, sun-burned arms, as 
be two skimmed across the clear water, dancing in the sunlight. He 
?as really an awfully dear boy, but she did so love to tease him. Op- 
wsite her, the boy for once was silent, with his eyes lingering on his 
ompanion's face. He had never before noticed how long her eye- 
ashes were, nor how blue the eyes underneath them. Perhaps the 
old of the daffodils against her face made it more evident. He won- 
dered if the flowers understood how blessed they were. How much 
kin the girl seemed to them. An old song flashed across his mind — 
" Thou art so like a flower, 
So fresh, so sweet, so pure." 

As he helped her from the boat, on their return, some of the yellow 
ups dropped into the water. He watched them a little longingly as 
hey floated out, remembering how they had kissed her cheek. "Jack," 
aid he, hesitatingly, "will you give me a daffodil ?" 

"You don't want one. Boys don't care for flowers. You even 
rampled on them." 

"If you care for me you will do as I ask," he answered seriously. 

The girl carefully selected the freshest one, and slowly advanced it 

oward him, with downcast eyes, but a keen observer might have caught 

l mischievous gleam beneath those long lashes. The flower brushed 

lis outstretched fingers, but suddenly it was snatched back, and gather- 

'ng up her ruffles, Jack ran, laughingly, Wward the house, calling bacK 

»ver her shoulder, "April Fool !" 

******* 

The daffodils were again in bloom. To the girl, sitting on the rustic 
>ench, everything was beautiful, the sparkling water, the dancing daf- 
fodils and the warm sunlight throwing a glamor over all. But the 
man at her side had eyes for nothing but her. 

"Don't look so gloomy, Harry," she said at last teasingly," cheer up, 
;he worst is yet to come." 

He flushed and muttered something under his breath. 

Muse 2 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Why do you treat me so?" he demanded miserably. 

"Aren't those daffodils the prettiest things," said she, irrelevantly. 

He ground a little daffodil savagely into the earth with his heel. 

"Don't vent your wrath on the poor little daffodil, Harry. That's 
so childish." She knew this was a telling shot. 

How he would like to shake her! He didn't know why he kept on 
so long to be treated like a dog. 

"Look here, Jack, I'm serious now — " 

"Serious, for once, Harry ?" She broke in innocently. 

"Yes, I am. Two years ago today you made a fool of me and you 
have been doing it ever since. Sometimes, I think there is a little 
hope for me. Yet, when I tell you how much I care, you only laugh at 
my love and make fun of me. You can not help but know that without 
you I could not, yes, would not live." 

'Twould be a pity, truly, for a youth to die so young," she mur- 
mured demurely. 

This was the limit. She had gone beyond endurance. He strode 
towards the boat but half-way down he wheeled and with stern lips and 
thrown back shoulders demanded: 

"Tor once and all I want my answer." 

She glanced at the strong set face and then, in spite of fast beating 
heart said daringly, mockingly: 

"I'll be a sister to you, Harry." 

Quietly he turned and walked to the water's edge without a word, 

He was really going? 

He heard a swish of skirts, felt a touch on his arm and turning — 

"April Fool," said the girl. 

Mart C. Shuford. 
Ida J. Rogersojst. 



LooK Up. 



Though the dreary rain is falling, 
From the woods there comes the calling 
Of a mocking-bird that's singing 
For the wearv world to hear. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



" Ye disconsolate and weary, 
Though the day be dark and dreary, 
In my heart the hope is springing 
That the sky will yet be clear. 

" When this gloomy storm is over, 
Then the rain-drops on the clover 
Will be shimmering and shining 
To repay us for the rain. 

" Therefore think ye on the morrow 
And forget your present sorrow; 
It is useless to be pining, 
For the sun will shine again! " 



Sebena C. Bailey. 



I, Said the Fly- 



I belong to one of the oldest Fly families in this block, and my An- 
cestors for many generations back (even as far as a whole year) have 
lived in a Newspaper Office. I suppose that has developed my brain 
to an extraordinary degree and given me such a love for literature that 
1 used to spend the whole night crawling over the newly-printed sheets 
of the Morning Herald. With such strenuous mental labor I be- 
came thin and nervous, until my wife declared we must move; the 
Newspaper atmosphere was too great a strain for everyday life. We 
were packing up the furniture in our snug little home (an empty Huy- 
ler box), when suddenly the cover was clapped on and we were in utter 
darkness ! After what seemed an age, the cover was removed and out 
we buzzed to find ourselves in a new country (which we afterwards 
learned was the snug bachelor quarters of the young Assistant Editor). 

My wife insists it was by chance, we came there,— but women are 
so illogical ! Now my plan of reasoning is very clear. Flies are evi- 
dently of much importance to men, and are equally admired and 
feared by them. For, (Number one) I have often read in our paper of 
Flies being a most important factor in baseball games. (Number 
two) Only the other day I noticed in big headlines, "Man ran over 
and killed by a fly on 24th street." (Of course that fly must have been 



The St. Mary's jIuse. 



a rather well-developed member of our family.) After reading that 
headline, I tried running as hard as I could over the bald head of my 
chief enemy, the City Editor. Kill him ? Well, I guess not ! He 
simply gave his head a resounding slap, which came very near putting 
me out of business for life. (Number three) Flies occupy a most con- 
spicuous place in the literature of men. Why, in that epic of all ages 
(any cultured person will know what I mean) there is a whole verse 
devoted to our race, which begins, 

" I," said the fly, 

" With my little eye." 

After these reasons, you will admit that the Assistant Editor most 
probably kidnapped us on account of our importance and value — that 
is my opinion. 

However that may be, we were very happy in our new home, and 
devoted the morning to exploring expeditions, and the afternoons to 
reading Magazines. But the chief event of the day was the mail. 
Whenever the Assistant Editor opened a letter, we two were there, 
ready for the news. My wife always made me begin at the head of 
the letter, while she began at the bottom and crawled up. Woman's 
curiosity is noted, and of course she always new first to the "P. S." 
We soon became well acquainted with all the Editor's correspondents, 
especially one who signed herself Alice. Her "P. S.'s" were some- 
times pages long, and the Editor would often read her letters five times 
over, without stopping — (which I must admit provoked me, as I was 
anxious to see the more important news). My wife would crawl over 
the lines as often as he read them, and once she said, if she had ever 
wanted to send any love letters, she would have written just what 
Alice did. 

One day an awful thing happened. The letter came, and I had 
hardly time to light on the top of the page when my wife flew up to 
me. "What can be the matter ? There is no P. S., not a sign of one !" 
Together we crawled over those few short lines. 

"You need not trouble yourself to call to-morrow. I am sending 
back your ring by the next mail." "They have had a misunderstand- 
ing," my wife whispered to me. "And they must make up !" Arn 
not all women born match-makers ? 



The St. Mart's AIuse. 



The Editor sat gazing into the fire, rigidly upright in his chair. 
Suddenly the gleaming flame reflected on the charm of his watch fob 
caught his eye. He opened the tiny locket and looked into the smil- 
ing eyes of the picture inside. "By Jove, she can't mean all that! 
I must see her myself." And he struggled into his great coat. My 
wife looked at me with a glance that meant, "Go with him, and report 
to me all that happens," and without a murmur I lit on his shoulder. 

"I had often ridden there before, but never for so long a distance. 
Finally, we went up some stairs and rang a bell. The servant who 
answered the door was evidently used to seeing the Editor, and ushered 
him into the sitting-room without a word. There before the fire, her 
face hidden in her hands, sat a young girl. She looked up when she 
heard us coming, and the sudden joy in her sweet brown eyes made 
even my fly heart beat the faster. "Douglas," she cried. 

And then being a well-trained and gentlemanly fly, I deliberately 
turned my back on them (though I was dying to look) and pretended 
that my sole desire in life was to crawl over the wall-paper. After a 
long, long time, I decided I could with perfect propriety resume my 
favorite seat on the Editor's shoulder. I buzzed over to where they 
sat, but I was too late— the Editor's shoulder was otherwise occupied.' 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose. 
[Republished by request from the 1907 Annual Muse.] 



" Biograpby of Three Roses." 



CAROLINE ASHE PARKER. 



'Twas a glorious May morning in the Florist's garden, birds were 
chirping in the bushes, butterflies flittering from flower to flower, and 
bees were busily gathering the sweet juice of the blossoms. Every- 
thing was full of life and happiness except three beautiful roses who 
were murmuring their complaints to the breezes. One could hear 
them whispering, "What is the use of our life here in this garden, 
when our beauty could do some mission of good out in the ugly 
world?" Just as they were deploring their fate, the gardener, mak- 
ing his daily rounds, seeing they had reached perfection, plucked and 
sent them rejoicing, out into the world. 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Several days later, they met in the Paradise of Flowers and related 
their missions in the world. "Mine was a gay lot," the first began. 
"I was bought, with many others, by a young man and sent to his 
bride on her wedding day. In her lovely wedding gown and veil, she 
resembled a rose ; as I was taken to the altar in the hand of my lovely 
one, I saw the exquisite decorations in the church, heard the impres- 
sive music, and saw the gay throng. After the wedding she caressed 
me lovingly and pressed me in her Bible as a remembrance of the sa- 
cred event. There my body still remains." 

"My life was a happy one, too," the large red one began. "I 
brightened the life of a poor little invalid. I was taken to her home 
by a good old lady who placed me in a bottle by her bedside. The 
room was dark, bare, and bleak, but I shed forth my sweetest fragrance 
and stayed bright as long as I could to cheer her. Every morning she 
fondled me until my life passed away ; then I was thrown into the 
street to be trampled into the dust, but what care I? I have lived and 
fulfilled my mission." 

"Neither has my life been in vain," chimed in the pale one. "I 
carried love and sympathy to sorrowing hearts, also, hopes of the 
Resurrection. I was placed in the folded hands of a little child whose 
spirit had flown to rest. The parents, overwhelmed with grief, seemed 
to find comfort in me ; seeing me not in full bloom they placed me on 
his breast, I was only a rose bud and he only in the bud of childhood, 
so our two spirits that had never tasted the full joy of life floated to 
their eternal homes. He was so white and quu t, and I, too, lay white 
and quiet, waiting to meet my friends in the "Paradise of Flowers." 



SCMCOL NEWS 



Alice L. Hines and Annie C. Wood, Editors 



The Rector's Trip to the Winston-Salem Conference. 

The Rector has recently returned from the first annual meeting of 

the Association of Presidents of the Woman's Colleges of the Caro- 

linas, which met at Salem College, Winston-Salem, March 15th. The 

majority of the presidents were present and much interest and enthu- 



The St. Mae-* s Muse. 



siasni was manifested in the meeting. The social feature was empha- 
sized, the wives of the members being included in the invitation to 
Winston-Salem, but though several of the ladies were present Mrs. Lay 
was unable to go. Mr. Lay was delightfully entertained during the 
meeting at the home of Mr. J. C. Buxton, one of whose daughters 
is an alumna of St. Mary's. He met several other St. Mary's girls 
while in Winston. 

A few minutes after his arrival Mr. Lay met Bishop Rondthaler, 
who was most courteous and with whom he had a special interest on 
account of his relation to St. Paul's School, Concord, with which our 
Rector was formerly connected. Later he was hospitably greeted by 
Miss Sadie Eobbins, of Raleigh, formerly a St. Mary's girl and now a 
Senior at Salem College. 

The first evening of his stay Mr. Lay gave a Lenten address at St. 
Paul's Church, and was cordially greeted by Rev. Mr. Cocke, the Rec- 
tor, and the people. 

Besides the business meetings, there were several social functions 
during the Conference, all of which were very delightful. The first 
was a public reception at the new Auditorium with addresses of wel- 
come by Bishop Rondthaler and the Mayor of Winston-Salem, and 
responses by visiting members of the Conference. The beautiful 
reception at the home of Dr. Clewell, President of Salem College, at 
which many of the prominent people of Winston-Salem were present, 
was also very enjoyable. Thursday the members of the Conference 
spent the afternoon in an enjoyable automobile ride through the city 
and surrounding country. 

On Thursday the chapel service at Salem College was held an 
hour later than usual so that members of the Conference could be 
present. The service was very interesting, both singing and responses 
being hearty. Thursday night there was a concert in the new school 
Auditorium. There were piano and violin solos and recitations. The 
new organ was heard under the skillful playing of the Director of 
Music and an unusually fine performer from among the pupils. The 
concert was very much enjoyed by all. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Friday at eleven there was a basketball game which Mr. Lay was 
unable to attend. 

The Rector altogether found Salem Academy and College a most in- 
teresting place both in its present and in its history. M. P. L. 



^Theatrical Season at St. Mary's. 
In former years, one of the most enjoyable features of the life at 
St. Mary's has been the numerous plays presented from time to time. 
This year, however, owing to an insufficient heating apparatus in the 
Auditorium these entertainments have been very few, and so most of 
them will be crowded into the Easter season. 

As the theatrical season in the cities is far advanced the best 
actresses have been obtained at a comparatively low rate, and thus the 
pupils of the school and the public at large can be given the advantage 
of the best productions at the uniform price of fifteen and twenty-five 
cents. 

The first play booked is under the auspices of St. Elizabeth's Chap- 
ter and is entitled "The Oxford Affair." Coming as it does on Easter 
Monday it can not fail to have a crowded house, and the plot is one that 
will attract all and interest even the indifferent theatre-ffoers. 

For May 2nd St. Monica's Chapter has, with much difficulty, se- 
cured Mr. Bowen, of the A. and M. College, for an "Evening of 
Magic." Mr. Bowen, whose power is only exceeded by that of Her- 
mann the Great, entertained the school once before this year, and from 
the number of girls left with eyes and mouths wide open St. Monica's 
Chapter need not fear but that they will have a full house. The 
evening is almost certain to be a great financial success also, for the 
way in which the magician takes money from every object in view is 
truly marvelous. 

St. Eltheldreda's Chapter on May 9th will present an operretta enti- 
tled, "Cinderella" or "The Dress Rehearsal" which is a play within 
a play. The scene is laid in a boarding school and the realistic diffi- 
culties attending the presentation of the play, will appeal strongly to 
all those who have gone through the same experience (especially Miss 

♦Readers will please take notice that neither dates nor performances are guaranteed. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



Fenner). Miss Martha Francis, the famous prima donna, takes the 
leading part and is sure to prove a drawing card. 

The great spectacular event of the season will be a farce in two 
acts entitled, "The Beauty Machine." (St, Margaret's Chapter is 
responsible for this, but as yet the date has not been decided.) The 
scene is laid in the court room of Queen Gueyela and the court cos- 
tumes of cheese cloth, which have recently been imported are truly 
elegant. The characters in costume are the queen, soldiers, guardsmen, 
court-ladies, etc. The Jesterina, Frances Loomis, bids fair to make 
the hit of the evening. No greater praise can be bestowed on this at- 
tempt than to say that it equals in gorgeousness the famous production 
of Kiralfy. 

On May 16th the season will close with a performance under the 
able management of Miss Yanita Cribbs. The cast is composed entire- 
ly of "stars," most of whom have proved their merit to us in former 
times. This play, which is entitled "A Bet," is one of rousing interest 
from beginning to end, and with the exception of the Shakespearean 
production of last year is without doubt the biggest thing ever at- 
tempted at St. Mary's. E - E - 

The Phi Mu Picnic. 

On Monday, April 28th, Phi Mu Fraternity gave a picnic in honor 
of one of its alumna, Susan Bynum. On account of a misunderstand- 
ing as to the date Miss Bynum did not arrive on Monday and the picnic 
had to be carried on without the guest of honor. Quite a number of 
guests were invited and the thirty odd girls mors than filled the picnic 
wagon. At eleven o'clock the band wagon arrived, the girls scrambled 
aboard, the feast was hoisted up, and with a crack of the whip the wagon 
"merrily rolled along," and the prelude had begun. The ride out to 
Edwards's Mill was just one jolly spree— the girls cracking peanuts 
and singing rollicking songs. But of course something had been for- 
gotten — no picnic could be complete without thai event — and two came 
racing after us with the bunch of bananas and the ice. 

When the party arrived at Edwards's Mill the feast was unloaded 
and spread out on the banks of the stream under the shade of a clump 
Muse 3 



Vl The St. Mary's Muse. 



of willows. The picnic proper could not have been better and the feast- 
ing ended with a lemonade toast to "the absent guest of honor," or, as 
one girl put it, ''Here's to Susan." After the lunch was over every one 
wandered around the hills and by the banks of the stream, gathering 
mountain laurel and lilies. 

At four o'clock every one was rounded up, and we began the return 
trip to St. Mary's. Every one had a jolly good time, and tired but 
happy, the girls climbed into the wagon, and began again the endless 
cracking of peanuts. The crowd returned through Raleigh, which 
turned out again to see so many happy girls packed tight in a brilliant 
red band wagon, and singing in all the abandon of youthful joy. Here's 
to hoping that Phi Mil's fetes may always be as successful as that match- 
less picnic of picnics. H. B D 



School Notes. 



—Mrs. Edward Brown, of Atlanta, Ga., spent some days in Ra- 
leigh to be with her daughter, Marjorie. She seemed very much in- 
terested in the school and came to see us very often. 

During her visit here she gave a delightful entertainment at the 
Yarborough to some of Marjorie's friends. Those present were Eliza- 
beth Smith, Passie May Ottley, Mildred Borden, Lyman Grimsley, 
Mora Belle Rosser, Martha Francis, Derryle Law, Isabel Hanna, Caro- 
lista Sandford, Carmalt Grimes. Irene Searle. Pauline Roughton, 
Frances Broadfoot, Mary Jones, Bessie Erwin, Coatsie Benedict, Nellie 
Kintner, Marguerite Halbin, Lula Taliaferro, Sadie Thomas,' Marv 
Wells, Martha Byrd Spruill, Martha Ferebee, Kathryn Overman, 
Elizabeth Thompson, Margaret McKimmon and Callie Hull, of Ath- 
ens, Ga. 

Although it is late in the year, we welcomed during the past 
month a "new girl," Jean Barron, from far-away Texas. 

—Lyman Grimsley, who went home on account of sickness, has re- 
turned to resume her school duties. We are glad to have her back 
again. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

—Martha Byrd Spruill, Eloise Robinson, Janie Patrick, and Bessie 
Erwin have been lucky in having some of their relatives visit them 
this month. 

— Lila Justice's father and little sister came to see her, and her sister 
stayed at the school and seemed to enjoy herself very much. 

—Georgia Hales, Coatsie Benedict, Mildred Borden, and Hallie Gar- 
rison were unexpectedly called home on account of the death of rela- 
tives. They have our deepest sympathy. 

—Mr. Lay spent the first week of April in the North, making a fly- 
ing business trip to New York and Boston, and a flying visit to Con- 
cord, his old home. 

— Inasmuch as the Junior Auxiliary is so largely represented at St. 
Mary's the suggestion of Miss Kate Cheshire, the Diocesan Secre- 
tary of the Auxiliary, the Rector has invited the representatives of the 
Auxiliary at the Diocesan Convention to meet in the Chapel at St. 
Mary's at 8 :30 p. m. on May 6th. 

We are very glad to have back with us Elizabeth Waddill, who has 

been unable to return before on account of her health. She has kept 
up her studies and will graduate this spring with her class. 

.Nancy Fairley, one of the old girls, was her? for a few days to see 

her sisters, Glen and Katharine. Nancy was here no longer ago than 
V S0 and is still pleasantly remembered by many of the girls here now 

— Laura Meares' father and mother came down from Asheville as a 
pleasant surprise to her. They were frequent visitors here during their 
stay in Raleigh. 

— On Palm Sunday the Bishop paid his usual visit to the Chapel for 
confirmation. The order of service for the day was slightly changed. 
Morning prayer was at nine and at eleven we had Litany, Confirmation, 
Sermon and Holy Communion. The service was very beautiful and 
impressive. Esther Rembert, Mary Wells, Mary Owen, Martha Byrd 
Spruill, Lucy Mann, Lila Justice, Mary Kipps, Virginia Prettyman, 
Elizabeth Battle, Frances Loomis and Miss Vedder were those con- 
firmed. 



i4 The St. Mary's Muse. 



— On Friday night, April 10th, there was a pupils' recital in the 
Auditorium. This is the first recital held in the Auditorium this year. 

— Mrs. Justice, of Greensboro, and Mrs. Prettyman, of Marion, 
S. C, came up to he present at the confirmation of their daughters. 
Mrs. Prettyman will he with her daughter until after Easter. 

— Mrs. Spruill, of Rocky Mount, came up to see her daughter, Mar- 
tha Byrd, confirmed. Martha Byrd accompanied her mother home to 
stay until after Easter on account of ill health. 

— Blair Eawlings' brother, Mr. Edward G. Rawlings, Jr., of Wilson, 
spent Sunday with her on his way to visit at Chapel Hill. 

— Augusta Divine was called home on account of the illness of her 
brother. Susie Hayes was also called home on account of illness of 
relatives. 

— Elsie Moore and Ha Rountree have gone home on account of ill 
ness. We hope to have them back with us directly after Easter. 



m^-a; 



The St. Marys Muse, 



Subscription. One Year. = ° ne Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in .he interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 
Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 

EVA R0GERS0N, ANNIE C. WOOD, REBECCA HILL SHIELDS, MINNIE LEARY, 

Sallie Haywood Battle, Alice Leigh Hines. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 

Ida Jean Rogerson and Mary C. Shuford, Assistant Business Managers. 



EDITORIAL. 



Easter is here at last, bright, happy, joyous Easter, and coming soon 
after Easter is Commencement, Commencement Sunday being the fifth 
Sunday after Easter. When we think how short the time is between 
Easter and Commencement we feel the need of bestirring ourselves 
more than ever, and this year we have more to do than ever. Every 
Saturday night is engaged for some entertainment or other— for at 
last we can use the Auditorium. 

Then there is the Inter-Society Debate which is to be held the first 
part of May. The query this year is, Resolved : That Lee has done 
more for the South than Jefferson Davis. The affirmative will be up- 
held by Mary Shuford and Nell Wilson of the Sigma Lambda Literary 
Society, and the negative by Ellen Duvall and Julia Mclntyre of the 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society. 

The choosing of the marshals is the first definite thing relating to 
commencement itself. The experience of last year has shown that 
seven instead of five marshals are needed because the size of the Audi- 
torium assures the presence of a much larger audience. The societies 
alternate in choosing the chief marshal, and this year it is Sigma 
Lambda's turn. The following marshals have been chosen for the 
commencement of '08 : 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Lyman Grirnsley, Caroline Parker '10, and Eva Rogerson '09, of the 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Society, and Mildred Borden, Chief, Sadie Thomas, 
Margaret Williams and Lula Taliaferro, of Sigma Lambda. 



The Muse acknowledges with thanks the receipt of the following 
March exchanges: 

Baylor Literary, Chatterbox, College Message, Concept, Emory and 
Henry Era, Erskinian, Davidson College Magazine, Guilford Colle- 
gian, Hone Scholastics, Homer Cadet, Maryland Collegian, Merce- 
rian Messenger, Orange and Blue, Fine and Thistle, Quill, Red and 
White, Reveille, State Normal Magazine, Trinity Archive, University 
Magazine, Vanderbilt Observer, Wesleyan, Washington Collegian, 
Western Maryland College Monthly, Winthrop College Journal. 



Death of Rear Admiral Balch. 



There was sadness mingled with the joy of the Easter season, occa- 
sioned by the death on the eve of Good Friday of Eear Admiral Balch, 
Mrs. Lay's father. Admiral and Mrs. Balch and Miss Balch had been 
spending the spring in Raleigh to be near Mrs. George Lay, and while 
Admiral Balch had been too feeble to go out as much as he otherwise 
would have clone, he had met many of the people of Raleigh who showed 
deep sympathy at his death. A brief fimeral service was held in 
Raleigh for the friends here at the home of Mrs. Rogers where the 
Balches were staying and the funeral party left for Annapolis on the 
afternoon of Easter Day, the funeral being held with full naval honors 
at the Naval Academy on Easter Monday. 

To quote briefly from the Baltimore News: 

Rear Admiral George Beall Balch, U. S. N., retired, who died yesterday in 
Raleigh of pneumonia, was the oldest flag-officer in the navy. He was in his 
eighty-fifth year. For over twenty years Rear Admiral Balch had lived in Balti- 
more, taking up his residence here after leaving Annapolis, where he had been 
Superintendent of the Naval Academy from 1879 to 1881. 

Admiral Balch was a remarkably interesting man, his long and conspicuous service 
in the navy having supplied him with the material for a fund of delightful remi- 
niscences, which he indulged in to the great pleasure of his friends. He was not a 



The St. Mary's Muse. IT 



club man. but he had been a great lover of chess. ... He was also a fluent 
writer and his war reports were noted for the strength and clearness of diction 
employed in preparing them. Capt. Henry F. Goddard said of him to-day: "He 
was one of the most lovable men in the navy and was universally recognized as 
such by all who served under him. His war record was exceptionally brilliant, 
and was repeatedly commended by his superiors. He was brave to a fault, but m 
private life was gentle as a lamb. He was eminently a religious man, and never 

used profanity. 

Admiral Balch was one of the last survivors of the famous expedition to Japan 
commanded by Commodore Perry in 1853. He was born in Tennessee. January 3, 
1821 and was appointed a midshipman from Alabama in 1837. He became a 
rear-admiral in 1878. He served in the Mexican War, and was present at the 
bombardment and surrender of Santa Cruz. He commanded the Pocahontas and 
then the Pawnee, and still later the Atlantic blockading squadron in the Civil War. 
From 1879 to 1882 he was Superintendent of the Naval Academy, was then com- 
mander-in-chief of the Pacific Station, and was retired in 1883. 

Surviving Admiral Balch are a widow, who was a daughter of the late Chief 
Justice Booth, of Delaware, two sons-Mr. Bloomer Balch of Maryland and Mi^ 
Francis Balch of New York-and four daughters-Miss Grace. Mrs. Frederick 
Sears and Mrs. Malcolm Gordon of Concord, N. H., and Mrs. George W. Lay of 
Raleigh, N. C. 

IN LIGHTER VEIN. 

CLIPPINGS FROM OUR EXCHANGES AND ELSEWHERE. 

I was assigned a pew in church, 

But to my sorrow find 
The girl I love to look at best 

Sits in the pew behind. —Blair Rawlings. 



Further Studies in English. 

THE GALLANT SWTJESNE. 

A gallant young man of Duquesne 
Went home with a girl in the ruesne ; 

She said with a sigh: 

" I wonder when Igh 
Shall see such a rain-beau aguesne." 

A BRAVE GIRL. 

She had on her finger a felon, 
She went to a doctor, did Helon. 

Said he: "Does it hurt?" 

The girl replied: "Cert, 
But I haven't done any yellon." —Denver Post. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



no "dead one" fob heb. 
A suitor, whose hair was bright red, 
To the girl he had chosen once said: 
"For you I would die." 
She replied: "If you try, 
Dye slowly but surely — that head." 

— New York Timet. 

BEITISH LOVEMAKING. 

I sat down beside my sweet Esther, 
And ardently, fondly caresther; 

But soon Esther cried, 

She sobbed and she sied — 
I don't know whatever possessther! 

— London Magazine. 

AT LEAST NOT PBOFANE. 

A decided brunette, by name Pickens, 
Was arrested for stealing some chickens. 

When they asked her to swear, 

She replied debonnaire: 
"I only know 'deuce,' 'darn' and 'dickens.' " 

— Lippincott's. 

HE*D DO HIS BEST. 

There was a young urchin of Wye, 

Who when asked, "Could he eat a mince pie?" 

Simply nodded his head 

As he artlessly said — 
"Bring out all wot you've got — an' I'll try!" 

canny! 
A canner exceedingly canny, 
One morning remarked to his granny, 
A canner can can anything that he can, 
But a canner can't can a can, can he? — Ex. 

Jack, end Jill. 

(As Developed by Longfellow.) 

On a hillside by a river, 
Lived the children of my story, 
In a wigwam dark and gloomy, 
Lived the little Jack and Jill. 
"Go, my children," said their mother, 
"Fill this pail with shining water — 
With the water, aqua clara, 
With the clear water, aqua clara." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



Forth into the sunshine walking 

Sped the little Jack and Jill, 

Never heeding, never seeing 

Where they went, or how they wandered, 

Till a root within their pathway 

Tripped the foot of little Jack. 

Tripped his foot, his pedes magna. 

Straightway like a comet rolled he, 

Ever farther, farther, farther, 

Down the steep and stony hillside, 

And the little Jill came after — 

Like a copy cat came after, 

Broke their crowns, their caput emptum, 

A la Hollins — caput emptum. — The Eollins Quarterly. 



Aunt Polly's Advice. 
Now ef you's wantin' perfect marks, just git down to work an' make 'em. 
You can put it down as sartin' dat de time is long gone by 
When all dat inspiration use to rain down out de sky. 
Ef you think about it keerfully an' put it to the test, 
You'll diskiver dat de teacher's plan is generally de best. 
Ef you go 'round complainin' at ev'rything in view, 
You'll find on 'vestigation dat de fault is all wid you. 
An' when your lessons git so hard you 'gin to shake and chatter, 
You needn't stan' dar like a fool an' argufy de matter. 
Or when them dreaded quizzes come an' you's feelin' blue, 
Don't walk aroun' an' say there ain't a thing for you to do. 
When you's feelin' dull an' lazy an' your duty you would shirk, 
It's better dan de zeros just to buckle down to work. 

— Hattie Collins, in The Bessie Tift Journal. 



Elegy in a Deserted School-Room. 
The school-bell tolls the knell of parting day; 

The chattering girls stroll slowly o'er the lea; 
The teachers homeward plod their weary way, 

And leave the school to reference work and me. 

Now fades the glimmering book-case on the sight, 
And all the rooms a creepy stillness hold, 

Save where the clock hand ticks its busy flight, 
And striking hours break the wint'ry cold. 

Perhaps behind this high glass door is laid 
Some book now pregnant with celestial fire, 

Which might my humble intellect have swayed, 

And waked my lowly thoughts to something higher. 



20 The St. Mart's Muse. 

But from the toil of great men, war and strife, 

My sober wishes ever yearned to stray; 
And to some other easier way of life 

I'd rather wend my solitary way. 

— F. S. '08, in the Seminary Blue Book 



To Be or Not to Be 
I'd rather be a Could Be, 

If I can not be an Are; 
For a Could Be is a May Be, 

With a chance of touching far. 

I had rather be a Has Been 

Than a Might Have Been, by far; 
For a Might Be is a Hasn't Been, 

But a Has was once an Are. 

Also an Are is Is and Am; 

A Was was all of these; 
So I'd rather be a Has Been 

Than a Hasn't, if you please. 

— Quoted in Georgia Tech. 



What the BroKernan Said. 
The shades of night were falling fast 
As through the railroad car there passed 
A brakeman with a visage red, 
And this is what he loudly said: 
"B-r-r gib." 

His hair was short, his jaw was long, 
His lungs were leathery and strong, 
And as we sped the landscape o'er, 
Once more he gave his awful roar: 
"B-r-r gib." 

"Oh, say," remarked an ancient Miss, 
"And tell me, please, what town is this?" 
The brakeman rolled his honest eye, 
Likewise his quid, and made reply: 
"B-r-r gib." 

"I'm bound for Niles," the drummer said. 
"Is this the town that lies ahead?" 
The brakeman sighed with weary air, 
And once again we heard this blare: 
"B-r-r gib." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



Then up we rose and madly hurled 
That brakeman forth into the world, 
And as he fell with anger vain, 
We heard again the wild refrain: 
"B-r-r gib." 

Next morn they found him as he lay, 
And planted him without delay. 
And now they've got another cuss 
Who calls the town and calls it thus: 
'Biz-z-zjkghtx." 



— St. Louis Times. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. M T Leak, Durham. 
VirTT-PuFSTriFNTs J M rs - x M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 

VICE-FKESIDENTS, < Mffi< p , p Tu( , kpr Ra l ei g Di 

(.Mrs.Kaie de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



Before another Muse appears Alumnae Day, May 12th, will have 
come and gone. We hope that arrangements are being made at each 
of the points at which alumnae meetings were held on Founders' Day 
for meetings on Alumnse Day and that it may be possible for the 
Alumnae at various other points to also arrange for meetings on the 
same day. 

While it seems unlikely at this writing that it will be possible to 
propose any special program for exercises in celebration of the day, 
The Muse will be very glad to furnish material to any Chapter wish- 
ing to have a formal program, and it is hoped that Miss Mc'Vea may 
be able to have in the hands of the Chairman of each meeting a report 
on the progress of the scholarship movement with recommendations. 

We also hope that each Chapter will arrange to send at least one 
delegate to St. Mary's for the annual meeting of the Alumnae at Com- 
mencement. The annual meeting this year comes on the afternoon of 
May 26th (Tuesday). 



The Muse has had no more constant friend than Mrs. W. E. Lind- 
say ("Ella Tew") of Glendale, S. C, whose letter it will give many 
pleasure to read in this number. We wish that others would follow 
Mrs. Lindsay's example and send us lists of the Alumnse in their locali- 
ties, with some little interesting notes of some of them, as she has done 
for Spartanburg. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



The deep sympathy of the Aluinnse has been during the past month 
with Mrs. Clem Dowd, Jr., ("Fannie Tunstall") of Charlotte, whose 
husband passed away at their home in Charlotte after a lingering ill- 
ness, March 2nd, and Mrs. K. F. W. Allston ("Beatrice Holmes,") in 
the death of her husband as the result of an accident, in the same 
month. 

Her many friends in Ealeigh have been delighted to see again Miss 
Florence Slater who, after a prolonged stay with her sister, Mrs. W. 
T. Carter, in Winston-Salem, has been making a brief visit to Mrs. A. 
W. Knox ("Eliza Smedes") in Ealeigh, before resuming her duties in 
the Flushing (K Y.) High School. Her health is much improved 
and she is feeling quite ready for work again. 



An Alumnae Letter. 



Geendale, S. C., April 9, 1908. 
Editors of The Muse: 

My Dear Girls : — Enclosed please find the amount due on my sub- 
scription to The Muse, with an apology for my tardiness. 

I also send a few names and addresses of Alumnae, perhaps you 
have them already, but I will take the chances. 

Miss Catharine Irwin, 1807. Miss Irwin is now housekeeper at 
Converse College, devoted to her church and interested in all that con- 
cerns it. 

Miss Sallie Carson, 1867. Miss Carson teaches the mill school at 
the Saxton Mills, a few miles from Spartanburg. She is a born 
teacher, and missionary as well, and works hard with the factory chil- 
dren, training them to be clean in body as well as clever in mind. She 
too loves her church with a love that is always asking, "What can we 
do to strengthen and extend the Kingdom of God?" 

Miss E. L. Tew, 1876. Miss Tew, like Miss Carson, is a devoted 
reacher, both in her own private school and in Sunday School. 

Mrs. W. S. Manning (Nina Horner), 1885. 



■24. The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss Jean Carson, 1905. Jean is on the stage and has had quite a 
satisfactory time with the troupe "Arizona" under exceptionally good 
chaperonage. Her travels have taken her as far West as Oregon and 
Washington and she has also played in Richmond, Atlanta and other 
large cities. Having demonstrated her ability to act and satisfied her 
desire for stage life, Jean has renounced the drama and will soon re- 
turn, her friends hope, to make Spartanburg her permanent home. 

I send in addition the names and addresses of a few Alumnae outside 
of Spartanburg: 

Mrs. McGowder Simpkins (Sallie R, Lewis, 1876,) Edgefield, S. C. 

Mrs. North Smith (Maggie Sinkler, 1876,) Limehouse St., Charles- 
ton, S, 0. 

Mrs. Wm. F. Jones (Sallie Fall, 1876,) Savannah, Ga. 

Wishing you all success in your efforts to secure interesting Alumna? 
data. I am, sincerely yours, Ella Tew Lindsay. 



The Mission WorK at Morganton. 



The readers of The Muse and the Alumnae of St. Mary's gen- 
erally are, we are very sure, much interested in the work that Mr. Du- 
Bose has taken up at Morganton. Though the life he now leads can 
not be much less strenuous than was that of his four years Rectorship 
at St. Mary's, the work is that for which his heart longed and the 
climate and out-door life in the mountain climate has entirely restored 
his health. 

A partial picture of his field work can be gotten from the February 
Leaflet which he issues to promote the cause to which he is devoting: 
his energies and from which we quote: 

The "Morganton Associate Missions" were begun in 1895 by the late Churchill 
Satterlee, son of the Bishop of Washington, assisted by a band of zealous St. 
Andrew's Brotherhood men, and grew during his Rectorship to The Good Shepherd; 
The Cross; St. George's; St. Stephen's (for colored people); and a beginning of 
St. Mary's Mission, at Quaker Meadows. 

During the Rectorship of the Rev. Walter Hughson, who succeeded Mr. Satterlee, 
St. Mary's Mission was fully established; St. Margaret's for the mill people in 
Morganton; St. Michael's in the South Mountains, and St. Paul's, nine miles away 
to the northwest were added, making now eight (8) missions, at seven of which we 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



have day schools, each with a resident teacher. At three of these missions we 
have nice" chapels, with the promise of one for St. Mary's, but in the other places 
we use for the present our school-rooms for the service, though they are always 
too small for the crowds who come, and not long ago, at a service at St. Paul's 
Mission, the crowd was so great that about twenty men were asked to put on their 
hats, button up their coats, and stand outside the open windows through which 
they could hear and take part in the service. 

In the seven-day schools we have enrolled 209 children, and on the Sunday School 
rolls, over 242 children, but when it is known that the adults are nearly as much 
a part of the Sunday Schools as the children, we are entitled to count fully 400 
on our Sunday School enrollment. 

In January, 1908, my assistant and I (besides my services in Grace Parish) 
gave the missions 22 clerical Sunday services, besides 30 lay-services on Sunday 
and many pastoral visits during the week. 

The Leaflet then tells in more or less detail of the size and needs of each of the 
missions. In connection with St. Michael's Mission it says: 

This mission is the most distant in my field; the roads are often impassable for 
a vehicle, and to reach it in winter I must go on horseback, and in the last mile 
before coming to the mission, I must ford a fork of the Catawba river eight times. 
This is sometimes dangerous and always unpleasant. Let me quote from the report 
of a former missionary: "Scattered widely over this district are the hardy South 
Mountaineers, so well known everywhere in the land. Most of them are isolated 
and secluded by force of conditions. The roads are easily the worst in the United 
States, and few who have never tried it would believe it possible to drive a horse 
and wagon over them. But the horses are trained to travel in the gullies, and 
sometimes it seems as if one were riding or driving on an elevated platform above 
the horse. For weeks, and sometimes for months, these roads are almost impassable, 
and yet they are for a large portion of the population the only means of transporta- 
tion and communication." 

The people of this mission are naturally more ignorant and poorer than in the 
missions in the more open country, and some of their one-room cabins, no more than 
15 by 18 feet, are truly not fit for any human being to live in, much less to be the 
home of a father, mother and several children; yet they seem content, and would 
ask you to take a meal with them and even to spend the night, should you care to 
stay. Here, if anywhere, in our Domestic Mission field is the need of educational 
and religious help. 

With an assistant Priest and our seven teachers we are doing our very best to 
educate and evangelize those committed to our care, and, to quote from the life of 
Churchill Satterlee, by Hamilton Schuyler, "It is a mistake to suppose because 
many of the mountain people are illiterate that they are not in many cases very 
intelligent, or because they live in poverty, that they do not possess many sterling 
virtues. They are hospitable, personally courageous, loyal to each other, uncom- 
plaining, and fair in their dealings." 

In their heredity they represent, perhaps, the purest strain of native Americanism 
to be found in the whole country. There is among them practically no admixture 
of foreign blood, and it is out of such stock that men like Andrew Jackson and 
Abraham Lincoln have arisen. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Reticent and slow in the presence of strangers, they are extremely sensitive to: 
criticism, and suspicious of the motives of those coming among them from the outsidk 
world. 

The faults prominent among them are those which naturally pertain to a rudt 
and simple people, living in a state of isolation, and who, for the most part, are a 
law unto themselves. 

The moral improvement among those who have come under the influence of the 
missions is a fact testified to by those who are familiar with the conditions which 
existed previously. 

A politician — not a member of our Church — who was in the habit, periodically, 
of making campaign speeches to mountain audiences, expressed his conviction that 
the change which had taken place was little short of marvelous. "Mr. Satterlee'g 
missions," he declared, "have done wonders for these people. I find everywhere 
more intelligent listeners. The people conduct themselves with greater propriety, 
they dress better, and seem to have a keener appreciation of moral issues." 

Considering all things, I do not hesitate to say that there is no field, anywhere, 
more purely missionary in character, nor a field where the needs of religion and! 
education are more needed. The field is ripe for the harvest; the laborers — though 
too few — are faithful and experienced, and what we need is help from those who 
love the Master's work. 

In conclusion, I need at once the support of a teacher at $25 per month, beginning 
January 1, 1908, and I need the salary of another teacher at $360 for the year to 
begin October 1, 1908. Ten ($10) dollars a year will support a scholarship at any 
school, and I would be glad to have twenty to fifty scholarships to place in the 
different schools. 

I need a fund of $100 to provide books for the eight (8) schools next fall. I 
need now $150 as a "Eepair Fund," having just spent (in faith) about $60 on re- 
roofing St. George's Mission, and I should spend $40 on painting the same buildings 
in the spring. I need $50 for printing such leaflets as may give notice to our 
friends of the work we are doing, and for printing blanks, etc., for school reports 
and church notices. A typewriter, and a magic lantern to illustrate lectures, would 
be of the greatest help in my work, and a private communion set is greatly desired, 
as I have none of my own, and must, for a private service, borrow from the 
parish set, which is too large to be conveniently carried on horseback. 

We need the prayers of all the Church that we may be wise to plan, and faithful 
to carry out the great work committed to our care. Will you help us? 

Faithfully yours, McNeely DtjBose, 

Rector of Grace Church and Priest in Charge of the 
February 12, 1908. Morganton Associate Missions. 



The St. Mary's Muse. M 



Easter Weddings, 1908. 



No group of marriages has for a long time been of so much interest 
to the younger Alumnae as the Smith-Higgs, Skinner-Pittenger and 
Jones-Mackay weddings celebrated this Easter season. Each of the 
brides is a Raleigh girl and an "old St. Mary's girl" who has kept up 
ber active interest in school affairs. Miss Pittenger and Miss Mackay 
are St. Mary's graduates of the Classes of 1900 and 1906 respectively, 
and Miss Pittenger taught in the school for several years, leaving xm 
finally in 1906. Their many St. Mary's friends wish Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Skinner and Mr. and Mrs. Jones evey happiness 
in their wedded life. 

The Muse would also extend congratulations and best wishes to Mr. 
and Mrs. Arnold Davis, of Wilmington, and Mr. and Mrs. Percy Whita- 
ker. Each of the "Wooten girls" came to St. Mary's, the last of them, 
Miss Anna, the first part of the present session. Miss Amoret was a 
student here in 1903. "Percy Whitaker" is one of the few "St. Mary's 
boys," and is numbered with those who have never ceased to be proud 
that they began their school training with Miss McKimmon. His last 
visit to St. Mary's was only a month or two ago when he introduced him- 
self to the Rector as one of "Miss Katie's boys." 



Smith-Higgs 

A wedding that was unusually beautiful and attractive was celebrated at 4 
o'clock on the afternoon of April 22d, at the Church of the Good Shepherd, when 
Miss Emily Gertrude Higgs, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Higgs, became the 
bride of Mr. Gilbert Egbert Smith, of New York. 

The church was thronged with the friends of the young couple and it presented a 
scene of beauty. The decorations were in exquisite taste and were artistically 
effected with calla and Easter lilies, with a background of palms and trailing 
smilax, the soft radiance from many candles increasing the beautiful effect. 
Preceding the entry of the bridal party Mr. Wade R. Brown rendered a number of 
beautiful selections. 

With the music of the wedding march from Lohengrin the bridal party entered, 
first coming the ushers, Messrs. Walter Smith and Whitmel Smith, of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., brothers of the groom; Messrs. Allen Higgs and James Higgs, brothers of 
the bride. 



28 The St. Mary s Muse. 

After these there entered the dame of honor, Mrs. Henry C. Walter, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, attired in a light-blue crepe, with white picture hat, and carrying a 
shower bouquet of La France roses. 

The bride entered the church with her father, Mr. James A. Higgs, who gave her 
away. She was gowned in white messaline satin with pearl trimmings and rose! 
point lace and carried a shower bouquet of lilies of the valley. She wore a pearl 
necklace, the gift of the groom. She was met at the altar by the groom with his 
best man, Mr. Burton Hoyle Smith, of Charlotte, and then the impressive Episcopal 
service was performed by the Rector of the church, Rev. I. McK. Pittinger, assisted 
by Rev. Walter Smith, of Charlotte, uncle of the groom. 

The bride and groom left immediately after the service for an extended wedding 
trip, and will be at home at Brooklyn, N. Y. The bride's traveling gown was a 
dark blue tailor-made suit with hat and gloves to match. 

The young people are well known and popular throughout the State, having 
many relatives and friends. The bride is a charming and attractive young woman 
of this city, her sweet personality and charm of manner winning for her hosts of 
friends and rendering her a social favorite. The groom, a native of North Carolina, 
and for a short time a student at the A. and M. College here, is now a successful 
young lawyer of New York, where he is also engaged in the realty business. Many 
handsome and lovely wedding gifts were tokens of the esteem and love of friends 
and relatives. 

Among the out-of-town friends and relatives here for the wedding was Mrs. 
H. L. Smith, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 



S k, i n n e r- P i t t-.p n p ? r. 

There was celebrated at noon, April 29th, in the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
a lovely wedding, when Miss Annie Louise Pittinger, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. 
I. McK. Pittinger, became the bride of Mr. James Leigh Skinner, of this city. 

The church was thronged with friends of the popular young couple, the gathering 
being one that marked the high esteem in which the young people are held. The 
church was not decorated in flowers, but the scene was a lovely one when there 
gathered at the chancel the bridal party, the white and gold altar hangings and 
the soft radiance from many candles lending attractiveness to the scene. 

The wedding music was charmingly rendered by Mrs. Frank T. Ward, who, 
before the entry of the bridal party, gave a number of beautiful selections. As 
the processional she played the march of Tannhauser, and as a recessional Mendels- 
sohn's wedding march, the music being greatly enjoyed. 

In the entry of the bridal party first came two of the ushers, Messrs. Theo. 
Webb, of Raleigh, and George Harrison, of Enfield. After these came the two 
bridesmaids, Miss Lily Skinner and Miss Rosa Skinner, sisters of the groom, who 
were attired in handsome tunic gowns of white crepe de chene with trimmings of 
heavy silk fringe. They carried sheaf bouquets of Easter lilies and their hats 
were of white leghorn with trimmings of green tulle and white hyacinths. After 
these came two ushers, Messrs. Albert Bauman, of Raleigh, and Robert M. Coburn, 
of Raleigh. Then entered the maid-of-honor, Miss Sarah Cheshire, who was charm- 
ingly gowned in yellow mercerized batiste with yellow lace hat, her bouquet being 
of white sweet peas. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



The bride entered the church with her brother, Mr. Paul N. Pittenger, and in 
;he marriage ceremony she was given away by her mother, the vows being given 
>y her father, Rev. I. McK. Pittenger, the Rector of the church. She was most 
handsomely attired in white messaline, over white taffeta, her dress trimmed with 
Applique of chiffon, rose embroidered, and wearing a duchesse lace bertha. Her 
wedding veil was caught with a spray of orange blossoms, held in place with three 
ivory ornaments which had descended to the bride from her great-grandmother. 
Her bouquet was of bride's roses. At the altar she was met by the groom, who 
entered with his best man, Mr. J. W. Hunter. 

Immediately after the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Skinner left on a wedding trip 
North, the bride's traveling suit being of black and white cloth, hat and gloves to 
match. 

The bride is one of Raleigh's most charming and most accomplished young 
women, whose rare personal qualities have made for her many friends and admirers. 
Possessing a sweet voice, her talents as a vocalist have given pleasure often in the 
'city. Mr. Skinner is a young business man of Raleigh, esteemed for both his 
personal qualities and his business aptitude, being engaged in the insurance and 
real estate business, as secretary and treasurer of Raleigh Insurance and Realty 
Company. The many wedding gifts, the exquisite array of which were admired 
at the home of the bride's parents, were tokens of the love and esteem of friends 
for the young couple. 

Jones-A'lackay. 

At half-after five o'clock yesterday afternoon in Christ Church there was a lovely 
wedding event, which was attended by a great throng of friends, the marriage being 
that of°Miss Margaret Devereux Mackay. of this city, and Mr. George Lyle Jones, 
of Franklin. 

The ceremony was impressively performed by the Rev. Milton A. Barber, the 
Rector of the parish, and the music was rendered by Mrs. James A. Briggs, a friend 
of the bride, who delighted all with several beautiful selections. 

Messrs. Albert Little, DeSaussure Mackay, and J. K. Wilson, of Raleigh, and 
Mr. Lenoir Gwyn, of Waynesville, acted as ushers. Mr. J. Kemp Doughton, of 
Winston-Salem, was the best man. 

Miss Katharine Josephine Mackay, the maid of honor, was the bride's only attend- 
| ant She was dressed in white French muslin trimmed in white satin and lace and 
carried pink sweet peas. 

The bride entered to the strains of Mendelssohn's wedding march, on the arm of 
her father, Mr. Joseph J. Mackay, who gave her away at the altar, where she was 
met by the groom. She was handsomely gowned in white messaline satin and 
duchesse point. She carried a shower bouquet of bride's roses, and wore the tradi- 
tional veil and wreath of orange blossoms. 

Immediately after the ceremony the young couple left for New York and other 
points of interest. After June 1st they will be at home at Franklin, N. C. 

The bride and groom are well known in Raleigh, where they have a large circle 
friends and relatives. The bride is one of the most cultured and attractive young 
women of the city, and her charming personality has made her many friends and 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



admirers. The groom, a University of North Carolina graduate, is a popular and 
able attorney of Franklin, a son of the late Judge George A. Jones, of Franklin, 
He made Raleigh his home, at one time being in the office of the Corporation 
Commisison. 

An informal reception was given to the friends of the bride and groom Tuesday 
night from nine until eleven o'clock, at the home of the bride on North Person! 
street. About forty or fifty friends were present, and the reception was a mosti 
enjoyable one. The guests greatly admired the many lovely gifts, tokens of the' 
esteem and regard of many friends. 



Whitaker-O'Brien. 

"Miss Nelle Francis O'Brien 

announces the marriage of her sister 

Anne 

to 

Mr. Percy du Ponceau Whitaker, 

on Saturday, the eighteenth of April, 

nineteen hundred and eight, 

at All Saints' Church, 

in the City of Atlanta." 

Enclosed cards state that Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker were at home after April 25th, 
at Brown Palace Hotel, Denver, Colorado. 

Mr. Whitaker is a North Carolinian, a son of the late Hon. Spier Whitaker, 
Judge of the Superior Court, and a grandson of the late J. De Berniere Hooper. 
He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina, and was afterwards in Cuba, 
where he was engaged in some important development enterprises. 



Davis-Wootter). 
Wilmington, N. C, April 29.— An after-Easter social event of pleasure and 
interest for a large number of friends was the marriage of Miss Amoret Wootten 
and Mr. William Arnold Davis in St. Paul's Episcopal Church, this evening at 
6 o'clock. The bride is an attractive young daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Edward 
Wootten, of Wilmington, and the groom a popular young clerk in the employ of 
the large cotton exporting house of Alexander Sprunt & Son. The prominence 
and popularity of the couple attracted a large number of friends to the church, 
and the wedding was one of the prettiest of the spring season in Wilmington. 

The bride was attended as maid-of-honor by her sister, Miss Anna Wootten, and 
the groom as best man by his friend, Mr. W. L. Moore. Pretty little Miss Rosalie 
Burbank was the flower girl, and Misses Hattie French, Margaret Nash, Mary 
Davis and Maria Maffitt were the bridesmaids. The ushers were Messrs. George 
Diebert, Hal Boatwright, Eugene LeGrand and Guy R. Davis. The ceremony was 
impressively performed according to the rites of the Episcopal Church by Rev. 
Edward Wootten, father of the bride, assisted by Rev. Alexander W. Seabrease, 
Rector of the Parish. A brief reception at the home of the bride followed the 
ceremony, after which Mr. and Mrs. Davis took their departure on the north-bound 
train for a bridal tour to the groom's former home in New York State. They 
will return in about six weeks and will be at home in this city, where both are 

very popular. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 



At. Bedtime. 



[Translated from the German by Sarah Stone Williams.] 
Lie still and listen, baby dear, 
How beautiful the angels are. 
Their faces are so wondrous bright 
That earth and heaven are rilled with light. 
Sweet fadeless flowers in golden hair 
And snow-white robes they ever wear. 
Their eyes, like yours, are blue and clear, 
Their smiles like sunshine, baby dear. 
With tireless wing in noiseless flight 
They flash through space by day and night. 

Be still and listen, little one, 
How light they float — like thistle down — 
Like snow from heaven, so pure and white, 
Like zephyrs on a summer night, 
Noiseless as grass in May-time springs, 
Quick as the flash of bue-birds' wings, 
Soft as the leaf drops from the tree, 
Bright as the moonbeams on the sea, 
Gentle as sleep on baby's eyes, 
The angels come from far-off skies 
To watch with looks so kind and mild 
All night above my precious child. 



— Hamilton, Ga m April 6, 1908. 

Dear Editorial Staff:— I noticed you published in your January number my "Grave-yard Rabbit," 
io I send you a little poem— 'At Bed-time"— which I translated from the German, and hope it may 
please the ".little folks." Yours sincerely, (Mrs.) Sarah Stone Williams. 



F^EAD !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pay* 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



XOETH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 



TO MAKE YOVK 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO SET THE BEST 



The 1908 Annual Muse. 

The Year Book of the Students of 
St. Mary's. 

Ready for delivery about May 25th. 
$2.00 per copy delivered. 



E DOBBlN-FERRi 

Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' EINE SHOES Wffi SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARCE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Cloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



FHE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH. N. C. 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
W. N. Jones. Vice-President. 
{ F. H. Bkiggs, Cashier 
J. B. Timbeelake, Ass't Cashier. 

\ All patrons treated with every courtesy. 

New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
'or rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 



FHOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Htoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, 
Surplus, • 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100,000.00 

100.000.00 
1,175.000.00 
1,500.000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of flue church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



Don't you hunt foh trouble; 

Jis' ten' to what you's got. 
It ain't no special credit 

Even if you fins a lot. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Read}'. 


" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 


ALL 'PHONES No 79. 






D. T. JOHNSON <£ SON, 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL,, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 






Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything: in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 


W. C. STRONACffS SONS CO. 




GKOCKHS 




Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 
made. Write for prices. 


216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 




KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 




AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 


KING'S GROCERY, 


Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


"The Little Store." 









THE CONSTANT ADVERTISER. 

'Tis the constant drop of water wears a hole in solid stone; 

'Tis the constant gnaw of Towser masticates the hardest bone; 

'Tis the constant wooing lover carries off the charming maid; 

And the constant advertiser is the one who gets the trade. — Ex. 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

o re o c re p? g 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIET OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisemes ts. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 P. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO.. Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry* Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



When the donkey saw the zebra. 
He began to switch his tail, 

"Well, I never !" Avas his comment, 
"Here's a mule that's been in jail." 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

Kinston, N. C, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

at j. l. o'qjjinn & co. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 

ROBT. SIMPSON, DTO E&K£Sffi «* 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 
All Sons of Building Supplies, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 

H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



TOO MUCH OF IT. 
T want to be an angel. That 

We heard a fat man say. 
'I'm growing weary of this fat, 

I would not live all weigh.'* 



-Philadelphia Press. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



BARRETT & THOMPSON, 

Architects and Engineers, 
raleigh, n. c. 



PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital $15,000 Surplus 850,000. Deposits over 
8750,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO , 

PRINTERS AN"D BINDERS. 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRe! 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SWINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 EayetteviJleSt. Raleigh, N. C. 



11. nil 



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Hon in these 



f, frogressift Music Dep.ctrffnet 



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V'-/'' : . ; . l * : '-.."■ : : : W ■:'.: ■ J;,-';-;-':,':-- '■: ■' 



flDa$, 1908 



Zhc 
St- flfoary's flfcuee 




Commencement flumbev 
■Raleigh, VI. a. 



f 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



9 



Subscription. One Year. 
Single Copies, s 

A Magazine published month. 
N. 0., in ihe interest of the studei. 
Muse Cliih. 

Address all communications and 

Correspondence from friends solicited 




der Ihe edi 



One Dollar. 

Fifteen Cents. 



chool, Raleigh, 
igemeut of in* 



options to 

THE ST. MAUY'H MUSE 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1H07-TJS. 
ir.;ia Stanton If aj.es. Editor-in-Chief. 

Eleanob Kaniivi.hi VVii 
Min.vij; L.EAK1-. 
i BaTTXE, SAllAri PKINCE THOMAS. 



EDITORIAL. 



The quid Lenten season 
renewed effort in our work, 
struggle for self-mastery, 
many of us really know on 




ith it comes the thought of 

>f self-examination and the 

ve to know ourselves. Bow 

ire ? How often do we think 



about ourselves, about our own faults and failings, instead of about 
other people's ? This is the time for us to try to correct our own faults, 
and by so doing we can better help others to correct theirs. 



Thinking. 



Have we ever realized how little we really think? . We do our work, 
and P'et our lessons in a sort of mechanical way because we baa 
think it is our duty. Yve translate our Latin. Fa 
■k, whichever il may be, merely to get it into wk 

I think about il whe n we ar c doin<r. it, or do wj ' 
of the w-trd- : j^SSSg^^'i that we write, 

^n «-et. them writtei 






Sai.i.ih Haywood Battle 
Katharine Henderson 



THE "MUSE BOARD." LH07-8. 

Nell R. Wilson 
Georgia s. Hales 
Eva Rogerson 



Minnie Leahy 
Sai; ah p. Thomas 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 

N 

Vol. XII. May, 190S. No. & t 



Commencement Exercises. 



Sunday, May Twenty-Fourth. 

11 a. m. Commencement Sermon in the Chapel. 

Her. Harris Mallinckrodt, of St. Peter's Church, Charlotte. 

Monday, May Twenty-Fifth. 

4:30 p. m. Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Studio. 

8:30 p. m. Expression Recital in the Auditorium. 

Tuesday, May Twenty-Sixth. 

2:30 p. m. Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

4 p. m. Annual Alumnae Meeting in the Art Studio. 

S : 30 p. m. Rector's Reception in the School Parlor. 

Wednesday, May Twenty-Seventh. 

11 a. m. Commencement Address in the Auditorium. 

Hon. R. H. Battle, LL.D., of Raleigh. 

4:30 p. m. Annual Meeting of the Trustees in the Library. 

8:30 p. m. Annual Concert of the Music Department in the Auditorium. 

Thursday, May Twenty-Eighth. 

10:30 a. m. Graduating Exercises. 

Class Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Closing Exercises in the Chapel. 



IDA JEAN ROGERSON. 



"Mamma, don't let her harness my kitty ; donft let her drive my kit- 
ty!" The little voice was pitiful in the extreme, but her mother for 
once was not in earshot. It was a hot summer morning, but the burning 
sun shone down unheeded on the curly head of the little figure standing 
there miserably. Her little black kitten, like a round ball of black fur, 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



was rolling over in the cool grass slapping playfully with his white paw 
at the improvised harness which Camille, for some unknown cruel rea- 
son, was endeavoring to fasten upon him. 

"Camille, you shan't drive my kitty," the little voice went on. "Yon 
just want to kill him, you know you do." But the older girl pushed 
her roughly aside. Annette dropped down upon the ground and buried 
her face in Fuzzy's soft coat. "Kitty, don't let her drive you; kitty, 
it's so hot." Fuzzy only patted a hanging curl lovingly, while Annette'* 
tears fell uncomfortably on his black fur. 

''Get up, Annette," broke in Camille, "don't be a baby. Come on 
Fuzzy." She jerked him up roughly, almost choking him with the 
tight string tied around his neck. "Get up there," as she touched him 
with a long peach switch. Annette dropped down and buried her face 
in the grass sobbing heart-brokenly. 

The little kitten, not used to this treatment, darted forward like a 
black streak, but was immediately jerked back on his haunches. Again 
he was driven forward. Twice he was raced around the garden, and 
yet a third time, pursued by shrill cries of cruel delight. His little red 
tongue was hanging out now and his pace was becoming slower and 
slower. He heard a distressed voice calling to him, "Kitty, Kitty." 
He tried to turn towards her, but was jerked back, roughly. Again he 
was turned for his fourth trip, but suddenly, with an appealing look at 
his little mistress, and a piteous "meow" he dropped exhausted, pant- 
ing for breath, in the hot sun. 

"Oh, you've killed him. Mamma, she's killed my kitty," cried An- 
nette, turning on Camille in a frenzy of rage. "I hate you, I hate you, 
I hate you." 

Camille watched her rather sullenly, as she lifted the limp little body 
and laid it on the shady porch. "Kitty, are you going to die ?" asked 
the little girl piteously, "Kitty, are you going to die ?" The little red 
tongue was hanging limply between the white teeth, and the faint beating 
of the little heart was the only response. "Kitty, are you so hot ? I'll 
fan you, Kitty, only please don't die." She reached for a large palm- 
leaf lying in the porch chair. Fuzzy turned his beautiful yellow eyes 
towards his little mistress. They seemed to be growing glassy. "Kitty, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



please drink some water/' she wailed, "Kitty, please don't die. I 
couldn't help it, Fuzzy. I tried to make her stop. Oh, Kitty, darling, 
please don't die." There was wealth of appeal in the beseeching voice, 
but Fuzzy paid no heed. He seemed not to hear. 

For an hour she worked faithfully, fanning him, begging him not to 
die, and bringing fresh water that he only looked at. 

At last, tired out, she buried her face in the soft black fur, sobbing 
bitterly: "Kitty, I know you are going to die. I know you are going 
to die!" 

With a very faint little "meow" Fuzzy reached out his little white 
paw and patted the wet cheek very gently. With a cry of joy she 
caught him in her arms. "You are going to stay with me? You are 
not going to die, are you, kitty, darling ?" 

A soft "purr" against her cheek was her only answer. 



Why Poppies are Red. 



MINNIE TAMPLET HAZARD. 



There was a time many and many a year ago when all poppies were 
white. How some of them came to be yellow no one knows; but this 
little story will tell you why we have scarlet poppies. 

King Kenelm ruled over a country far away by the rising sun. A 
beautiful land it was, where countless flowers bloomed. All the people 
there were beautiful and fairies made their homes in the woodlands. 
The king and his young wife, with her hair of gold and eyes of blue, 
were very happy in their magnificent palace; but they had no little 
child, although they had long wanted one. After a time, however, there 
was sent to Kenelm and his queen a tiny girl — a beautiful child with 
curls of a brighter gold than even those of her mother, and eyes of a 
deeper blue. And they named her "Ethelind," which means "beautiful." 

Now, you know, when any new mortal came to that lovely land near 
the rising sun, the fairies always met to decide whether or not the little 
stranger were beautiful enough for them to keep in the kingdom, for no 

2 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



ugly one was allowed in that lovely country. So one night when the 
moonlight fell upon the forest floor through leafy branches, the fairies 
took the little sleeping Ethelind from her cradle of gold to the wood- 
lands and laid her gently on a bank of moss. As they gazed upon hei 
they wondered at her beauty. By fairy fingers the tiny white lids were 
opened, disclosing the deep blue eyes. At length they pronounced the 
princess the most beautiful child they had ever seen and declared thai 
her loveliness outshone even that of Poppilia, the fairy queen of the 
snow-white poppies. It angered Poppilia to hear it said that she was 
less beautiful than a mortal, for she was both proud and vain ; but 
when she cried out that the fairies were not truthful, those little beings 
only murmured again: a ^N"ay ? nay, Ethelind is the loveliest of mortals 
and more beautiful than even thee, the queen of the poppies." Then 
the proud fairy would have struck the sleeping child with her gauzy 
wings, but the others swiftly bore the princess back to her father's palace. 

That very night Poppilia declared that never might the beautiful 
Ethelind play with her snow-white poppies ; and that, if ever she plucked 
one of the blossoms, harm would befall her. Her sister fairies knew 
how powerful was the poppy queen, and besought her to be less cruel; 
but Poppilia was angry and would not be kind. 

So word was borne to King Kenelm from Fairyland of the threat 
of the popjDy-queen. There was much sorrow at the palace, for the fields 
near by where the little princess liked to play were full of many 
flowers ; and, although the king sought to destroy all the poppies, some 
might grow unnoticed by the side of the white daisies and lilies. How- 
ever, Ethelind was carefully guarded and told that she must never touch 
a poppy. And all went well until she wandered one day alone farther 
than usual from the palace. Evening came, but the princess did not 
return; and the king and queen, mindful of the one great danger, set 
out to seek her. They hunted long, but saw no sign of Ethelind until 
they reached the banks of a pretty stream wandering through the 
meadow. Floating on the water was a poppy, its white petals bruised 
and torn ; and near it on the tiny wavelet lay a bit of the white silk of 
Ethelind's gown. Then they knew that Poppilia had carried her away, 
and they wept many tears. 



The St. Mary's Muse. § 

Now the other fairies, when they learned what had happened, sent 
one of their number to Kenelni to tell him that, while they themselves 
could not bring the princess back, they would guide to her any mortal 
who was brave enough to seek her rescue. There was a noble youth, 
Hubert by name, in that land near the rising sun, who loved Ethelind 
and was loved by her. So it happened that he with a fairy as his guide 
went forth to hud the beautiful girl. 

His little companion led him to the very stream where the bruised 
poppy had been found, and touched the waters with her wand. They 
parted and she and Hubert entered a dark, rocky cavern beneath. 
When, at last, they came forth into the light, they saw towering in the 
distance a mighty portal of silver which gleamed white in the rays of 
the sun. Thus far the fairy had said no word, but now, pointing to the 
shining gateway, she spoke: "Yonder is the entrance to Poppyland, 
where Ethelind is in keeping. Nearby the portal is a fierce dragon, 
which you must slay. If you are successful the silver gates will open 
at your touch and you can enter within. Naught will be visible save 
poppies, poppies, poppies; and their fragrance will make your lids 
heavy with slumber. But though the dragon may have wounded you, 
dare not to close your eyes. The test is that you roam for five days in 
that field of poppies and sleep not, This done, Poppilia, the queen, 
will have lost her power over mortals, and Ethelind, who lies hidden, 
will come forth to thee. I may not enter the silver portals now, so 
farewell." 

The way was long to the shining entrance, and Hubert was weary 
when he reached the dragon ; but he fought bravely with his sword, and 
soon the monster lay injured and dying. Then the silver bars parted 
at his touch and he found himself in the land of poppies. The pretty 
blossoms seemed to bow to him as they swayed in the breeze, but there 
was a sadness in their wee flower faces ; for many a bloom had a crim- 
son stain on one of its petals. Hubert wondered, for he had never be- 
fore seen any save snow-white poppies out in the world of mortals. 
Soon a greater weariness came over him. Great pain it was not to close 
his eyes in slumber; but, just as his strength was almost failing and he 
stumbled as he wandered about, the evening of the fifth day passed ; and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



suddenly a new, joyous strength came to him, driving away all wear 
ness. While he stood waiting he heard his name called softly an 
turned to see Ethelind standing- where just a moment before had bee' 
one of the unstained poppies. The flower had disappeared; but th 
princess went to Hubert, beautiful as of old, her white gown brushin ; 
the blossoms as she passed. 

In the midst of the poppy field the lovers met and told each other a 
that had happened since they had last parted in their home-land net 
the rising sun. It seemed that Ethelind, captivated by the beauty of 
large white poppy in the meadow near the stream, had plucked it, fol 
getting the warning of the fairies. Straightway it was torn from he 
grasp. ThB waters rose up and drew her under, and she felt hersel 
hurried along by unseen hands. When the dark passageway was lei 
behind, she saw that two ugly fairies accompanied her; and she wa 
borne by them toward the same white gateway through which Hubeij 
had entered the land of poppies. The dragon lashed with his tail th| 
slender, delicate arms of Ethelind as she passed him, causing the bloo 
to flow. The princess was made to roam to and fro over the poppy field' 
one drop of crimson blood happening to fall on every blossom that shf 
passed. At length, faint with weariness and drowsy with the perfum 
of the flowers, she cried out in her pain; and to silence her the wicker, 
fairies turned her into a poppy — but one without a blood stain. 

As Ethelind finished speaking Hubert's little fairy guide appeared 
"Fair princess," murmured the tiny creature, "do what you will wit]' 
the queen of the poppies. She has been conquered and must obey you ' 
commands." Ethelind was silent for a moment, but she took in he: 
hand one of the stained poppies. "Poor little blossom," she softK 
said, "you were snow white and my blood has made a dash of crimsoi 
on your petals." Then to the fairy she answered: "I would not harn 
Poppilia, but this she must do. The crimson stains on these flowers cai 
not be taken away ; and so she must go to the far land of winter sunsetsj 
and gather of their beautiful crimson shades with which to paint all thj 
petals of her poppies which bear my blood. No one of these stainee 
flowers must she send out into the world of mortals until she has dontj 
as I have bidden." After this was said Ethelind, her arms full of snow' 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



ivhite poppies which no longer could harm her, went with Hubert, her 
[over, forth from that drowsy realm to her own happy land near the 
rising sun. 

And so we see why so many poppies are crimson. For before she 
sends them out into the world Poppilia still touches the petals of those 
blood-stained blossoms with scarlet from the far country of winter 
sunsets. 



The F^st Baseman. 



HELEN BLAIR DANIEL. 



The girl sat on the arm of the sofa, looking out into the street, with 
big troubled eyes. Could it be true that Bob Stevenson was a coward ; 
great big, confident Bob? But Carstairs had said so, and Wainright, 
Bob's chum and room-mate, had not denied it. And more than one of 
the 'Varsity men had told her how he lost the last game, and how he 
had failed so many times before that. How could this be Bob Steven- 
son ? It was not at all like the old Bob, steady, strong and fearless. 
Could it be that the ball knocking him in the head had cowed him? 
No, no she would not even think of such a thing, until she herself had 
seen Stevenson. Just then Wainright, passing the window, saw her 
and stopped a moment, "Bob asked me to stop by and tell you that he 
couldn't get around to-day, got whacked in the head again yesterday, 
and as we've got to play him to-morrow, the cap's keeping him in his 
room ; won't you wish us luck ? Thanks ; we'll do our best. Good 
bye." 

So Bob was even afraid to come to her ; oh, why should she care so 
much ; what did it matter to her what the other fellows thought about 
him ; he couldn't be, that was all, he just couldn't be a coward. Well, 
she would see anyhow to-morrow ; yes, she would let that game decide. 
Her reverie was rudely disturbed by a door banging, and a cheery voice 
calling, "Sis, Sis, oh you are in here, are you ; well, would you let your 
big brother have the honor of escorting you to a baseball game to- 
morrow ?" 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

"Indeed I will Billy, and — and will you get seats near first base V\ 
With a knowing wink at the marble statue in the corner Billy answered, 
"Sure, anything to oblige a lady." 

The hot sun beat down upon the jolly, gay crowds on the grand- 
stands, and upon the baseball diamond, hard and dusty. The Cornell 
team came running out and the little crowd of Ithacan rooters on the 
north stand jumped up and yelled and yelled yet again for their sturdy 
band of warriors. Pennsylvanians across the field gave a mighty, wel- 
coming cheer to their opponents, and settled down to wait for their own 
men. Suddenly the south stand rose up in one solid mass and cheered 
and cheered to the echo the Red and Blue team trotting across the 
field. The cheering stopped long enough for Cornell to give a snappy 
yell for their enemies, and then Pennsylvania's cohorts swung into that 
matchless song of songs, "Hail Pennsylvania." 

A little snappy practice and then the umpire's "Play Ball" quieted 
the crowds and turned all attention to the game. On the south stand, a 
girl in a big blue suit, and holding a red and blue pennant, watched 
with intent eyes the big first baseman, and a little flash of pity crossed 
her face as she noticed the bandage around his head, and the discouraged 
droop of his shoulders. No, he didn't look exactly afraid, only tired. 
Then Billy was speaking, "Do you know, Sis, that unless Steve makes 
good in this game he is to lose his place; how he could have slumped 
so is more than I can understand." And as she answered not a word 
he too turned his attention to the game. Cornell had the advantage, 
that was evident, but still Pennsylvania's fighting chance was not gone, 
and may be the team could pull up yet. One never can quite tell what 
strange tricks Old Mother Fate is up to. One inning was over and 
Cornell had scored a run, and Pennsylvania's first baseman was plainly 
rattled. The second inning, and Pennsylvania was holding her own. 
The third inning and Cornell had not scored again. The fourth inning 
and another run was tallied for Ithaca ; yes, it was the first baseman's 
fault. The girl looked beseechingly at her brother, but Billy only shook 
his head and said, "Wait." The fifth inning; would Pennsylvania 
never make a run ? Oh ! had Stevenson dodged that ball ? The sixth 
inning — yes, he was afraid of that ball coming straight at him and 



The St. Maeys Muse. 



oh, why did he have to miss it? The Red and Blue Captain called 
cheerily to him, "It's all right, Steve, accidents will happen." How 
she did like that captain. Her pennant was drooping now, and even 
Billy's wild yelling had ceased. The seventh inning — Cornell 3, Penn- 
sylvania — and Stevenson was much to blame. Billy turned to his 
sister with indignant anger, "Why under the sun don't they take Steven- 
son out, he's rattled to death, and losing us the game ?" The girl gave 
a little despairing sigh, and gazed out across the field. Yes, there was 
no doubt about it, he was a coward. With an effort she brought her- 
self back to watch the game, and the dirty, tired men. Stevenson was 
going to the bat, and yes, he was the last man of the inning. "All 
right, Steve, whack 'em one, now." "Go it, old fellow, don't let it be 
a whitewash," many voices called advice, and then the captain, "Steady, 
boy, steady, don't get rattled, you'll do all right; steady, there." And 
the man at the bat, hot, tired, hopeless, his brain just repeating over and 
over in sickening rhythm, "Coward, failure; coward, failure." And 
the girl on the grandstand— he gritted his teeth, pushed the bandage 
from his eyes, gripped the bat, and steadied by his captain's voice, and 
the blue-eyed presence on the south stand, stood ready. The umpire's 
singsong voice calling, "Strike one, strike two," then a tense stiffening 
on the south stand, a girl her eyes brilliant with excitement, a sharp 
crack of the ball against the bat, and a Eed and Blue figure racing for 
home. Safe around first, second safely made, and Stevenson was rac- 
ing on to third. Just a few feet from third he lurched and half fell, 
but with an extra effort he pulled himself up and made the base in a 
limping run. Then, "Slide, Steve, slide, for heaven's sake slide," in 
agonized chorus from the tense Pennsylvanian crowds, and a Eed and 
Blue clad figure shot out and slid in a cloud of dust for home. Hands 
stretched out and body stiffened he shot through the hot dust for that 
illusive white plate, H-O-M-E. "Safe," sang out the umpire, and the 
south stand rose in a mighty mass, yelling wildly, and together the ex- 
cited crowds surged down into the field. The Pennsy captain 
ran quickly to the inert figure, limp on home. A doctor pushed his 
way into the crowd around Stevenson, dipped a sponge into the pail of 
water and sopped the hot, dusty face, resting against the captain's knee. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Slowly the eyes opened and with a dazed expression Bob asked in a 
whisper, "Did I V "Roy, you're all to the good ; I knew you had it in 
you; great, you did just great"; it was the captain's steady voice; and 
as the full realization that he had really scored came over Stevenson he 
struggled to his feet, and stood swaying a second before he was hoisted 
on the shoulders of the waiting, jubilant men. In a flash, before he 
was borne in triumphant procession to the gym., he saw on the grand- 
stand a girl, bright-eyed and radiant, frantically waving a red and 
blue pennant. 

Down in the field Cornell's men were wild with joy at the victory 
over so hated an enemy, yet as they turned toward the gymnasium they 
stopped and bunched together, gave one ringing cheer for Pennsylvania, 
and Stevenson. That last run made by Pennsylvania's first baseman 
would be remembered forever in the annals of Pennsylvania's achieve- 
ments, and the bitter sting of defeat was gone, in the joy over that 
noble slide for home. And on the south stand a girl sobbed, sobbed with 
relief and joy, and her brother, understanding, tenderly touching her 
on the arm, said, "Sis, I'll take you on home, and then get Steve around 
for supper; that is if the fellows can spare him." 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Alice L. Hines, Editor. 



Walter Howe in Dramatic Impersonation. 

Mr. Walter Howe gave a recital Monday night, May the fourth, in 
the auditorium. 

Mr. Howe has been on the stage for about thirty years and has 
played in the same company with Irving and Mansfield. Monday morn- 
ing he very kindly spoke to us in the school room. It was more than a 
series of simple recitations and selections that he gave, they were real 
dramatic impersonations. In the "Grave Scene" from Hamlet he was 
particularly fine, especially in his changes in tone of voice and facial 
expression from the gruff old grave diggers to Hamlet and his friend, 
the very highest type of cultured and refined gentlemen. The recital 




THE INTER-SOCIETY DEBATERS. 



Eleaxoii R. Wilson 
Julia L. McI^tyke 



MAJtY C. Slll"Foi:l> 
ELLEN K. DUVALL 



The St. Mary's Muse. H 



at night was enjoyed just as much as the one in the morning. Mr. 
Howe was very good in all his impersonations, but especially so in the 
scene from "The Rivals" ; or, at least, that was the one that appealed to 
us most, as it shows the difference between the domineering English 
parent and our own indulgent parent. What perhaps pleased the ma- 
jority of us most were Mr. Howe's anecdotes and experiences of stage 
life. Several of us met Mr. Howe afterward, and the unanimous 
opinion was that we were unable to decide which was the more charm- 
ing, "Mr. Howe, the speaker," or "Mr. Howe, the gentleman." 

J. DuB, 
Soiree Musicale. 
A most enjoyable musical treat was given in the Auditorium Tuesday 
evening, May fifth, when the cantata, "A Garden of Flowers," by 
Denza, was presented. The cantata is for female voices and was under 
the direction of our voice teacher, Mrs. Vincent. We have had several 
opportunities of hearing good chorus work given in Raleigh by a chorus 
necessarily made up very largely of uncultivated voices, but the splendid 
shading and vocal skill displayed in "A Garden of Flowers" can only be 
produced by cultivated voices that have been well placed and trained 
in addition to skillful ensemble drill. 

PART I. 

(a) Obstination Fontenailles. 

(b) Roses after Rain Lehman. 

FRANCES BROADFOOT. 

Ariosa Belies. 

JENNIE BELLE TURNER. 

Sweetheart Morris. 

MARGUERITE HALBIN. 

Violin Obligate 

EMILY ROSE KNOX. 

(a) Serenade Neidiinger. 

(b) To Spring Gounod. 

JOSEPHINE GILMER. 

Roses Everywhere Denza. 

MILDRED BORDEN. 

With the Stream Tours. 

JOSEPHINE GILMER, MARTHA FRANCIS. 

Sing On Benza - 

MARTHA FRANCIS. 
3 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



PART II. 

A Cantata Denza. 

THE GARDEN OF FLOWERS. 

The Moon Chokus. 

The Lark and the Nightingale Josephine Gilmer, Jennie Belle Tuknee. 

White Butterfly Misses Hunter, Halbin, Gkimsley. 

Lovely Rosebuds Frances Broadfoot. 

Summer Breezes Chorus. 

The Bees Chorus and Miss Borden. 

A Happy Streamlet Josephine Gilmer. 

Good-Night Misses Francis, Grimsley, Borden, Turner. 

Garden of Flowers Chorus. 

Those in the chorus were Misses Borden, Broadfoot, Campbell, Cavell, Francis, 
Frazer, Gilmer, Grimsley, Hunter, Haughton, Hardy, Halbin, Hardin, Kintner, Lee, 
LeCron, Little, Nelson, Newbold, Pou, Parker, Sandford, Turner, Williams. 

X. Y. Z. 
Visit of Mr. Walker. 

On Tuesday, May 5th, the school had as usual assembled in the 
chapel for evening prayer, when, quite unexpectedly to most of us, we 
had the privilege of being addressed by Mr. 1ST. P. Walker, a mission- 
ary to China and a professor in St. John's College, Shanghai. He 
had arrived after the chapel service began, but, nevertheless, consented 
to talk to us. What was said may be summed up thus: A brief state- 
ment of China's need of Christianity; a demonstration of how great 
is the opportunity now opening in that country to the workers of the 
Church ; and, lastly, an appeal for our cooperation in the great work 
of christianizing China. Mr. Walker spoke simply but forcefully, 
arousing the sympathies of all who heard him. 

That evening we were unable to meet him, as we could claim no 
more of his time, but the pleasure was afforded us Thursday night 
after study-hall. Mr. AValker very kindly came up to the school for 
the purpose of meeting our girls, and the result was an informal talk 
in the parlor. Questions concerning China were asked and readily 
answered, and much information was given us voluntarily. We 
learned, and the knowledge was pleasing to us, that the old custom of 
foot binding is being less and less observed, the tendency being to go 
to the other extreme, as the Chinese ladies now prefer large feet. It 



The St. Maey's Muse. 13 

is, of course, to be desired that they leave Nature altogether unassisted 
in this particular, but the latter preference is far the more desirable 
of the two. Shanghai, too, has her St. Mary's (Hall). It adjoins St, 
John's School for boys, but a great wall is placed between the build- 
ings ; although, as Mr. Walker significantly remarked, it is to be noticed 
that one of the bricks has recently been removed. We were further- 
more told of the peculiar method of Chinese burial, of the little kitchen 
gods, and of many other things in connection with those interesting 
people. At length the bell sounded the summons for separation; but 
we were not ready in our obedience, and it was some little time before 
we parted from our interesting friend. And, even then, thoughts of 
China followed some of Mr. Walker's hearers in their dreams. 

Many pleasures in the way of entertainment have been afforded in 
this week and Mr. Walker's visit is to be counted among the number. 
By it we have been filled with a desire to forward the work of foreign 
missions; and have, at the same time, added somewhat to our rather 
limited knowledge of far-away China. M. T. H. 

Annual Service of the Junior Auxiliary. 

On Wednesday evening, May 6th, the Junior Auxiliary of the Dio- 
cese of North Carolina held its annual service in our Chapel. The 
usually vacant seats were crowded with guests from different sections 
of the State, many of them representatives of the Auxiliary at the 
Diocesan Convention assembled in this city. The service was very 
interesting, and the music was hearty, the missionary hymns being 
sung with zest by all present. The three visiting ministers who took 
part in the service were Rev. Mr. Bost of Durham, Rev. Mr. Mallinck- 
rodt and Rev. Mr. Osborne, both of Charlotte. 

We were addressed by Mr. Bost and Mr. Mallinckrodt, both of whom 
gave earnest talks on missions. Mr. Bost spoke of the opportunity 
there is for each one of us, however humble he may be, to work in 
some way for the furtherance of the Gospel. Mr. Mallinckrodt, in a 
forceful, energetic manner, told us about the wonderful accomplish- 
ments of our church in the mission field throughout the world ; then he 
pointed out to us the three means by which we can help on missionary 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



work — money, prayer and work, represented by the three gifts of the 
Wise Men to Christ — gold, frankincense and myrrh. These two ad- 
dresses were most interesting and were greatly enjoyed by the congre- 
gation. We regret that Mr. Osborne did not talk to us also, and that 
he was unable to be present and deliver the sermon at the morning ser- 
vice on the following Sunday. 

St. Mary's was proud and glad to have the representatives of the 
Junior Auxiliary hold service in her Chapel, and she extends to them 
a cordial invitation to assemble again next year within her walls. 

P. E. H. 
Trinity Glee Club. 

One of the most delightful entertainments that St. Mary's has yet 
enjoyed in her new Auditorium was the matinee given by the Trinity 
Glee Club on Wednesday, May 6th, 1908, under the auspices of the 
Muse Club. 

The Glee Club is composed of about twenty-five young men, whose 
voices blend nicely, and in their rendition of the various difficult 
numbers, show the result of good and careful training. 

The music was pretty and very catchy, just the kind that vans the 
hearts of the older people, as well as the sentimental young school girl, 
a fact proven by the hearty applause received by the singers whenever 
they made their appearance on the stage. The Glee Club was assisted 
in its concert by Miss Pearl Brinson, who possesses a rich soprano 
voice, and whose singing captivated the entire audience. 

Mrs. W. W. Card's readings, too, were thoroughly enjoyed. 

Miss Elise Minis, who was accompanist, displayed much talent and 
study. 

Mr. Gilmer Korner deserves special mention. He is a young vio- 
linist of very promising ability, and he plays with much feeling and 
ease, and won a warm place in the hearts of hearers by his "Simple 
Aveu" and "La Cinquaintaine" and "Cavatina." We must mention the 
String Duo, Messrs. Hawks and Wyche, and the two Quartets, which 
were very fine, and especially the "Green Lemon Quartet," who were 
quite the hit of the afternoon, and who proved by their two songs that 
they are "not as green as they look." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



We hope the Glee Club will make us another visit before very long, 
and we can assure them of a very warm reception by St. Mary's and 
her daughters. A - L - G ' 

"A Dress Rehearsal." 

One of the most pleasant features of St. Mary's is the different little 
plays and entertainments, given from time to time, and never has 
there been one that was more thoroughly enjoyed than the Operetta, "A 
Dress Rehearsal," given Saturday evening, May 9th, by St. Etheldreda's 
Chapter. 

The scene is laid in a boarding school- for girls, of which Miss 
Jones is Principal, this part being taken by Miss Josephine Gilmer, 
who was splendid as the dignified Miss Jones, always ready for any in- 
| structive amusement for the girls, but ever opposed to anything boister- 
ous or ridiculous. 

The young ladies, led by Miss Fibbs, induce Miss Jones to let them 
a-ive a play, supposedly one of Shakespeare's Charades, but which 
proves to be only a burlesque written by Miss Fibbs's brother. 

It was too funny, the different predicaments into which the girls 
were always getting, and the manner in which they always succeeded 
in calming Miss Jones. 

Miss Francis was at her best, and later as "Cinderella" in the 
Burlesque, she was quite attractive. Her many "puns" brought forth 

hearty applause. 

No one could have acted the part of Mademoiselle Epinard more 
acceptably than did Miss Borden. Her little song, "Vat is Love," was 

very fine. 

Miss Broadfoot, "who is quite a star," was delightful, indeed, as 

Mrs. Jarvey, Elocution Mistress. 

Miss Elizabeth Smith made a handsome prince, "who didn't know 
how to make love," and was assisted by Miss Sanford, who took the 
part of Sophronisba Spivins, and was an excellent love-maker. 

Miss Ottley made a decided hit as Sarah Ann, The Greedy Girl, 
as did the attractive Miss DuBose, who was exceedingly fine as Miss 
Prudence Pinchback, The Visitor. 

Miss Halbin was beautiful as the Fairy Godmother, and the two 



16 The St. Mart's Muse. 

Spiteful Sisters (Misses Kintner and Brown), and Humpie, The Tat- 
tler (Miss Rembert), and The Servant (Miss Benedict), were all good. 
In short it was an "All Star Cast," and they reflected much credit 
on both themselves and Miss Cribbs, who so kindly aided them in their 
last rehearsals. 

The Seventh Inter-Society Debate. 

On the night of May the thirteenth, for the first time, our annual 
Inter-Society Debate was held in the auditorium. The subject was, 
"Resolved, That Robert E. Lee did more for the Confederacy than did 
Jefferson Davis," and to carry out the spirit of this subject the stage 
was prettily decorated with Confederate flags, large and small, to- 
gether with plants and flowers. 

A few minutes before the appointed time the girls from the two socie- 
ties filed in, the Sigma Lambdas taking their places on the left, the 
Epsilon Alpha Pis on the right hand side, while the seats in the centre 
were left for the visitors whom prudence advised to take the middle 
ground rather than risk their safety in one of the partisan localities. 
The judges, Rev. A. B. Hunter, Dr. W. A. Syme, and Prof. L. D. Wat- 
son, sat together on one of the front seats in the central row, and, during 
the debate, many an anxious glance was cast in their direction. Then, 
at a quarter past eight the presidents of the Sigma Lambda and Epsilon 
Alpha Pi societies appeared on the stage with the four debaters, Eleanor 
R. Wilson and Mary C. Shuford, for the Sigma Lambda, and Ellen 
K Duvall and Julia L. Mclntyre, for the Epsilon Alpha Pi society. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, the president of the Epsilon Alpha Pi, presided, 
with Marguerite Thompson, the president of the Sigma Lambda, at her 
side. The meeting was called to order by the president and everyone 
joined in singing "Dixie." The president then announced the subject 
of the deoate, and Miss Wilson, the first speaker on the affirmative, rose 
to read her paper. The papers were splendidly written and well de- 
livered, and, as the subject was one which all could appreciate and 
enjoy, there was no lack of interest on the part of the listeners. After 
the last paper had been read, the last retort made, the judges retired to 
make their decision, and during their absence, we rose to sing the 
song so dear to us all, "Alma Mater." The song over, we waited pa- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



tiently for the judges' return, and, in the course of time, our patience 
was rewarded. Mr. Hunter, who had been chosen as spokesman by his 
colleagues, relieved our anxiety by announcing the judges' decision in 
favor of the negative, and while, of course, this meant a victory for the 
Epsilon Alpha Pis, yet we felt that not one of the debaters could have 
done better, but that each deserved the highest praise for .her share in 
giving us such a helpful and interesting evening. E. T. W. 



School Notes. 



There were quite a number of visitors here for Easter. 

Mary Spruill of '07, visited her friends in Senior Hall. 

Cornie Fairley and Caroline Parker were both lucky in having 
their brothers here. Caroline had another visitor also, Miss Maria 
Maffitt, of Wilmington. 

Delamar Burbank's sisters, Misses Daisy and Rosalie, were in Ra- 
leigh for a few days and spent a great part of their time here. 

Laura Meares' sister, Exum, came to be with her Easter, and 
they spent Easter in the city with Mrs. Adickes. 

Margaret Johnson's father and brother spent Easter with her. 

Annie Wells, of Columbia, S. C, spent Easter here visiting her 
sister Mary, and her many friends of last year. 

Miss Cribbs went to Charlotte on Easter Monday to the Kappa 
Delta Convention, and while there was the guest of Mrs. Taliaferro. 

Rebe Shields's aunt, Miss Lena Smith, spent some time visiting in 
Raleigh, and while here she was a frequent visitor at the school. She 
is an old St. Mary's girl, as she was here during the rectorship of Mr. 
Aldert Smedes in 1875. Rebe was doubly lucky, for her mother, who 
was also a St. Mary's girl, came to the convention. 

Bonnie Broadfoot's uncle, Mr. Henry Bryan, of New Bern, K 0., 
was in Raleigh for several days and made several visits to the school. 

Mrs. John K. Ottley, of Atlanta, Ga., stopped in Raleigh on her 
way to New York, for several days, to be with her daughter, Passie 
May. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Nancy Fairley and Mossie Long, '05, of Rockingham, visited 
friends in Raleigh and were frequent visitors at the school during 1 
their visit. INfancy has two sisters at school here now, Glen and Katha- 
rine. 

Frankie Self's father came up and spent several days in Raleigh 
to be with her. 

Mrs. Lewis Bourne spent some time in Raleigh and was a frequent 
visitor at the school to see Mary. 

Susan Bynum, '07, of Lincolnton, ]\ T . C, and Mary Henderson, '03, 
of Salisbury, visited their many friends at the school for several 
days. 

Sadie Thomas' sister, Florence, '03, spent the night here on her way 
to visit in Edenton. 

Mr. Lay and Miss McKimmon went to Durham on May third to the 
consecration of St. Joseph's Church, which was given by Mr. W. A. 
Erwin as a memorial to his mother and father. It is a stone church, 
a miniature of Christ Church in Raleigh, without the steeple. Mar- 
garet and Bessie Erwin went home to be present at the consecration of 
the church. 

Mr. Hunter, rector of St, Augustine, held service in the chapel dur- 
ing Mr. Lay's absense. 

Lila Justice's father and her cousin, Mr. Will Pless, were in Raleigh 
to see her during the month. 

Mrs. W. R. Everett, of Rockingham, came up to see her daughter 
and also to be here during the convention of the King's Daughters. 

A number of the girls were lucky in having relatives and friends 
come to the convention of the Diocese of Worth Carolina. 

Sallie Haywood Battles mother came, Maud Bunn's sister, Blair 
Rawlings' mother, Caroline Parker's sister, Cornie Fairley's mother, 
father and sister; Bessie and Margaret Erwin's father, Margaret 
Haughton's mother, and Sadie Thomas' father. 



c- l - *• ~ *-».,^ Vo=M- = = One Dollar. 

Subscription, One ieai. = 

c-~^i^ r-^^i^u - _ - - s Fifteen Cents. 

Single c-opies, = * 



\ Magazine published monthly except In July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnee, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. kaleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1907-'08. 

Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 

Eva Rogeeson, Annie C. Wood, Rebecca Hill Shields, Minnie Leaey, 

Sallie Haywood Battle. Alice Leigh Hikes. 

Katharine Henderson, Business Manager. 

Ida Jean Rogerson and Mary C. Shuford, Assistant Business Managers. 



EDITORIAL. 



Commencement— Home! At last the time lias come when we can 
go home. How joyful we are at the prospect! and yet there is an 
element of sadness in our joy when we think of the friends we have 
made whom we may never see again. Now, however, we are thinking 
more about commencement itself and its round of gayeties. By the time 
this Muse reaches its readers examinations and all their terrors will 
be over, the long-expected annual will be out, and commencement will 
be full upon us. We are expecting many guests for this happy time, 
and we hope we will not be disappointed. Y\ 7 e hope especially that a 
great many of the alumnae will be here so there can be a successful 
meeting and the work of last year carried to a successful conclusion. 

This is the last number of the Muse that the present Board of Edi- 
tors will issue as the new board takes charge with the June Muse. We 
realize that we have not made the Muse what we washed it to be, and 
some of our readers may have been disappointed, but we have done 
our best and we hope our readers will take this into consideration when 
they wish to criticise us. We wish to thank the Alumnae for the 
help they have given us, and we hope they will aid the board of next 
year even more than they have us. And now, with best wishes for the 
new board in the coming year, we say farewell to our readers. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN LIGHTER VEI; 



Mildly Personal. 

Minnie Hazard missed a question in her English class to-day; 
Georgia Hales for fourteen seconds did not have a word to say; 
Helen Daniel did such studying that her hair all turned to gray — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

Frances Bottum got too much fresh air in the "dorm" the other night: 
Rebe Shields and Pauline Eoughton had a rousing pillow-fight; 
Martha Ferebee rose at five and studied Greek by candle light — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

Elva Crowell failed to go down town the other afternoon; 
Poor Irene Smith shed bitter tears 'cause the light-bell rang so soon. 
Suma Little's fallen in love — poor thing — with the man who's in the moon — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

Ruth Newbold wrote no poetry to go in this month's Muse; 
Carole Sandford came from town to-day without a bit of news; 
The Phi Mu's and the Kappa Delt's have about agreed to fuse — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

Nellie Kintner hasn't had a trunk from home for upwards of a week; 
Penny Slade's voice has strengthened so you can almost hear her speak; 
Kathryn Parker has so softened that you'd really call her meek — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

Frankie Self lived through a Saturday without a suitor's call; 
Ha Rountree didn't care to go to see the game of ball; 
Mary Wells complained to Esther that they both were quite too tall — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

In the Teachers' Meeting Monday night Eldredge D. got "very good"; 
Mary Crawford didn't go to town, though Miss Russell said she could; 
Nell Lewis wouldn't try to laugh, and couldn't if she would — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

M. Erwin and L. Justice both were quiet in the Dorm.; 
Kittie Henderson's reported and has promised to reform; 
Dell Davidson in Botany knew a tuber from a corm — 
Am I dreaming, or am I at St. Mary's? 

Not a girl has skipped a duty or been late for dear knows when; 
Not one needs to be reported — not even now and then; 
But there goes the bell for "lights-out" — the clock is striking ten — 
I am dreaming, no, this can not be St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 

Debate. 



Resolved: That it is easier to catch a suitor with a tennis racquet than with a dip-net. 

Affirmative. 
Now some of my hearers may not have a very clear idea of what a 
dip-net is, so I will explain one to you in the exact words of my honora- 
ble opponent, who ought to know. "It's just like a tennis racquet 
without the strings, only it's got a net napping down — you know — and 
it's round and made of iron and you catch minnows in it." My ver- 
sion of it is — something on the order of a frying pan with the bottom 
knocked out and a net put in. I hope I'm right. But to proceed- 
Now the term "catch a suitor" may be considered in two very dif- 
ferent ways, for it has two separate and distinct meanings. First, 
thinking of the question in the literal sense you may have the picture 
of a desperate, flying suitor glancing fearfully behind him, with a hot, 
red-faced, hair-stringing young lady hard on his heels, nourishing a 
tennis racquet or a dip-net in her hand. Taking this idea of the sub- 
ject I wish to show you how much superior a weapon the tennis racquet 
is in the pursuit of a suitor than a dip-net. My opponent may argue 
that the subject being "catch a suitor" there is nothing better to haul 
him in with than a dip-net. At first thought you may consider this 
true, but, although this is a very pretty little theory, it won't work out 
at all. In the first place, if he was any size, he would be too big to get 
in the dip-net and in the second place, if he did get in, he'd go right 
smack through, and then you'd be minus your suitor and your dipmet 
both. I bet my honorable opponent hasn't ever caught a suitor by that 
method, though she may have tried. Now the tennis racquet is the 
i best possible means to use in a case like this. Just dress up in a 
pretty, white tennis suit, play your suitor till he is hot and tired, then 
lure him over to sit in the shade by you, and when he is all unsuspect- 
ing swat him on the head with your tennis racquet. If you don't hit 
him hard enough for his head to go through the first time, he will be 
rendered helpless by the shock and you can keep on batting him over 
the head until you get the frame around his neck — and there you have 
him! 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Of course, you may take the term "catch a suitor" in this literal 
sense if you want to, but it has another far different meaning which 
I consider the true one, and anyhow I don't approve of the first method 
of "catching" him. It's very primitive, rude, and most unworthy of 
a girl highly trained in the business. The second and best method, 
and the one in which the tennis racquet may be used to perfection is 
a far more skillful and subtle one. You "catch" the suitor — yes — 
but in the meshes of something finer and stronger than a dipmet. And, 
considering the subject in this figurative meaning, I wish to show you 
the immense advantage the tennis racquet has over the dip-net. 

First, the tennis racquet is the best instrument in all the world to 
use in coquetting with the suitor. You can swing it over your shoul- 
der, you can glance at him through the strings, you can use it in a 
thousand different little ways to enhance the effect which you wish 
to produce. And I am sure that all who have used it to this great . 
advantage will agree with me here. 

Secondly, there is no more charming and attractive girl in the world 
than the tennis girl. When she dresses up in a fluffy white dress, 
with sleeves rolled up, and chases the ball gracefully over the court, 
and doesn't fall down, then, when she replies to his query in just the 
right tone, glancing at him over the tennis racquet — "I think it's 
forty — love," it would really be her "advantage" and she'd have him 
landed high and dry. Now just here it may be argued that the dip- 
net may be used coquettishly as well as the tennis racquet, and that one 
looks just as attractive in a fishing costume, with a big, floppy hat, as 
in a tennis suit. Well, maybe you do — but I doubt it, I'd like to 
see the person who could appear attractive when she was muddy and 
bedraggled, sunburned to a beet, and utterly disreputable looking. 
And you certainly couldn't use the dip-net coquettishly after you had 
caught minnows in it, for if you did you'd be bespeckled with mud and 
water, and then wouldn't you look pretty? Besides, a dip-net hasn't 
any connection with "love" whatsoever. 

Another great point in favor of the tennis racquet is that it has 
always been a great factor, and the tennis girl a great winner, in the 
realm of art, and the realm of literature. Study Gibson, Christy, and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



23 



Fisher pictures and you will find a majority of the most attractive ones 
have used the tennis racquet (the tennis girl) and to great advantage. 
So if great artists give the girl and the racquet such consideration and 
almost ignore the insignificant dip-net, they must assuredly be on the 
affirmative side. Now, everybody knows in the realm of story, and 
especially love stories, the tennis racquet is often used as a very effective 
instrument in the hands of the heroine to "catch" the hero. Lastly, I 
want to quote some lines to show how the tennis racquet has been hon- 
ored in poetry also: 

" It was after a game of tennis, 

My service had won the set, 
And in merry congratulation 

Our hands met over the net. 

It was after a game of tennis, 

My service had won the set, 
And in reconciliation 

Our lips met over the net." 

She certainly got him there. And how did she do it? With a tennis 
racquet. 

Now, in conclusion, I wish to sum up the many points in favor of 
the tennis racquet. First, it is just loads safer in securing a suitor 
forcibly round the neck, and, secondly, it is much more effective in 
rendering him helpless by coquetry. Then in song and story as well 
as in art it is considered a most successful weapon. And, finally, 
before I end this argument, there is one great point I wish to state in 
favor of the tennis racquet — one great advantage which it has over the 
dip-net and which would make it superior even if there were not 
another point in its favor— the tennis racquet is indispensable in a 
love game, M AE ^ Shufoed. 

Negative. 

In discussing this question, I wish my hearers clearly to understand 
that I am arguing purely from an impersonal point of view. I have 
never tried to catch a suitor — with a dip-net nor with a tennis racquet. 
However, when I have proved my point, I have no doubt but that every 
one of my hearers will try the experiment the very next time she gets 
a chance. 



24 The St. Mast's Muse. 



Of course, every one of you knows what a tennis racquet is, but for 
the benefit of those who have only a vague idea of that important factor 
in the pursuit of suitors, a dip-net, I will explain. A dip-net is a deep 
bag, which is attached to a round rim of iron with a long wooden 
handle. Surely, an instrument of coercion to fish, crabs, minnows, 
tadpoles and men. 

Again let us understand that we take "suitor" in the very broadest 
sense of the word. He need not necessarily be tall, broad-shouldered 
and good-looking. He need not even be intellectual. If he is only a 
man, he will answer the purpose. You don't have to like and admire 
him after you have caught him, nor do you have to keep him. Your 
object is to catch him. My opponent might say here: "Praise Pete, 
I wouldn't try to catch a little ugly man, with even a tennis racquet. 
Perhaps not. Neither would I. But I think that when I have shown 
that it is just as easy to catch a man, whoever he mmj be, with a dip- 
net as with a tennis racquet, that I have proved my point. I do not 
now mean to say that you can't catch a tall, handsome suitor with a 
dip-net because I have abundant proof that you can. 

We wish, now, to take the word "catch" in its two meanings. First, 
that of "by main force.'' Of course, you will all agree with me that 
it is easier to catch a suitor with a c/i/;-net by main force. In the first 
place, I could creep up behind him and slip the iron ring over his head, 
just as easy as can be. And haven't I caught him fast? How in 
the world could he get away with an iron ring around his neck 
and his head in a net ? He couldn't possibly. You certainly couldn't 
catch a man around the neck with a tennis racquet. Of course, you 
could with a broken one, but we are not discussing broken tennis 
racquets. My opponent might argue here, that with a tennis racquet 
you might knock the tennis balls after the man, knock him down and 
•so catch him. But I am not here to uphold the clip-net against tennis 
racquet and balls. 

Another good and original way of catching a man with a dip-net is 
to throw it around his feet and so entangle him that he would fall and 
there he would have to stay. For how could he get up with his feet 
all tied? 'Tis true, he might kick loose, eventually, but what man 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



would not submit, to save his precious dignity \ And a man does not 
usually kick when a girl has the upper hand. He's afraid to. Now, 
could you tangle a man up in a tennis racquet ? Why, certainly not. 
A person with any sense at all would see that he would slip off. 

Next, we will take the word "catch" in its right sense as used here. 
That of making a man fall in love with you. You need not necessarily 
fall in love with him. My opponent might argue under this head that 
a girl is so attractive when she plays tennis, no man could help falling 
victim to her charms. We read very pretty stories about the tennis 
girl. How she is always dressed in white from tip to toe; her cheeks 
glowing from the exercise and her hair blowing in little beau-catchers 
about her face while she coquets with her racquet. We also read very 
pretty poems about the tennis girl. This is all a very pretty theory. 
But come down to leal life. Picture to yourself the tennis girl as she 
really is. Face fiery red, hair stringing in her eyes, and skirts all be- 
draggled ! I don't call that very attractive. Of course, we admit that 
if she is an attractive girl, she will still look attractive to a certain 
extent. But compare her with our dip-net girl and see how much 
easier it is for her to look attractive than the tennis girl. She also is 
dressed in white, standing in a row-boat, which is being pushed along 
the edge of a stream in the deep shade of the cypress trees on the bank. 
She is holding a dip-net in her hand, which, as the boat noses into the 
thick water-lilies, she dips into the thick leaves and brings up a net 
full of shrimps. Her face under the wide, bonnet-leaf hat, is flushed, 
too, but she is not as red as a beet. Is not the fishing girl attractive? 
Surely the man in the boat will be brought to take notice. Then 
again, does it not take perseverance to sit still, without saying a word, 
for fear you will scare the shrimps into the mud % And is not perse- 
verance in a girl enough to win any man ? 

Also, in a game of tennis, the man and girl are on different sides, 
whereas in fishing they are always together. Of course, my opponent 
will shrug her shoulders and say that when playing double they would 
be on the same side, and, what's more, be playing partners. But what 
would be the advantage when there were onlookers ? 

My last reason for holding that it is easier to catch a suitor with 
a dip-net than a tennis racquet is (it's a strong one) that with a dip- 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 

net you can very easily catch, the most delicious crabs, and is not the 
surest way to a man's heart through his appetite? Certainly, all 
philosophers agree upon this. And any one of you who has a brother 
will agree with me that all boys like to eat anything they can get their 
hands on. Is it not true ? 

And so, in conclusion, I will say that it is easier to catch a suitor ' 
with a dip-net than with a tennis racquet because, (1) you can slip 
it over his head; (2) you can entangle his feet in the net; (3) the 
dip-net girl is more attractive than the tennis girl, and, (4) that with 
the dip-net you can catch crabs and what man likes to satisfy above all 
things is his appetite. And I would like to add that : 

" Fishing, fishing, fishing, 
Is ever the gentlest of arts, 
Whether you fish for fishes, 
Or whether you fish for hearts." 

Ida HoGERSoisr. 



Exchanges. 



The Muse acknowledges with thanks the receipt since its last issue 
of the following exchanges : 

Acorn, College of Charleston Magazine, Concept, Emory and Henry 
Era, Erskinian, Georgia Tech, Goldsboro High School Magazine, 
Greensboro High School Magazine, Guidon, Hone Scholasticce, Ivy, 
Maryland Collegian, Mercerian, Orange and Blue, Palmetto, Talisman, 
Trinity Archive, Vanderbilt Observer, University Magazine, Wake 
Forest Student. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh, 
f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
t, Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, gJJ F R Tucker s R^ieighf 

(.Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Secretary, - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 

Treasurer, - Miss Martha A. Dowd, West Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL. 



It is a source of genuine regret that it seemed inexpedient to have 
this year a more fitting observance of Alumna Day, May 12th, at the 
School. As the School's birthday this should be a day of special ob- 
servance for all St. Maryan's, and it doubtless will become so if our 
alumna? energies can be more fully aroused. 

The Rector remembered the day in the morning and evening services, 
but there was no special observance. At the morning service the Rec- 
tor used the following prayer, which is given among the Prayers of 
Church Schools in Rev. John Wright's "Prayers for Priest and People" 
as the special prayer of St. Mary's School, Raleigh. It is not familiar 
to the St. Mary's of the present, and most of us have come to look upon 
the "0 God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful," etc., of the Institu- 
tion Office, which has been so familiar and so generally used of late 
years, as our special prayer, and we should like very much to know just 
what the origin and past connection of this longer prayer with St. 
Mary's is. Rev. Mr. Wright states the source of most of the prayers 
quoted in his compilation but does not locate this one. Perhaps some 
of the Alumna? can enlighten us ? 

Almighty God, the fountain of all wisdom, who hast taught us, in Thy Holy Word, 
that to know Thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom Thou hast sent, is 
everlasting life; We humbly beseech Thee to receive our prayers and supplications 
which we now offer unto Thee for our schools and colleges throughout this land; 
j Grant that they who teach and govern in them may perceive and know what things 
they ought to do, and may also have grace and strength to fulfill the same; and to 



28 The St. Mart's Muse. 



those who are taught and trained, give Thy gracious help, that they may acquire 
such knowledge as may fit them for the stations in life to which they may he called, 
and above all things, may receive instructions of heavenly wisdom and know the 
things that belong unto their peace. Grant this, Heavenly Father, for Jesus 
Christ's sake, our Lord. Amen. 



The Alumnae Records. 



The work of compiling the Alumnae Lists goes on slowly. The first 
step in the work, the overhauling of the School Registers beginning in 
1879 and the alphabetical arrangement of the names of the alumnae 
since 1879, has not yet been completed. This list will include about 
two thousand names, and after it has been gotten into as accurate shape 
as is possible with the information at hand — with the present names 
and addresses of the "old girls" — an effort will be made to get sys- 
tematic help from the alumnae in further perfecting the record. 

On the more important work of compiling the alumnae lists before 
1879, when no school records are apparently in existence, a start has 
hardly been made. Thanks to Mrs. B. S. Skinner, of Raleigh, we 
are in possession of an almost complete list of the girls of 1864-'65 ; 
and Miss Lena Smith, of Scotland Neck, has furnished a full list of 
the pupils of 1869-'70. If other Alumnae with good memories or who 
have preserved records of their school days, would follow the example 
of Mrs. Skinner and Miss Smith, we would have a good frame-work 
with which to begin. 

A seemingly fair estimate places the number of Alumnae of the 
School at about five thousand. At present there would be difficulty 
in supplying the accurate names and addresses of five hundred. It 
is easy to see how much the forwarding of any alumnae work is retarded 
by this fact and how strongly it calls for improvement if the Alumnae 
as a body are really to continue to be an effective force for the school. 
Co-operation in this matter merely on the part of those of the Alumnae 
who see The Muse would increase these five hundred names and ad- 
dresses to fifteen hundred before September. May we hope for that 
much. 

It must be borne in mind that in keeping touch with people by cor- 
respondence accuracy counts for much. To know that "Sallie Smith," 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



of Atlanta, married "Tom Brown" about 1890 and "they went to live 
in New York/' or, it may be, "are living in New York," is chiefly 
helpful in that it gives a clue which, if our friends in Atlanta and 
New York will help us in following it up, may give us an accurate 
name and address. And while the task is easier in the smaller cities 
and towns it becomes decidedly difficult even then when married names 
have often entirely obscured the school girl identity and the Alumnas 
are more or less newcomers and of different generations. 



Alumnae Weddings. 



The Muse extends best wishes to "Christine Schussler" (1900- ), 

"Julia Bowen" (1900- ), and "Mattie Brigman" (1906) for a long 

and happy wedded life. 

Conniff-Schussler. 

The wedding of Miss Christine Schussler, of Asheville, and Harry 
Conniff, of Montgomery, Ala., was celebrated Wednesday, April 22d, 
at Trinity church, by the Kev. Mr. McCready. The church was beau- 
tifully decorated with tall Easter lilies, white carnations and palms. 
The maid of honor, Miss Kathleen Wright (a cousin of the bride), 
was attired in pale yellow satin and carried a bouquet, of white sweet 
peas. Miss Annie Arden Jervey and Miss Olive Gaskell, of Tarboro, 
were the bridesmaids and wore gowns of white chiffon over yellow 
taffeta carrying bouquets of white carnations. Miss Schussler was un- 
usually beautiful in her bridal gown of soft, shimmering silk en empire, 
old rose point ornamented the bodice. A tulle veil suspended from 
a coronet of orange blossoms fell to the hem of the long train. Miss 
Schussler's only ornament was a handsome sunburst of pearls and dia- 
monds, the gift of the groom. A shower bouquet of lilies of the valley 
completed the toilette. Mr. Gaskell, of Tarboro, an old friend of the 
family, gave the bride away. William Conniff, brother of the bride- 
groom, was best man. The ushers were Harry Schussler, Perry Cobb, 
Marion Guerrard and Gus Spong. A reception followed the ceremony 
at the home of the bride in Merrimon avenue. Mr. and Mrs. Con- 
niff's future home will be Montgomery, Ala. 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Peebles-Bowen. 

Mr. William Cornelius Bowen 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of his daughter 

Julia South all 

to 

Mr. Calvert Goosley Peebles 

on the evening of Thursday the fourth of June, 

nineteen hundred and eight, 

at nine o'clock, 

The Church of the Saviour, 

Jackson, North Carolina. 



HicKs-Brigman. 



Mr. and Mrs. John Washington Brigman 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Mattie 

to 

Mr. Oscar Vernon Hicks 

on Thursday evening, May twenty-eighth, 

one thousand nine hundred and eight, 

at eight o'clock, 

Methodist Church, 

Rockingham, North Carolina. 



Notes of Interest to the Alumnae. 



Miss Betsy London, of Pittsboro (1906), has been appointed Sponsor 
for the North Carolina Division of the United Confederate Veterans 
for the reunion at Birmingham in June. 

The death of Bishop Capers, beloved as he was by all who knew him, 
removes another good friend of St. Mary's. His only visit to the 
school in very late years was made in February, 190 7, when the Board 



The St. Maky's Muse. 31 



of Trustees met in special session to choose a Eector. At lunch that 
day he spoke briefly to the girls in the dining-room and it is safe to 
say that the impression made by that one very brief talk lingers with 
most of his hearers yet. 

At the recent Council of the Diocese of South Carolina, Mr. T. W. 
Bacot, of Charleston, was elected to the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's 
to succeed Mr. H. P. Duvall, of Cher aw, who declined re-election. Mr. 
Lay attended the council in Charleston and met many of the prominent 
churchmen of the Diocese. He made an address before the council 
on St. Mary's and its work and needs. 

Among those who have sailed this month for England to attend the 
Pan-Anglican Council are Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, Kev. Dr. Drane, 
of Edenton, and Mr. D. Y. Cooper, of Henderson, of our Trustees. 
Mr. Cooper is accompanied by Miss Genevieve (1905-'07). Bishop 
Cheshire expects during his absence to visit the Jeudwines at their 
home in Somerset. 

Mrs, M. T. Leak ("Bessie Smedes") and her niece, Miss Annie 
Root, sailed for Europe for the summer in April. Miss Eenner's party, 
including among others Miss Eleanor Thomas and Miss Emily Cam- 
son, '07, go early in June. On the other hand, Miss Hull and Miss 
Pixley start back for this country the latter part of this month. 



What Determines. 



One ship sails east, another sails west, 

With the selfsame winds that blow; 
5 Tis the set of the sail, and not the gale, 

That tells us the way they go. 

Like the winds of the sea are the ways of Fate, 

As we voyage along through life; 
'Tis the set of the soul that decides our goal 

And not the calm or the strife. 

G. R. Wharton, in the University Magazine. 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The; MUSE generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



& TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHUTOGHAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



The 1908 Annual Muse. 

The Year Book of the Students of 

St. Mary's. 

Ready for delivery about May 25th. 

$2.00 per copy delivered. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 

FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



f . C. STRONACH'S SONS CO. 



I GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



My friend, have you heard of the town of Yawn, 

On the banks of the River Slow, 
Where blooms the wait-a-while flower fair, 
Where the some-tinie-or-other scents the air, 

And the soft go-easy grow? 

It lies in the Valley of What's-the-Use, 

In the province of Let-Her-Slide, 
That Tired Feeling is native there; 
It's the home of the listless and I-don't-care, 

Where the Put-It-Off abide. 



M. ROSENTH 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <fc HARGETT STS. 



FOR Q.UICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OB ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Useth best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application -will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHOEN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



Hoot and Toot Hottentot. 



If a Hottentot taught a Hottentot tot 
To tot ere the tot could totter, 

Ought the Hottentot tot 

To be taught to say "aught" 
Or "naught," or what ought to be taught her? 

Or— 

If to hoot and to toot a Hottentot tot 

Be taught by a Hottentot footer, 
Should the footer get hot if the Hottentot tot 

Hoot and toot at the Hottentot tutor? 



— Selected. 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

Kinston, N. C, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Good things alwavs at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Ralei gh, N. C. 

H.ST EINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets. 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds . 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 

ROBT. SIMPSON, Drugs ^lfI f S 8 s ;e te . 



ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



CHE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Oandy— China. 

Stationery— Brie-a-brac. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




DR. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 

H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



A teacher in a Connecticut country school gave one of her pupils these two 
sentences to correct: 

1. "The hen has three legs." 

Z. ''Who done it?" 

The little fellow looked at his slate a minute and then wrote seriously: "It 
wan't the hen's fault; God done it." — Est. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



BARRETT & THOMPSON, 
Architects and Engineers. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital $15,000 Surplus 550,000. Deposits over 
$750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

123 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Eayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

THIRD GENERATION OF SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
W. N. Jones, Vice-President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier 
J. B. Timbeblake, Ass't Cashier. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleigh, N. 0. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 

J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



Thinly It Over. 



If Johnny Jones has seven dogs 

And every dog is white, 
And fourteen eats came chasing 'round, 

Each one as black as night; 
Each two cats have eighteen lives 

Less three destroyed by rats, 
How many lives must three dogs take 

Before they kill eight cats? 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERS. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 

St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 
66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1909. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. r IHE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: J £ THE AR1 SCHOOL 



5. I HE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1907-08 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Steinway Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 

RECTOR. 



3une, 1908 



St, flfoary'e Abuse 




Hlumme 2>as dumber 
IRalefob, ft (L 




Mrs. Catharine deRosset Meares, 

Lady-Principal, 1879-1881. 

(As she looked in the days of her Lady-Prineipalship.) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

ALUMNAE DAY NUMBER. 



Vol. XII. June, 1908. No. & 



THIRD ALUMNAE NUMBER. 



Issued in commemoration of the sixty-fifth anniversary of the founding of St. 
Mary's by Dr. Aldert Smedes, May 12, 1842, and the fiftieth anniversary of the 
erection of the Chapel. 



CONTENTS. 

An Editorial Explanation. 

Auld Lang Syne: St. Mary's Sarah Prince Thomas. 

The Chapel of St. Mary's Adelaide E. Smith. 

The Portrait of Bishop Eavenscroft Marshall DeLancey Haywood. 

Reminiscences of St. Mary's ( 1855-6) Mary Pearson Davis. 

A Greeting to St. Mary's 

St. Mary's in the '40's Ellen Brownlow. 

Reports of the Founders' Day Meetings of 1907: 

Asheville. Oxford. 

Chapel Rill. Rock Hill. 

Charlotte. Scotland Neck. 

Edenton. Tarboro. 

Hillsloro. Wilmington. 

Morganton. 
Table of Contents of the First and Second Alumnae Numbers. 



The St. Mary f s Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = - - - One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh n. e. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, 1908. 

Georgia Stanton Hales, Editor-in-Chief. 

Eva Rogerson, Annie C. Wood, Rebecca Hill Shields, Minnie Leaky, 

Sallie Haywood Battle, Alice Leigh Hines. 

Ida Jean Rogerson and Mary C. Shuford, Business Managers. 



Editorial. 

This third Alumnae Number of the monthly Muse was planned to 
commemorate the 65th anniversary of the founding of St. Mary's and 
the 50th anniversary of the building of the "little brown Chapel, we all 
love so well." It should therefore have appeared in May, 1907, more 
than a year ago, but its publication has had to be deferred first to Foun- 
der's Day, 1907, and then to Alumna? Day, 1908, and it now finally 
appears bearing the date of Alumnse Day, though that day is more than 
a month past. 

Only one fact will excuse publication so much delayed. The Alumnse 
Numbers, in contrast to the other numbers of the Muse, are intended 
to chronicle not current history but the history of the past as it con- 
cerns St, Mary's, and in these numbers we hope to preserve as fully as 
possible such glimpses of the past as will serve as material for the 
"personal touch" in the history of St. Mary's that shall be written in 
future. The articles included here are as interesting as a year ago, 
and the accounts of the Founders' Day Meetings of the Alumna? in the 
various towns, while distinctly not as timely as if they had been pub- 
lished immediately after the meetings were held, yet serve two pur- 
poses — to show the extent of the first feeble attempt to have a Founders' 
Day Commemoration wherever two or more Alumnse are gathered in 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



one community thus lending encouragement for the future, and to give 
the Alumnae a better idea of the alumnae-groups in the several towns, 
and perhaps even to re-locate for some of them some of their missing 
friends. 

The Muse would like, so far as possible, to have copies of the Alumnae 
numbers in the hands of every one actively interested, and a request 
for a copy will bring one as long as they are in print; but, in return, 
the Editors would have the readers bear in mind one essential fact: 
The continuance of Alumnae Numbers, and their value, depends en- 
tirely upon the amount of material suitable for publication. The first 
number appeared in April, 1906 ; the second in December, 1906 ; the 
third is only now ready for publication. It would be fitting to have 
the fourth ready for next Founders' Day (November 1st), but its ap- 
pearance then depends on the readiness of the Alumnae to supply the 
material. A glance over the titles of the articles that have been pub- 
lished in the first three numbers will show clearly that only a few of 
the sixteen school generations which are included in the life of St. 
Mary's have been treated of as yet, The "girls" of the 40's and 50's 
and 60's have been doing their part, but their younger sisters have as 
yet seemed disinclined or not quite ready to write. As she thinks over 
her school days may each Alumna bear the Muse and her sisters in 
mind and help if she can. 

It is a privilege to present to the Alumnae in this Muse two photo- 
graphs of Mrs. Meares, the one showing her as she is, the other as she 
was in the days of her Lady-Principalship in the early 80's. The Muse 
is indebted to her son, Mr. Kichard Meares, for the photographs from 
which the cuts are made. 

The Editors would express their appreciation to the Alumnae who 
have made this Muse possible by their contributions, and to Mr. Mar- 
shall DeLancey Haywood for his article on the Eavenscroft painting. 
Mr. Haywood is at present at work on a history of the Bishops of North 
Carolina, which will doubtless prove of much interest and value, and 
this sketch is, as it were, a fragment from the material which he is 
working up into his new book. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Auld Lang Syne: St. Mary's. 



St. Mary's ! oh, how sweet to us 

That old beloved name sounds; 
Dear memories come trooping back 

Of chapel, buildings, grounds. 

The girls we used to love so well, 

And others that we knew — 
The parlor, school-room, staircase, hall, 

That were so dear to you. 

The teachers whom we owe so much, 

So dear to niem'ry .still ; 
The thoughts of them come back to us, 

Our grateful hearts to fill. 

The lessons that we tried to learn, 

The games we used to play — 
Ah! would those happy days return 

Continually to stay. 

We hear the old familiar hymns, 

The organ's solemn peal, 
And all the Chapel sei vices 

To-day seem just as real. 

The girls we used to know are gone 

And others take their place; 
Yes, if to-day we should return 

We'd hardly know a face — 

But matter not how long the time, 

How far we have to roam; 
For aye we'll think with deepest love 

Of our St. Mary's home. S. P. T. 



The Chapel— St. Mary's. 



By "Adelaide Evans Smith " (Miss Ad E. Smith, of Scotland Neck.) 



When I went to St. Mary's School in January, 1856, the lower floor 
of the East Rock House was used as the Chapel. Mrs. Ed. Foxhall, nee 
Mary Hargrave, told me at the Tarboro Convention that she was con- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



firmed there on Whitsunday, 1857. I did not return to school in Jan- 
uary of that year, and missed the whole session. When I went back in 
July the new Chapel was completed, having been built by the owners of 
the property, the Camerons. Dr. Smedes gave the stone steps at the 
front door, the protecting hood and the stained glass window above. 
They were his gift, but his personality pervaded the whole Chapel to 
such an extent that it is virtually a memorial of him. I can recall how 
he held the services there, Sunday after Sunday, and how they gained 
in reverence because they were held in a building set apart for the wor- 
ship of God. The value of the lessons learned there can never be esti- 
mated. The Bible lesson learned on Sunday morning was given out by 
him during the week in the school room. As he read out the verses we 
took down the numbers, and copied them out in full, in blank books. 
After the regular morning service in the Chapel, we marched into the 
class rooms, and the first recitation every day was the Bible lesson, the 
teacher indicating who should begin. Then the verses would be re- 
peated reverently by each pupil in turn, the only break being an occa- 
sional correction. But this came very seldom, for it was a point of 
honor not to miss a word. Then the poetry for the week followed in the 
same way, line by line. We learned selections from Paradise Lost, Shake- 
speare, Cowper's Task, Thompson's Seasons, Young's Night Thoughts. 
Every Tuesday and Thursday in Chapel lectures were given on the 
Bible lesson. Abstracts were written, during writing half hour, and 
these were passed to Dr. Smedes for correction in alphabetical order. 
When the session closed, and those girls were scattered through the 
Southern States, the teachings given from the chancel went with them 
as a part of themselves, incorporated into their very being. Wherever 
a church was near enough to attend, they must go, because they were 
lonely without those daily services, and felt the need of them. If there 
was none, they started a Sunday School, the nucleus of a church. Wit- 
ness St. Mary's, Edgecombe County, begun by a St. Mary's girl, and 
Lawrence, taught by another. When in Birmingham, Ala., last fall, I 
met Mrs. White, nee Sadie Waller, who had a Sunday School in the 
mountains near there. She called on me, when she came to town to 
attend an Auxiliary meeting, and invited me to go with her. She asked 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



many questions about St, Mary's, and said that the lessons learned there 
had never been forgotten. The class of '56 will remember her as our 
graceful "May Queen" of that year. The Sunday afternoon services 
were so beautiful and restful that the town people often came to them. 
Miss Mildred Cameron was wheeled there in her straw carriage. She 
has often told me how she enjoyed hearing the hymn, "Softly Now the 
Light of Day," sung when the rays of the low descending sun were too 
dim to allow one to see the words. But there was no need for books; 
the words were engraven on their hearts. 

I never paid a visit to Kaleigh without going to the Chapel. I was 
present when Bishop Atkinson preached the Memorial Sermon on Dr. 
Smedes. He said there was not a minister in the Diocese whose teach- 
ings had such far-reaching results. We love the lectern because it was 
given in memory of him on the fiftieth anniversary of his founding 
St. Mary's. I was at the Convention in Raleigh, held at the Church of 
the Good Shepherd, when it was decided that the Diocese would pur- 
chase St. Mary's School. While the discussion was still going on at the 
church, we ladies had gone to a soiree at the school. When Mr. Ben- 
nett Smedes came in the parlor, he walked to where I was standing 
and told mei that the Convention had decided to buy the school. I shall 
never forget the radiant expression on his face when I exclaimed, 
"JSFow, the Chapel can never be taken from us!" He said, "I wanted 
to tell you myself, because you loved my father." It seems to me that 
every tone of the organ should make us think of Mr. Bennett Smedes, 
for when the school affairs were settled after his death, his wife gave the 
organ, which he had placed in the Chapel, to the trustees for the school. 

My next visit of any special interest connected with the Chapel was 
when the Commencement was held at which the Alumnas completed the 
Smedes scholarship. It is fitting that the gifts these devoted men had 
made to many pupils during their lifetime should be extended to future 
generations. If they furnished the board and tuition, Mrs. Smedes 
gave the kindly "mothering" which made us feel that we had a home 
at St. Mary's. She was always so bright and cheery, it was impossible 
to feel sad or lonely in her presence. So I was rejoiced to see a memo- 
rial window to her in the chancel just above the altar. There are other 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



windows which bring to mind the dear ones who- loved and served St. 
Mary's during their lives, and are now remembered by those who are 
left behind to walk in their footsteps. I have dwelt mostly on the past. 
The present pupils, and those who have just graduated, will have equally 
as tender associations connected with Bishop Bratton and Mr. DuBose. 
My heart was with you during the consecration services, when you had 
a Bishop's chair and a new chalice to rejoice over. The next object 
in view is a window "For All Thy Saints at Rest." When that shall be 
in place, we will look at it, and think of each clergyman who has offi- 
ciated in the chancel, each teacher who has helped to mould the charac- 
ters of the students, and of that band of students who have been coming 
here since May 12, 1842. May we join in spirit with them, and realize 

that 

"Angels and living saints, and dead 
But one communion make." 

Adelaide Evans Smith. 
Scotland Neck, N". C, June, 1907. 



The Portrait of Bishop Ravenscroft at St. Mary's. 



By Marshall DeLancey Haywood. 



Of the many hundreds — nay, even thousands — who, throughout some 
decades past, have gazed with admiration upon the majestic form of the 
Bight Reverend John Stark Ravenscroft, clad in the robes of his sacred 
office, as depicted in the full-length oil portrait which hangs in the par- 
lor of St. Mary's School, at Raleigh, few know anything of the painter 
to whose master-hand we are indebted for this splendid work of art. 
The inscription thereon is simply "Eichholtz, 1830." As I have in 
preparation a little work which will deal with the lives of the Bishops 
of North Carolina from the foundation of the Episcopate in the State 
down to the division of the Diocese in 1883, I naturally desired to know 
something of the artist who painted this portrait. Having in my pri- 
vate library a dictionary of painters and engravers extending over 
eleven hundred pages, I thought this work would enlighten me — but 
nowhere therein was Mr. Eichholtz mentioned; nor could I find hi? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



name recorded in any of the works on art, or encyclopaedias of American 
biography, in the North Carolina State Library. It then occurred to 
me that, though the portrait was dated 1830, it must have been begun 
as early as 1829, because Bishop Ravenscroft died at the beginning of 
1830 (March 5th), and was in feeble health for some months prior 
thereto. This led me to direct my inquiries to Philadelphia, knowing 
that the Bishop was there in the Fall of 1829, in attendance upon a 
General Convention of the Church ; and, from that city, I obtained the 
desired information through the courtesy of Dr. John Woolf Jordan, 
Librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. From the data 
furnished by Dr. Jordan I learn as follows : 

Jacob Eichholtz was born of German ancestry in the county of 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in the year 1776, and died in the city q{ 
Philadelphia on the 11th of May, 1842. His father, Leonard Eich- 
holtz, and several other members of his family, fought for American 
independence in the army of the Revolution. At the early age of seven, 
young Eichholtz began to evince that love of art which was afterward 
his controlling passion. Upon approaching manhood, he was appren- 
ticed to a coppersmith, and later engaged in the same trade after serving 
out his apprenticeship. But his interest in art could not be repressed, 
and he abandoned his shop for a studio. He soon acquired high repu- 
tation as an artist, and numbered among his patrons some of the most 
eminent Americans of his day. Of the many portraits by him now 
known to be in existence is one of the great jurist and historian, John 
Marshall, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. 
He also painted one of the well-known financier, Nicholas Biddle, Presi- 
dent of the Bank of the United States, and a great many others in addi- 
tion to that of Bishop Ravenscroft. On one or more occasions Mr. 
Eichholtz visited Boston, was received with high favor there, and gained 
commendation from such renowned artists as Stuart and Sully, with 
both of whom he formed a strong friendship. 

The Ravenscroft portrait at St. Mary's was painted by order of 
Charles P. Mallett, a devout churchman, who was Senior Warden of St. 
John's Church at Fayetteville. When that gentleman broke up house- 
keeping some years before the War Between the States, the portrait was 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 



obtained from him for St. Mary's by its first Rector, the Reverend Al- 
dert Smedes. At the same time, Dr. Smedes purchased from Mr. Mal- 
lett the large mirror in the parlor at St. Mary's. In addition to Mr. 
Mallett, Bishop Ravenscroft had numerous friends in Fayetteville, one 
of these, John W. Wright, having a nephew and adopted son, Ravens- 
croft Wright, named for him. This namesake died young and is buried 
in Cross Creek Cemetery at Fayetteville. Mr. Wright was for many 
years Treasurer of the Diocese. In his will he left a legacy to provide 
payment for a new edition of Bishop Ravenscroft's sermons. In 1831, 
a school was established at Fayetteville and called Ravenscroft Academy, 
in honor of the Bishop. Its trustees, at the time when it was estab- 
lished, were Charles P. Mallett, Charles Stuart, Charles T. Haigh, John 
W. Wright, and Robert Strange. Many years later there was also an 
institution of learning at Asheville called Ravenscroft School. Bishop 
Ravenscroft had no children of his own, though twice married, but 
adopted five children named Hepburn, in Virginia, of which State he 
was a native. 

In accordance with a wish expressed during his last illness, Bishop 
Ravenscroft's body was interred beneath the chancel of Christ Church 
at Raleigh, where there is a tablet bearing a Latin inscription to his 
memory. For many years he was Rector of Christ Church and Bishop 
of North Carolina, holding the offices jointly. A year or two before 
his death he removed to the old town of Williamsboro, in Granville 
County ; but, after his wife died, he sold his effects there, intending to 
remove to Fayetteville. Before doing this, however, he accepted an in- 
vitation from the eminent lawyer, Gavin Hogg (one of the vestrymen 
of Christ Church), to visit his home in Raleigh, and died during this 
visit in the fifty-eighth year of his age. 



Reminiscences of St. Mary's, 1855-'56. 



By "Mary Pearson" (Mrs. Mary Pearson Davis, of Salisbury, N. C. 



In the summer of 1855 I traveled with my father to Raleigh to 
enter St. Mary's School. In these days it is hard to realize what a 
journey of about one hundred and fifty miles meant, by private convey- 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ance and stage coach and only a small part of the way by rail. We 
drove to Salem in our carriage. Then we took the stage, a large three- 
seated coach for nine passengers, — their baggage stored away in "The 
Boot" as it was called. We traveled day and night, changing horses, 
and getting the best of meals at the regular stopping places, our arrival 
being heralded by the lusty notes of the horn, which also called together 
those who wished to hear the news or to meet friends. When we reached 
Durham, remarkable as it may now seem, had at that time only two team 
houses, one of which was the hotel. On our arrival in Ealeigh we went 
at once to St. Mary's, in the Yarborough House omnibus, which was 
very long, and was drawn by four fine horses. In a short time St. 
Mary's was reached. I was taken in and warmly welcomed by my 
sister, who had been there for twelve months, so I was spared much of 
the homesickness which usually falls to the lot of the new girls. We 
had French lessons every day during the vacation, and the rest of the 
time amused ourselves as we pleased, and the time passed very pleas- 
antly. When the teachers and girls began to come, there was much 
interest and pleasure for those of us who had felt lonely. Now all was 
life and commotion, and soon we were all at work. The Chapel was on 
the lower floor of the right Rock House, and we thought it very nice 
indeed, but all felt delighted when Dr. Smedes said that as soon as pos- 
sible he was going to arrange to have a new one, which was to be apart 
from the other buildings. We all tried to give a little as we could, and 
in the spring or summer of 1855, it was at last commenced, and from 
that time until it was finished was a great source of interest to us all. 
While we all loved the old one, we were most anxious about the new 
one. I was at that time in the West Rock House in the corner alcove, 
and my window looked out on it, and day by day I watched its growth, 
but as I remember it was not ready to be consecrated while I was still 
there. I left school in the winter of 1856. 

There was a high sense of honor among the girls in those days, and I 
trust that it is still there. There were about one hundred and twelve 
boarders, and a number of day scholars, and while all were not as good 
as they might have been, it was far above the average, and the influence 
that Dr. Smedes had for good can not be over estimated. No man could 



The St. Mart's Muse. 11 



ever have had more skill in the management of girls. As a teacher he 
was all that could have been asked. If the lesson had been properly 
studied he showed such appreciation of the efforts that the student had 
made that that was a stimulus for more effort the next time. If the 
lesson had not been properly learned, while he could detect it in a mo- 
ment, he could draw out all that was known, and make even the most 
careless try to do better next time. 

There were girls from all over the State, and the South, and I recall 
the pleasant days often, and I think I could give the names of nearly 
all of them, and now I am always glad to meet any of them, as I 
often do. 

Miss Evertson had a Missionary Society, and once a week Ave met 
in one of the basement rooms, and made clothes to send to Dr. Bush for 
the Indians, and my first lessons in making clothes myself were learned 
there, and they stood me in good stead, when the war times came on so 

soon. I was in Miss Latin class with Ed. and Bish 

Smedes, and in such a short time both fell on the field of battle. 

Dr. Smedes had many trials in a short time after I was there. First 
losing his oldest son, and then the other so soon afterwards, and to have 
to meet all the trials of war times. 

If I may be allowed I will add one story which I have often recalled. 
Dr. Smedes was fond of music, and he had Bish to take lessons on the 
violin. Bish made very little progress, preferring marbles, etc., to the 
practicing. Finally Dr. Smedes told him he would pay him twenty- 
five cents for every tune he would learn. So Bish went to work, and on 
Saturday made his appearance in the study with his violin, and a very 
smiling face. The music commenced, and continued for some time, 
and Bish triumphantly called out "twenty-five tunes." Dr. Smedes 
said, "I must send for Stella, and she will have to tell me if you 'are 
correct." So Stella came, and all was gone over, and Bish enjoyed to 
the full his money. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Greeting to St. Mary's School. 



(On the celebration of its Fiftieth Anniversary, June 5, 1892. 

All-hail, St. Mary's! Lift thy modest eyes. 
Ten lustrums see elapsed since thou didst rise 
To bless the Southland with thy ministries. 

Fair maids of tender years, whom thou didst train 
To walk in Wisdom's ways, and, not in vain, 
To choose the "good part" Mary chose to gain, 

These, matrons grown, to thee their daughters send, 
Then daughters' daughters to thy care commend, 
Till in one band three generations blend. 

Thou mouldest mothers; these their sons create, 
Bishops and Presidents, the good, the great, 
And bless with equal hand the Church and State. 

Sound learning, manners pure, the holy Creed, 
Delivered once for all, still be the seed 
Thou so west, and perennial life thy meed — 

Perennial life, perennial influence, 

Truth, purity and love still flowing thence, 

With all the sweets of peace and innocence. 



St. Mary's in the Forties. 



By "Ellen Brownlow" (Miss Ellen Brownlow, of Greenville), 



I see from trie March number of the Muse that the Editorial Corps 
would be glad of some reminiscences of the dear old school from the 
old. Alumnae. It is a request that can not be disregarded by a daughter 
of St. Mary's, — it may be the last with which I can comply — so even at 
the expense of some idle tears, when thinking of "the days that are no 
more," — I will summon around me the draperied ghosts of St. Mary's 
of the Forties, draperied with the loving reverence that time can not 
obliterate. 

What a beautiful place it was in 1845, when I joined the ranks! 
Many years have passed away since I walked amid the beautiful trees 




Mrs. Catharine deRosset Meares. 
(From a recent photograph.) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

that constituted the grove, many have been the improvements, but to me, 
at least, it can not be more beautiful now than when a very tearful, 
homesick girl I entered the enclosure. 

There was then only the large brick building and the two Rock 
Houses on each side, the latter connected with the Main Building by a 
trellised brick walk covered with vines and blossoming plants. I dare 
say the interior of the brick house was very much as now — on the first 
floor, the long parlor on the right of the broad hall as one entered; the 
main school-room with its desks, blackboards, cases of chemical and 
philosophical apparatus on the left. The reception room was then 
almost crowded with musical instruments, the walls nearly covered with 
works of art. I do wonder if that mirth provoking Bacchante is still 
peeping through the grape vines, still very beautiful in her changeless 
youth. So many loving memories gather around me as I try to write ! 

Of course dear Dr. Smedes is the central figure on any canvas of St. 
Mary's. How we loved and reverenced him ! A young and very hand- 
some man, features almost too regular, but the almost feminine beauty 
of his mouth and perfect teeth was crowned by a very noble brow in- 
stinct with intelligence which gauged the worth and extent of his scholars 
with a glance, and beneath the breadth ©f brow shone and sparkled his 
bright blue eyes with kind appreciation of our efforts to please him. 
I must group his family around him as they so loved to be : 

First, dear Mrs. Smedes, so sweet and gracious in manner and per- 
son, that she won our girlish hearts at once, and we never swerved from 
our allegiance. I remember her most vividly in a certain blue dress 
with appropriate lace and ribbons that she sometimes wore when invited 
out for the evening, with her wealth of soft brown hair, braided around 
her head, and curls of it falling behind her ears. Lyell was then a 
handsome, manly boy of perhaps seven years, principally intent on 
learning to ride a pony. Next came Bennett, very much like his father 
and really beautiful. I think Edward was next. I never became very 
well acquainted with him, and so have the least to say of him. Ives 
was the baby, a wee toddler of perhaps three years, who had ways of his 
own that tended, Mrs. Smedes said, to consolation, for Ives was a re- 
source to homesick pupils. 
4 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



How little we thought how bravely and nobly those petted boys 
would give up their glorious youth in defense of our Southland. Gal- 
lant Confederate soldiers ! No greater eulogy can be bestowed upon 
them. They died for Dixie. 

In those far off days of their childhood Bennett was my favorite. 
Once his teacher, Miss Evertson, was sick for a month and Dr. Smedes 
asked me to hear his lessons. I was very proud of the distinction, so 
regularly the last half hour in school, Mrs. Smedes would bring him to 
me with a clean apron on and hair brushed becomingly. As soon as she 
left us, Bennett would climb up in my arms and read for a few minutes 
and then entertain me with much interesting conversation about his 
rambles in the grounds back of the school. They were extensive and 
there was a certain stream of water which flowed therein. I am afraid 
it was swampy, but it was his delight. He told me, I think, about cute 
little frogs and dear little snakes that peopled that realm of his. Always 
I have had a nervous horror of snakes. I can tolerate frogs at a dis- 
tance, they really have a self-satisfied air of wisdom and conceit, too, as 
if they had drunk deep of the "Pierian Spring," but snakes ! However, 
my love for Bennett was stronger than my hatred for snakes, and I 
listened to all he had to say indulgently, though I may have had cold 
chills and shivers. 

We had a goodly corps of teachers. Dr. Mason ruled Senior and 
Junior, and I for one loved and reverenced him with all my strength. 
He was to me the embodiment of all learning. I never could decide 
which one I loved best, Dr. Mason or Dr. Smedes, and I haven't decided 
that question yet. They were so entirely different except in their deep 
and true devotion to the Church, their unfeigned humility as Christian 
men, their powers of mind and soul, devoted to the Master and His 
cause, willing and anxious to spend and be spent in His service. En- 
tirely different types in personal appearance, Dr. Smedes with his clear- 
cut features illumined by his gracious smile, Dr. Mason, rugged of fea- 
ture, near-sighted eyes, and some traces of the years he had passed. He 
rarely smiled ; when he did it was a burst of sunlight, and when he gave 
us some rare words of approval, we were most happy and unlifted. My 
seat in class was next him by his request. For a long time I think Sue 



The St. Maky's Muse. 15 



Battle from Chapel Hill had a seat next him. She was considered his 
favorite, and well deserved the distinction for her sprightliness and in- 
telligence. 

What teacher comes next? Madame Clement, of course, with her 
attractive French ways, her strenuous voice and her commanding per- 
sonality. Madame mostly wore silk dresses, and there was always some 
bright ribbon in evidence. Her toilet table in her room was draped in 
sheer white muslin, with lace edging, over pink lining. Her lounge 
cushions of bright colors, brackets, vases of flowers, etc. In those days 
hats for everybody but men were an unknown quantity. Madame, when 
she walked out after breakfast to look at her flowers, always wore bonnet 
and mantle. I was awfully afraid of her for several months. I re- 
member on one occasion she and I were left alone in the parlor, she 
putting things to rights, and I, I think, waiting for my music lesson. 
She told me to sweep out some debris that had gathered about the stove. 
and handed me a big wooden-handled broom which I could barely lift 
from the floor. She looked at my feeble attempts and muttered some- 
thing of which I caught some words, to the effect that these "American 
girls thought they were Duchesses and couldn't even sweep a floor " 
But we became real friends before I left school. I was there when her 
daughter Eleanor came. Poor little girl! I was so sorry for her. 
She had not seen her mother for years. Madame had left her with 
some aunts, sisters of Monsieur Clement, who had evidently petted 
Eleanor and loved her very dearly. jSTow Madame never petted any 
one and I am sure Eleanor missed it I saw her in tears one day and 
she told me she was "si triste," that Ealeigh was so unlike Paris. 
Raleigh in the forties must have been very unlike Paris ! Eleanor and 
I were always good friends. I have some of her little French notes now, 
and after I left school and they had left Raleigh we still had some 
intercourse. That Eleanor's feelings for Raleigh and St. Mary's greatlv 
changed since the time she was "si triste" she proved by her bequest. 

Next teacher in authority and personality was our German Music 
Master, Gustave Blessner, composer and performer on piano and violin, 
and the very cleanest and neatest looking man of that "ilk" I ever saw. 
Every day and oftener sometimes a fresh toilette. Kind generally, and 



16 The St. Mart's Muse. 



very painstaking when a pupil tried to please him and had some talent, 
but quite like Vesuvius is just now, when we failed and when he and 
Madame came into collision. There was always internecine war waged 
between them, and we were sometimes hearers of a curious mixture of 
French and German oaths used by Mr. Blessner. I was not not an 
expert in French and an entire ignoramus as regarded German, so for 
quite a while I was totally unaware of the profanity of which I am 
afraid Mr. Blessner was guilty. 

Mrs. Blessner, a lovely English lady, was the embodiment of gentle 
self control and control of Mr. Blessner too. She could always quiet 
the storm. She was a most lovely Christian character, and we girls, 
blissfully ignorant of love and its vagaries, always wondered how she 
came to link her fate with Mr. Blessner. Still most of us liked him 
and found him attractive. He was very kind to me and I have a 
pleasant memory of him. Mrs. Blessner had a pet lap dog, Betsy by 
name, with long, silky, white hair and red eyes. She always brought 
Betsy to the Music Room when she gave lessons. She was put on one 
side of the piano and slept. peacefully, doubtless dreaming of harmony. 

There were several other teachers, — Miss Thompson, Miss Benners, 
Miss Green, Miss Evertson, an habitual sufferer, Mr. and Mrs. Brune, 
but I was not in their classes except, occasionally, in Mr. Brune's 
Algebra. 

Two sisters, the Misses Kissam, I remember very well, and Miss 
Lizzie, the elder, I remember very tenderly. I was in her dormitory 
when I first went to school, and she was so sweet and sympathetic with 
my recurring attacks of homesickness. These ladies were very popular 
with the girls and highly esteemed by Dr. Smedes. They had a very 
young sister with them, Addie Kissam, and they were so devoted to her. 
They wore deep mourning and I fancied had lost their mother and were 
trying to fill her place with Addie, the younger girl. 

And now for these important features of a school, the girls. — Sarah 
Bailey, Judge Bailey's lovely daughter, was my first acquaintance and 
friend. Dr. Smedes commended me to her kindly care the day I 
arrived; she made me acquainted with Mollie Grandan, afterwards Mrs. 
Lucius Johnson, so I began my school life under favorable auspices — 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 

for these girls ranked very high in the estimation of the teachers, and 
were much beloved by the scholars. So many I want to speak of, so 
many I dearly loved — among them Kate DeRosset (Mrs. Meares), the 
brightest, merriest girl, full of fun and frolic and distractingly pretty. 
She was a favorite with Dr. Smedes, a good scholar, very fine performer 
on the piano and the sweetest song bird of the school. At least she and 
Jeanne Daves divided the honors. Jeanne was a singer by inheritance, 
her mother was richly endowed with the glorious gift. There were the 
dear New Bern girls, Fannie Blacknell, Jeanne Daves, Annie and Eliza- 
beth Smallwood, Sallie Emery, Annie Justice, Julia McLen. Julia 
was my alcove mate at one time, and I dearly love her. 

There were three girls considered the crowning acme of St. Mary's — 
three perfect girls in scholarship, deportment, in everything, who never 
missed a lesson, and never broke a rule — Lavinia Gatling, from Hert- 
ford, and Annie Smallwood and Bella Parker; the three sisters, my 
dear friends, Eliza, ISFeppie and Pattie Battle ; the quaint little girls 
from Louisburg, Vinia Perry and Tempie Neal ; two sisters from the 
same county, Arete and Otelia Johnson, as good as gold and brightly 
intelligent. 

It was in this year that Mr. Hart painted the picture of Bishop Ives 
in the Rite of Confirmation. 

The girls in the picture were my school-mates, Mittie Saunders, a 
Senior, Lucy Raegon, Sarah Crawford and Eugenia Hinton. Lucy 
Raegon is the one of whose face we have a side view. She was a hand- 
some girl with very dark or black hair. She left school the session I 
joined in ('45). Sarah Crawford is painted with the Bishop's hands 
on her head. She afterwards married a Methodist minister and came 
to Warrenton to live as Mrs. Archer. I saw her often, and I think her 
husband was popular there, but one of their little children died and she 
was in such grief that she was unwilling to stay, and he sought another 
field of work. Lucy I have never seen since she left school. But we 
sat close together at the French table by Dr. Smedes ; and I have a vivid 
remembrance of her. After she left Kate DeRosset sat near Dr. Smedes. 
That French table was a trial. We were not allowed to speak English, 
and I have an idea that my appetite was not always appeased from an 



18 The St. Mart's Muse. 



inability to be as fluent in French as nxy hunger demanded. But no 
one ever suffered in Dr. Smedes' neighborhood. Eugenia Hinton lived 
at one time in Mississippi, but I have not heard anything of her in many 
years. Dr. Smedes used to take an omnibus filled with girls to Mr. 
Hart's studio to see him at work on the painting, and we enjoyed it to 
the full. 

There were several separate recitation rooms. Dr. Smedes habitually 
sat in the school room. In the basement was Dr. Mason's room for 
Seniors and Juniors. Madame had the opposite room for her French 
classes. We always had morning service and Bible lecture at nine 
o'clock ; at night prayers at the same hour. In the afternoon we had 
to exercise at least two hours, generally in the grove, though for severaj 
weeks Dr. Smedes took us directly through the State house and a mile 
beyond, so on our return we had accomplished a four-mile walk. Dr. 
Smedes with a teacher headed the procession, and it was a goodly sight. 
I think he liked to walk through town with his "little daughters," as he 
almost always called us. 

I have omitted to speak of Mrs. Smedes's corps of assistants in do- 
mestic machinery. I am ashamed to say I have forgotten the name of 
the cook, though I can see her quite plainly, turning out the loaves of 
bread and the hot cakes we always had for Sunday tea. One of the 
corps was a tall, gaunt person who rejoiced in the name of Serena. So 
much for the colored help, I remember, but first in nursery and store- 
room was Cornelia DePeyster, who came to Raleigh with Mrs. Smedes 
as nurse for her children. I have an impression that she was from New 
England, though she was not Puritanical, but a devout member of our 
church and a strict attendant on its service. It is impossible to describe 
"Peyster," as most of us called her. I did try to give her the respect 
of her baptismal name, but she readily came to call as Peyster. She 
was mistress of the store room. Surely there never was mortal woman 
so little troubled with the personal graces of womanhood. She was 
homely in face and figure, but Peyster was good as gold and always 
respectful and kind in manner. When we were sick she could make 
the best buttered toast hungry school girls ever reveled in, but alas ! 
toast was not the only symbol of her presence. She was Madame ; s 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



minister to bring the medicine we had to take, whether we needed it or 
not, if Madame thought we did. Peyster also had the dignity of wear- 
ing bonnets into morning service. In those benighted, far-off days, 
child and woman had to wear rather close fitting bonnets. The liberty 
which the modern girl enjoys of decking her pretty head with a choice 
flower garden or a slight superstructure of straw or chiffon was denied 
to us. "a plain straw bonnet with a plain broad, blue ribbon crossing 
the top and tied under the chin surmounted on blue dresses in winter 
and on white in summer. Mrs. Smedes, Madame, Mrs. Blessner, indeed 
all the teachers and Peyster, went to Chapel to daily service with their 
heads decorously covered. L. Gatling and I think Annie Smallwood. 
being models for school propriety, also donned their head-gear, but the 
rest of us, I think, couldn't live up to bonnets, so we went bareheaded 
except on Sundays and Holy Days. Mrs. Blessner was organist and 
"discoursed eloquent music" at all times. One trial for Sundays we 
had, that is to listen so attentively to the sermon that we could give a 
creditable analysis or synopsis of it to Dr. Smedes at Evening Prayers. 
So after service we girls gathered into groups to walk around the circle 
and talk over the sermon with the grand old trees keeping guard and 
whispering a benediction. I wonder if all of us in our long lives since 
then have not been restrained from evil and incited to good by the 
memory of those hours so calm and bright. 

Dr. Smedes's library was a charming apartment, books suited to our 
needs and for our recreation were at our disposal. Then I think I first 
made my acquaintance with Cooper. Miss Edgeworth, Miss Lewis and 
Miss Yonge may have come later. I had already drawn inspirations 
from Scott and knew Oliver Twist and Mr. Bamble well enough to 
speak to, especially the "Artfnls." 

In my second session several changes greeted us on arrival. There 
was a very dear young treasure, Master Abe, added to the family circle, 
and Peyster, the beloved, the invaluable, returned to New York during 
the year, for what reason I have forgotten, but clearly, I am sure, at the 

call of duty. 

Dr. Smedes had installed a French woman, Mde. Pechi, who could 
not speak one word of English or understand one, who rivaled Peyster 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



in pure, unfeigned ugliness, and, unlike that worthy, seemed to know 
little of the treasures hidden in soap and water. I am not asserting a 
fact, only it seemed so, and more than one copy book in past days 
assured us that "appearances are deceitful." Mde. Pechi was more 
generous than Peyster in the matter of butter to our bread. Dr. Smedes 
had told us to go to the store room any time between meals for bread, 
but not butter. Of course we always had a liberal supply of food at 
the table and very good butter, but bread at odd times had to be butter- 
less. Nevertheless Mde. Pechi could be induced to find some for her 
favorites. In those days school girls were always ready for gastronomic 
exercises, in spite of liberal boxes from home which we were allowed to 
receive whenever our friends chose to send them, and we did have to 
take so much exercise, no wonder we always enjoyed refreshments of 
any kind. Oh ! the ecstatic delight of a box from home ! The roast 
turkey, the dainty country ham, the broiled chicken, the big pound cake 
with its attendant satellites of maple biscuit and puff-pan delights, the 
pickles, the fruit, the everything! Who would not be a school girl 
again and revel in a box from home and the luxury of a liberal disposal 
of contents to teachers and school friends ? 

Another new arrival at school was an Italian boy to wait at table and 
go on errands. He could not speak or understand English, but spoke 
French as freely as he did Italian. Dr. Sniedes's pet plan was to make 
us accomplished French scholars. This young person, about fifteen or 
sixteen I think, was called Canido. He was by no means the Italian 
type for good looks, and he had a smile that incensed the girls. I 
think he was a perfectly harmless, good-natured boy whose dusky fea- 
tures resolved themselves into that odious leer from sheer good temper 
and a benevolent desire to hand biscuit and bread as soon as he could. 
But we did not approve of that boy, and thus he bore no message of 
beauty from Italy. 

One of the school girls I remember was Emily Hanks, from New York, 
who played exquisitely on the harp. I think we all remember her "Blue 
Bells." There were so many girls so closely associated with school life 
and my life since that I want to mention my dear friends, Lucy and 
Harriet Clark, two of the best and loveliest daughters of St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



Harriet was especially devoted to Mrs. Smedes, who warmly returned 
the girlish devotion. We had a beautiful girl from Norfolk, a near 
relative of Lieutenant Maury of Physical Geography fame, and her 
cousin, Helen McMorrow, a very superior attractive girl ; Judge Daniel's 
daughters, Mary Long and Lucy, the latter an embryo poetess ; my dear 
cousin, Lena Eaton, who was afterwards both a beauty and very attract 
tive; Emily Freeman, their cousin; Augusta and Maggie Henry; Co- 
rinne Townsend and Mary Grissapel. We had, too, a very wealthy 
girl among us, Sallie Broadnax, sufficiently rich to have $100 bills in 
her pocket book. I remember she lost one once and bore the loss with 
quite unruffled calm and dignity. And there was Martha Hinton, beau- 
tiful Annie Haywood, a dear friend of mine, Lizzie Shaw, and others. 

We had only one or two regular Musical Soirees during the session, 
when the handsome rooms were opened to the crowd, but there were 
some musical evenings when visitors or friends came to the school. 

There are many trifling incidents I could speak of, but I am afraid I 
have trespassed too long on the patience of my dear sisters of St. Mary's, 
but you must know that the very fact that we have lived the life of St. 
Mary's binds us to all who have or are living it in a bond that can not 
be broken. That is one characteristic of place and people, and we feel 
the sincerest interest and affection in each other. 

We of the 40's were close students, or many of us were. There were 
none of the attractive societies of these modern days, none of the social 
life that marks the St. Mary's of to-day. Dr. Smedes gave us all the 
recreation and variety he could in a quiet way. He invited singers and 
performers to the school for our delectation, and would take us in town 
to attend their concerts. His lectures on Chemistry and Philosophy 
and Astronomy were heightened in interest by all the appliances to 
these studies. We followed the pathway of the stars with the aid of 
his telescope, and Kate even inhaled "laughing gas," in the 40's (on one 
occasion only) — but we lived strictly at home and found our happiness 
there. 

I had the great pleasure of having Dr. Smedes and Dr. Mason at our 
home in years that followed my school days, and my home people 
became as devoted to them as I was and am. Dr. Smedes had a keen 



22 The St. Mart's Muse. 



sense of humor. He enjoyed Dickens with a zest I have rarely seen 
equaled, and liked to quote the immortal Snagby's favorite remark "not 
to put too fine a point on it." He was grand in the fullest sense of the 
word during the war, and gave his boys, our dear Southern boys, to 
suffering and hardship and death without a murmur. I have several, 
pictures of him, some of my old note-books, and my Bible Lesson Books 
that he used in class. 

To dear Dr. Mason I owe my first acquaintance with the giants in 
intellect, Shakespeare, Milton, and others. A letter from him, a cluster 
of flowers he gave me the last day of school, when he bade me good-bye, 
and a Prayer Book, his last gift, are among my dearest treasures. The 
flowers I pressed and keep in my school album, a book fragrant with 
the memory of St. Mary's. 

So with these I close my record of the Forties, but my love and rever- 
ence for my teachers, my true sisterly regard for my schoolmates, for 
all the daughters of St. Mary's is immortal. 

I omitted the mention of a very dear lady, Mrs. Cotton, who boarded 
at the school when I was there. She had two grandchildren at school, 
Virginia Wright and Eliza Thompson, I think were their names. There 
was a young lady with her too, Miss Lizzie Cofield. I have an idea 
she afterwards married some relation of Mrs. Cotton. They were very 
lovely additions to the St. Mary's Establishment. 



The Minutes of the pounders' Day Meetings of the Alumnae, 

November 1, 1907. 



Asheville Chapter. 

The Alumna?, of Asheville, 1ST. C, met with Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell, 
on Church street, Friday, November first, at four o'clock, the occasion 
being All Saints' Day — or, as it is known at St. Mary's, — "Founder's 
Day." Dr. McCready, the Rector of Trinity Church, Asheville, was 
present and opened the meeting with a few collects. He then read Mr. 
Lay's letter to the Alumna?., which was enjoyed and appreciated by all 
present. 

Mrs. Mitchell told of the object of these yearly meetings — that it was 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



to be no money-making scheme for St. Mary's, but was just held to 
keep in memory Founder's Day, and to try to keep the Alumna in the 
different places more in touch with the St. Mary's of to-day. Mrs. 
Mitchell also spoke of the All Saints' Memorial Window, to be erected, 
it is hoped, in the near future in the Chapel at St. Mary's, and of the 
two scholarships — the Kate McKimmon and the Mary Iredell, Only 
six were present, those being Misses Sherrill, Schuessler, Cushman, Red- 
wood, and Mrs. Mitchell. The meeting would have been better attended 
had not so many Alumna? been out of towu, and sickness also claimed 
several of them. The weather was rather inclement also. The six who 
were present appeared interested and, after delicious refreshments, the 
meeting adjourned. 

Much credit is due Mrs. Mitchell, the promoter of the meeting, and 
had she had a little longer notice the meeting would have been, no 
doubt, better attended. 

EXTRA. 

May I, as an Alumna of dear old St. Mary's, tell what sweet, happy 
memories our meeting at Mrs. Mitchell's on Founder's Day brought 
back to me. As Dr. McCready said the collects, among them that lovely 
prayer, "Oh God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the Faithful," etc., (I am 
sure every girl who has been at St. Mary's knows it), it seemed to me 
I was back once more in the little Chapel ; it wasn't enlarged then, but 
we loved it just as well, and my ! how we used to vie with each other in 
decorating it, when it came our turn to be on the Altar Guild, and how 
we used to go to the woods for autumn leaves, dog-wood, and all other 
flowers appropriate to deck our chancel for the different festivals. Ah, 
yes, and many a Sunday morning I have broken my neck dressing to 
get over to the Chapel to help Miss Katie prepare for the early service. 
What a privilege I thought it, if Miss Katie would let me help her, and 
really it was. Miss Katie was never enthusiastic, but if she tolerated 
my assistance, I thought myself indeed honored. Dear Miss Katie, how 
she loved the little Chapel. Yes, I seemed to be back again in the 
Chapel, and oh ! was it Dr. Bratton's voice in that same prayer ? "Oh 
God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the Faithful, visit we pray Thee this 
school with Thy love and favor," etc. Xo one can ever say it as he 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 

could or ever will, I believe. His very intonation was as inspiration. 
How my thoughts flew. Yes, I was marching out of the Chapel and 
wondering if I would get any mail that evening, and would we have 
any time to dance before study hour. Ah ! was that the bell ? No, 
where could I be ? Some one was saying very vaguely, it seemed, 
"Won't you have a cup of tea V We never had tea at St. Mary's. 
What could it mean? Ah! now I remember, I am not at St. Mary's 
any more. I am at Mrs. Mitchell's at an Alumnae meeting, and these 
young ladies with hats and veils and furs, are they the same little 
girls I was with at St, Mary's ? Why, they use to wear their hair in 
braids. At last I was fully awake and realized what a host of memories 
an Alumnae meeting on Founder's Day brings back. 

Dear girls of the present St. Mary's — I have never gotten over my 
feeling of home-sickness for St. Mary's yet, and it has been several 
years since I was there. I still read the little Muse which, at first, we 
Seniors with out fine Annual just issued predicted would never suc- 
ceed ; and although I know very few girls there now, I always feel your 
interests mine, and every one of you has my love and best wishes. 

Lucy Taylor Redwood, '04. 

ALUMNAE OF ASIiEVILLE, N. C. 

Mrs. T. W. Pattern. Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell. 

Fanny L. Pattern. Daisy Sherrill. 

Miss Lily Jones. Lottie Sherrill. 

Grace Jones. Agnes Carter. 

Mrs. Thos. A. Jones. Susie Carter. 

Mrs. T. F. Davidson. Alice Devenish. 

Maria Brown. Rebecca Cushman. 

Mrs. W. M. Jones. Elsie Gudger. 

Sarah Jones. Christine Schuessler. 

Cammie Jones. Lucy Taylor Redwood. 

Virginia Miller. 



Chapel Mill Chapter. 
Dear Muse: — Do not think that I have forgotten to send you an 
account of our Alumnae meeting here, but I have been sick since then 
and unable to do so. With the few that we had it was almost impos- 
sible to have a formal meeting, so we decided not to attempt a regular 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



program, but to have instead a woman's substitute for a "smoker." So 
we had a very informal meeting at my home after the church service on 
Friday morning. I read them Mr. Lay's letter and the editorial on 
Founder's Day — light refreshments were served, and we discussed St. 
Mary's and its past, present, future, teachers and girls, with many 
anecdotes of our life there. It was nice to come in touch with it again, 
and I think we all enjoyed it. There were present — 

Miss Mary Manning, 1877-78. 

Mrs. F. P. Venable (Sallie C. Manning), 1879-80. 

Mrs. Archibald Henderson (Minna Bynum), grad. 1899. 

Louise Venable, grad. 1902. 

Mary Graves, 1901-03. 

Cantey Venable, 1902-03. 

Dora McRae, 1903-04. 

Miss Virginia Kyser, of Rocky Mount, who was visiting here at the 
time was also with us. Miss Anna Lewis, class of 1885, who is taking 
a course in the University, and Mrs. W. D. Toy (Jane W. Bingham, 
class of 1886), were in Chapel Hill, but were unable to be present. No 
regular chapter was organized and we have no suggestions to offer, but 
all of us are interested in St. Mary's and her progress, and will always 
be glad to do whatever w^e can for her in any way. 

I have not been able to finish a list of Alumnae statistics, so that 
will have to be sent later. 

Sincerely yours, Louise Manning Venable. 

Chapel Hill, N. C, November 6th. 



Charlotte Chapter. 

The St. Mary's Alumna?, of Charlotte, N. C, met in the Vestry Room 
of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Friday afternoon, November 1, 1907. 
The meeting was opened by the President, Mrs. J. Frank Wilkes, who 
read the prayer for the school. The "Founder's Day Remarks" and the 
Letter of Greeting from the Rector of St. Mary's were then read to the 
Alumna? present. 

A motion was made and carried that an effort should be made to 
assist in raising the "Iredell and McKimmon Scholarships." A list of 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



the Alumnse in Charlotte was then made consisting of the following 
names : 

Mrs. Sarah Virginia Young. 

Mrs. Margaret Davis. 

Mrs. J. S. Meyers (Mamie Rawlinson), 1870. 

Mrs. Laura Johnston (Laura Hapholt). 

Mrs. W. R. Taliaferro (Dadie Lippett), 1876. 

Mrs. R. Lockwood Jones (Rosalie Wilkes), 1879. 

Mrs. J. S. Watters (Kate Lord). 

Mrs. W. E. Stitt (Lina Battle), 18S5. 

Mrs. J. Frank Wilkes (Fannie Lucas), 1883. 

Mrs. Heriot Clarkson (Mamie Osborne). 

Mrs. E. Reid Russell (Fannie Marler). 

Mrs. Clement Dowd (Frances Tunstall), 1892. 

Mrs. Jos. R. Ross (Mary Warren Cameron). 

Mrs. John R. Yorke (Fan Rogers). 

Mrs. L. B. Newell (Annie Rogers), 1887. 

Mrs. Charles Allison (Hattie Orr). 

Mrs. C. D. Craig (Cecye Dodd). 

Mrs. Frances Osborne (Mary Winder Bryan). 

Mrs. C. H. C. Mills (Eliza Lamb). 

Mrs. Carlton Best (Mamie Beaman). 

Mrs. Robt. L. Tate (Lois Holt). 

Mrs. Baxter S. Moore (Caro Brevard). 

Mrs. Frank Lahdis (Carrie May Dockery). 

Miss Rebecca Hill. Miss Leonora Seay. 

Miss Julia Johnston. Miss Stuart Jones. 

Miss Janie Haughton. Miss Sarah Jones. 

Miss Alice Haughton. Miss Alice Moore. 

Miss Josephine Osborne. Miss Marguerite Springs. 

Miss Florence Thomas. Miss Blandina Springs. 

Miss Helen Katharine Liddell. Miss Nettie Dockery. 

Miss Maude Holt. Miss Julia J. Bryce. 

The Alumnse then held an election of new officers with the follow- 
ing result : President, Mrs. J. Frank Wilkes ; Secretary, Miss Alice 
Haughton. 

All present expressed deep regret over the absence of one member 
from the meeting, Miss Alice Pearson, who has been ill at St, Peter's 
Hospital for several months. The meeting then adjourned. 

Frances S. Dowd, 

Secretary Pro Tern, 



The St. Maey's Muse. 27 

Edenton Chapter. 

On Friday, November 1st, All Saints' Day, the Alurunae of St. Mary's 
in Edenton held a meeting at the home of Miss Eliza Drane in com- 
memoration of Founders' Day. 

Rev. Dr. Drane, Rector of St. Paul's Church, and one of the Trustees 
of St. Mary's, opened the meeting with prayers, followed by a few appro- 
priate remarks. He acted as Chairman of the meeting until the elec- 
tion was held, when Miss Eliza Drane was chosen Chairman and Miss 
Duncan Winston, Secretary, after which he retired from the meeting. 

Mrs. James Warren then read an article on "Founders' Day," taken 
from the Muse, after which Mrs. Pruden read a letter of greeting from 
the Rector, Dr. Lay, bringing us in touch with the St. Mary's body. 
Mrs. Frank Wood read a delightful sketch by Miss Degen, "When Mc- 
Kimmonsville Flourished," which was found in an Alumna? Muse. 

Attention was drawn to some of the Alumnse objects now on hand, 
and the question of the "All Saints' Window" and the Iredell and 
McKimmon Scholarships were freely discussed. It was voted by those 
present that it seems best to spend all our efforts on the scholarship, and 
to take up the window later, since so much has been done in the Chapel 
recently and the scholarships would be such a real advantage to girls 
who might otherwise be unable to get to St. Mary's. Mrs. Julian Wood 
read a letter from the Committee on Scholarship Endowment, and 
several present expressed their desire and intention to contribute through 
the Treasurer in Raleigh. It was decided that the best way of reaching 
the former students in regard to the scholarship work was through com- 
mittees when the Alumnse are organized, otherwise to write to them 
individually. 

Motion was made and duly carried that a Chapter be organized in 
Edenton, which will be known as a The Daughters of St. Mary's," since 
there is a Parish organization here known as "St. Mary's Guild." It 
was agreed that we meet twice a year, on Founders' Day and the twelfth 
of May, the day St. Mary's was opened. 

Miss Winston read an article on "Alumnse Records," after which ar- 
rangements were made that a list of all Alumna? in this community be 
secured and forwarded to St. Mary's, as requested. 



28 The St. Mart's Muse. 

The Alma Mater Mr. Hodgson wrote is too new for us to be able to 
sing it — for we are "old girls" — but we were glad to hear it read, and 
hope to become more familiar with it. 

It was decided that the officers for this meeting continue until the 
May meeting, when a permanent election will be held. After this, the 
meeting was adjourned. 

Those present at the meeting were — 

Mrs. Edward Wood (Mary Shaw). Mrs. Julien Wood (Elizabeth Badham). 

Mrs. Frank Wood (Rebecca Collins). Mrs. Llewella Hogan (Llewella Makely). 

Mrs. Wm. D. Pruden (Annie Wood). Mrs. R. H. Bachrnan (Annie M. Walker) 

Mrs. M. H. Dixon (Sallie Dillard). Miss Eliza Drane. 

Mrs. James Warren (Pattie Wood). Miss Sophie Wood. 

Miss Henrietta Collins. Miss Duncan Winston. 
Miss Mary Beverly Dixon. 

It was a privilege and pleasure to have with us Mrs. George Collins, 
of Hillsboro, who, though not a St. Mary's girl herself, sent several 
daughters there, and now has a granddaughter there. 

Regret was expressed at the absence of a number who were unable to 
attend. Eliza H. Drane, '01. 

ALUMNAE OF ST. MARY'S IN EDENTON, N. C. 

Mrs. R. H. Bachman (Annie Walker, '99). Mrs. H. G. Wood (Mary Phillips). 

Mrs. James Warren (Pattie Wood, 'SO). Mrs. John Wood (Bessie Martin). 

Mrs. Wm. Badham (Lucy Bond, '90). Mrs. Edward Wood (Mary Shaw). 

Mrs. M. H. Dixon (Sallie Dillard). Mary Beverly Dixon, 1902. 

Mrs. Llewella Hogan (Llewella Makely). Agnes Makely, 1902. 

Mrs. H. M. S. Cason (Alice Makely, '99). Margaret Pruden, 1901. 

Mrs. Wm. D. Pruden (Annie Wood). Sophie Wood, 1901. 

Mrs. Frank Wood (Rebecca Collins). Carrie Coke. 

Mrs. Julien Wood ( Elizabeth Badham). Eliza H. Drane, 1901. 

Mrs. D. C. Winston (Bettie Creecy, '64). Duncan Winston, 1902. 

Mrs. Wm. Y. Warren (Fannie Badham). 



Hillsboro Chapter. 

On to-day, the Feast of All Saints, the St. Mary's Alumnae in Hills- 
boro, 1ST. C, met for the first time for the observance of Founders' Day 

Owing to sickness and absence from town, the attendance was small, 

those present being — 

Miss Lily R. Hamilton, Mrs. Joseph Webb, 

Miss Rebecca Hill, Miss Sue Hayes. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 

The meeting was necessarily informal, but, as far as possible, the 
programme sent from St. Mary's was carried out by Miss Hamilton. 
After the discussion of the Alumnae objects now on hand, the ways and 
means to assist, and reminiscences from those present of the happy days 
spent at St. Mary's, the meeting adjourned until next year, when we. 
hope for a full and enthusiastic attendance. Even this small beginning 
has aroused interest. Sue B. Hayes. 

St. Mary's Alunmse residing in Hillsboro — 

Mrs. Thomas Ruffin (Mary C. Cain). Mrs. Chas. R. Thomas (Mary Ruffin). 

Miss Rebecca Hill. Miss Lily Roulhac Hamilton. 

Miss Maria Beard. Miss Henrietta P. Collins. 

Mrs. Joseph C. Webb (Alice Hill). Miss Sue Hayes. 

Mrs. W. L. Roulhac (Nannie Broadnax). Miss Annie Graham. 

Mrs. T. Norfleet Webb (Annis Peebles). Miss Maria Webb. 



MorgaQtoo Chapter. 

Dear Muse : — Immediately after the service on the morning of All 
Saints' Day there was a meeting of the St. Mary's Alunmse held in the 
Rectory parlor. The suggested program was followed almost exactly. 
Mr. DuBose was Chairman for the occasion, and after having the open- 
ing prayers and reading Mr. Lay's letter, he gave us a short talk about 
the Memorial All Saints' Window and the two Scholarships. The read- 
ing of "McKimmonsville" completely broke the ice and every "old 
girl" present began to tell what she remembered best about "dear old St. 
Mary's." Many photographs of the different buildings and innumerable 
Muses were examined with the greatest interest. Especial emphasis 
was laid on the monthly Muse's power of bringing St. Mary's into every 
"old girl's" home, however far away she might happen to be. We hope 
to send in a number of subscriptions very soon. A St. Mary's Guild 
was organized, not to meet more than four or five times a year, but to 
keep up the interest in our Alma Mater, to take the Muse, and to secure 
as many students for the school as possible. 

As a list of most of the Alumna? here we send the following : 

Margaret Walton (Mrs. McKesson), 1854. 
Mary Louise Erwin, 1864-65. 
Lizzie Matilda Erwin, 1865. 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Cora S. MacDowell, 1872-73. 

Annie M. MacDowell (Mrs. Walton), 1871-3. 

Kate Sprague (Mrs. Silver), 1883-84. 

Mary E. Tillinghast, 1890-93. 

Margaret McKesson (Mrs. Davis), 1900. 

Ada M. Pearson, 1905. 

Malinda Tillinghast, 1900-05. 

Margaret DuBose, 1902-07. 

Mrs. McKesson was elected President of the Guild ; Mrs. Silver, Vice- 
President ; and Miss DuBose, Secretary and Treasurer. 

If Founders' Day revived as much St. Mary's interest everywhere as 
it did here the idea is certainly an excellent one. With best wishes for 
the Muse's long and useful existence, 

Margaret DuBose, '05, Secretary. 



Oxford Chapter. 

Minutes of Founders' Day Meeting in Oxford. 

On November 1st, All Saints' Day, the home of Judge and Mrs. A. 
W. Graham was the scene of a happy gathering. It was a meeting of 
old St. Mary's girls in Oxford for the observance of Founders' Day of 
their Alma Mater. The guests were received by Mrs. Graham and her 
sister, Miss Mary E. Horner, both loyal students of St. Mary's. After 
cordial greetings among the guests, Miss Horner opened the meeting 
with prayers, including the special prayer for St. Mary's. Mrs. H. G 
Cooper, a graduate of St, Mary's and who is pleasantly remembered 
there as Julia Horner, was appointed Chairman of the meeting. The 
following Oxford Alumnae were present : 

Mesdames Graham, Cooper, H. G. Williams, Misses Horner, Mary 
Cooper, Elnora Williams, Mary Pride Jones and Jeanette Biggs. 

The suggested program for Founders' Day was used and enjoyed by 
all present. It was decided by the Alumnae that the best plan would be 
to devote all our energy to raising money for the "All Saints' Window." 
It was voted that the time had come to organize an Alumnae Chapter in 
Oxford. Jeanette E. Biggs was appointed to act as Secretary of the 
meeting and send the minutes to Rev. Mr. Lay. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 

Many pleasant incidents of days spent at dear old St. Mary's were 
recalled and related. 

Dainty refreshments were seiwed by Mrs. Graham and all voted it a 
most pleasant evening, leaving with deeper love and admiration for St. 
Mary's and with renewed energy to do all in their power for the enlarg- 
ing and uplifting of their Alma Mater. 

Jeanette E. Biggs (1901), Secretary. 

Mrs. A. W. Graham ( Lucy A. Horner ) . Kate Horner. 

Mrs. M. C. Cannady (Mary Crudup). Annie Taylor. 

Mrs. H. G. Cooper (Julia Horner). Mary P. Jones. 

Mrs. H. G. Williams (Kate Cannady). Mary Cooper. 

Mrs. C. H. Landis (Marian Thorp). Elnora Williams. 

Mrs. Harry Bryan (Ellen Cooper). Jeannette Biggs. 

Mrs. S. Easton (Sallie Herndon). Belle Thorp. 
Julia Winston. 



Rock HiH Chapter. 
Winthrop College, Rock Hill, S. C. 

Dear Muse : — There are only four of us here, Miss Schutt, Miss A. 
E. Jones, Susie Battle and Sadie Jenkins, but we make up for lack of 
numbers by strength of love and loyalty for St. Mary's. On All Saints' 
Day, early in the afternoon, just after we had finished our day's work, 
we went down to one of the teachers' music rooms on the southwest side 
of South Dormitory, where the sun shone in bright, making us glad 
that the day was so fair for the Founders' Day celebrations of "the 
Saints." It was sweet, too, to think about how many other small, loving 
St, Mary's gatherings were being held under that same bright sun. 

We began with the hymn, "For all thy saints who from their labors 
rest," had the prayer from the Office of Institution, the General Thanks- 
giving, and "Our Father," and then we discussed business matters. 

We think that the two objects — the Window and the Scholarships — 
should be carried on at the same time, but that the McKimmon and Ire- 
dell Scholarships should be pushed faster than the other. We think it 
would be well to have Alumna? Associations wherever even two St. 
Mary's girls are, with a meeting required on All Saints' Day every year, 
and with a leader or president who can call an extra meeting whenever 
she sees fit. 



32 The St. Maey's Muse. 



After we had settled these questions for ourselves, Miss Schutt read 
us three articles from the Founders' Day number of the Muse : "Found- 
ers' Day: Its Meaning," "Kecollections of 1848-52" (Mrs. Aiken), and 
"The Confirmation Painting." Then we looked at all the pictures in 
that number and in the 1906 Alumnse number, and we talked and talked, 
and oh! how we did enjoy it! 

Miss Jones had been to St. Mary's in September, and she told us all 
about Mr. and Mrs. Lay and Mrs. Sheib, and how they are nice and 
charming enough even to be St. Mary's people ! 

We finally disbanded after singing as a grand finale and with a large 

amount of true heartiness — 

"St. Mary's, wherever thy daughters may be, 
They love thy high praises to sing." 

We left full of happiness, because we had spent some years of our 
life in that dear place, and full of longing for another sojourn there, for 

"The thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 
Of sweet recollections and love." 

With all best wishes, Sadie Jenkins, '05. 



ScotldQd Neck. Chapter. 

Scotland Neck, N. C, November 6, 1907. 
As resquested, a meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnge of this place was 
held on Founders' Day. We organized and founded a Chapter. I en- 
close a list of those present. We elected — 

President Mrs. P. E. Smith. 

Vice-President Miss Anna B. Clark. 

Secretary and Treasurer Miss Adelaide E. Smith. 

We complied with the program except No. 4. 

There was a discussion on No. 5, and those present decided that in 
their opinion the work for the Window and the Scholarship should be 
pushed concurrently, as some might wish to subscribe for the All Saints* 
Window and some for the Scholarships, and others for both objects. 
The best way of getting the Scholarship before the Alumnse would be 
to appoint a sub-committee in each community. The time has come to 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 



organize Alumnae Chapters, and they could be kept alive by regular 
meetings, where extracts from the Muse could be read, of information 
imparted. Mr. Lay's letter was heard with lively interest, and we 
think it will have good results. I think it may be possible to secure 
some subscriptions to the Scholarships; if so, I will let you hear 
promptly. 

With best wishes for St. Mary's, I am, 

Very truly yours, Adelaide E. Smith, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

PRESENT AT ST. MARY'S ALUMNAE CHAPTER, ORGANIZED NOVEMBER 1, 1907. 

Mrs. P. E. Smith (Rebecca Norfleet Hill, 1847-1848). 
Mrs. I. H. Smith (Sally Frances Bakon, 1S62-1866). 
Mrs. Gideon Lamb (Lily Norfleet Shields, 1881-1882). 
Adelaide Evans Smith, 1856-1859. 
Lena Hill Smith, 1870. 

Mrs. W. D. Shields (Rebecca Winstead Sirith, 1879-1880). 
Anna Barrow Clark, 1903-1905. 
Rebecca Calvert Clark, 1906-1907. 

RESIDENTS HERE, NOT PRESENT, BUT WILL PROBABLY JOIN. 

Mrs. P. H. Herring (Pauline Arrington Shields, 1894-1895). 

Mrs. L. Josey (Martha Herring, 1884-1885). 

Eleanor Stuart Smith. 

Mrs. P. St. George Barrand ( Sally Turner Smith ) . 

Nannie Elizabeth Smith, 1902-1904. 

Martha Gray Vaughan. 

Mrs. Jno. Coughenour (Elizabeth Joyner, 1879-1883). 

Mrs. A. S. Hall (Mary Thompson Dunn, 1900-1902). 



Tarboro Chapter, 

Takboeo, November 15, 1907. 
After the service in church on All Saints' Day, eleven of the old 
scholars of St. Mary's met at Mrs. Nash's, to hear the effort being made 
to observe the day every year in special remembrance of the founder 
and co-workers who gave themselves so entirely to the work of beginning 
and carrying on the school. Part of the suggested program was read, 
words of interest were said, and we decided to revive the St. Mary's 
Guild and do what we can for the Scholarships. We will have four 
meetings during the year : On All Saints', Purification, St. Philip's and 



34 The St. Mary's Muse. 



St James's Day, and the Transfiguration; emphasizing these meetings 
as special work for St. Mary's. 

Miss A. C. Parker was elected President and Miss Miriam Lanier, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



WilmirjgtOQ Chapter. 

A meeting of the Wilmington Alumnse of St. Mary's School was held 
immediately after the eleven o'clock service at St. James's Church on 
Friday, November first, All Saints' Day. The Rev. R. W. Hoguc 
opened the meeting with short prayers, including the prayer for the 
school and an address of welcome. He then retired and the following 
officers were elected to take charge at that meeting: 

Chairman Miss Mary Calder. 

Secretary Miss Jane Iredell Green. 

After that the meeting proceeded with the regular program, as fol- 
lows: 

Founders' Day; Its Message, read by Mrs. A. M. Waddell. 

The reading of Dr. George W. Lay's letter, by Miss Alice Davis. 

The Chairman then brought to the attention of the meeting the two 
objects for which the Alumnae Association at St. Mary's and elsewhere 
are now working: 

1. The All Saints' Window. 

2. The Iredell and McKimmon Scholarships. 

These were discussed and the majority were in favor of pushing both 
concurrently, although the preference seemed rather in favor of the 
scholarships being first established. 

The next question before the meeting was whether the Wilmington 
Alumna? should organize into a regular Chapter. This was then put to 
the vote of the meeting and decided in favor of an organized Chapter 
with regular officers. The purpose of this Chapter is to be ready for 
help in any worthy object when called upon by those at St. Mary's. 
There will be no regular meeting except on Founders' Day, but the 
President can at any time call a meeting when she sees fit to do so. The 
following officers were then elected : 



The St. Mary's Muse. 35 

Honorary President Mrs. Kate Meares. 

President Mrs. A. M. Waddell. 

Vice-President Miss Jennie Murchison. 

Secretary and Treasurer Miss Jane Iredell Green. 

with an Executive Committee, consisting of the officers, Miss Mary Calder and Mrs. 
George Elliott. 

Miss Julia Parsley then read the editorial in the 1906 Founders' 
Day Muse. After that the Chairman appointed a committee, consist- 
ing of Misses Sadie Williams, Elise Emerson and Jane Iredell Green to 
prepare a list of the Wilmington Alumnae and a list of the deaths or 
marriages of the St. Mary's girls, which have not already been published 
in the monthly Muse. 

It was resolved by those present to make our next meeting at least 
twice as large and to stir up the interest of those who have grown out 
of touch with the work and purpose of our beloved Alma Mater. 

During the meeting a telegram was sent to the meeting of the Alumnae 
at St. Mary's, expressing sympathy and good wishes from the Wilming- 
ton Alumnae Association. 

The meeting was then adjourned. 

Those present at the meeting were : 

Mrs. J. W. Murchison, Mrs. W. H. Green, Mrs. Geo. Elliot, Miss 
Jennie Murchison, Miss Mary Reed, Mrs. Lossie Myers, Miss Helen 
Clark, Mrs. Kate Meares, Mrs. A. M. Waddell, Miss Mamie Clark, Miss 
Julia Parsley, Miss Mary Calder, Miss Elise Emerson, Mrs. Cameron 
McRae, Miss Louise Bunting, Mrs. Horace Emerson, Miss Sadie Wil- 
liams, Miss Beulah Armstrong, Miss Alice Davis, Miss Carrie Wright, 
Miss Anita DeRossett, Mrs. Joshua James, Miss Jane Iredell Green. 

Jane Iredell Green, '06, Secretary. 



36 The St. Mart's Muse. 



CONTENTS OF THE FIRST ALUMNAE NUMBER. 

April, 1906. 

"Alma Mater" The School Song H. E. Hodgson. 

ST. MARY'S BEFORE THE WAR. 

The "First Day" of the School Annie Haywood Ruffln. 

My Impressions, 1853-1858 Lucy Moore Capehart. 

A Retrospect Mary McKinlay Nash. 

IN THE WAR DAYS. 

Notes of the Oldest Inhabitant Kate McEimmon. 

Recollections Lucy Walke Gruikshank. 

IN RECONSTRUCTION TIMES. 

"Smedesborongh'' Nellie Jackson Mason. 

THE '80's. 

St. Mary's of a By-gone Day Emilie Watts McVea. 

"To Miss Katie" (Poem) E. W. McVea. 

IN THE 90's. 

When "McKimmonsville" Flourished Jessie Degen. 



CONTENTS OF THE SECOND ALUMNAE NUMBER. 
December, 1906. 

Founders' Day : its message Editorial. 

"First and Last" ( Poem ) Margaret R. DuBose. 

Madame Clement Mary Iredell. 

ANTE-BELLUM REMINISCENCES. 

Recollections of 1848-'52 Fannie Bryan Aiken. 

Scenes in My School Days Madeline Saunders L'Engle. 

St. Mary's in the Later Fifties ( 1856-'60) Nannie Lane Devereux. 

Personal Recollections of St. Mary's Annie Moore Parker. 



The Record of 1905-6. (1) Death; (2) Marriages. 
The Graduates of St. Mary's: 1879-1906. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



The 1908 Annual Muse. 

The Year Book of the Students of 
St. Mary's. 

$2.00 per copy express prepaid. 



THE D0B3IN-FERRALL GO. 

Dry Goods 

OP ALL KINDS 


THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 

Dry Goods, Millinery, 




Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 


Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 


Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 


tains, Draperies, etc. 
LADIES' ELNTE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 


FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Beet of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



W. C. STMACH'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLB STREET 

KING-CROWFLJ/S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



The School authorities will be glad to mail on request the current St. 
Mary's Bulletins, with full information about the school. 

Bulletin 9, General Information (Catalogue). 
Bulletin 11, Academic Courses and Announcements. 
Bulletin 3, Scholarships. 
Bulletin 7, Historical Sketch. 



M. ROSENTHAL 

HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON «fc HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing: Jeweler and Silversmith. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 


For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 


J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 


Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHOKN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 


T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 
St. Mary's Seal Pins, 
St. Mary's Pennants, 
St. Mary's Calendars, 
May be had by writing to The Mtjse. 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

Kinston, N. O, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of J\orth Carolina. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



H 



STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnal inns, Viol< ts, Wedding Bouquets 
Floral Designs, Pa I ins, Ferns and all kinds . 
Raleigh.] ofPlar.ts. [ Phone 113 

ROBT SIMPSON, Dr ^ s ^1er e ^ i n cre s s ; Z. 



ANTICEPHALA.LG1XE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy — China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 


ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


121 Fayetteville Street. 


/^BROUGHTOW*] 
[f/PRL^TLNG COAW 


J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 


HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 

"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 


H. T. HICKS CO. 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 


PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



Sixty-seventh Session of St. Mary's 

opens 

Thursday, September 17, 1908. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


BARRETT & THOMPSON, 


Architects and Engineers, 
raleigh, n. c. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r- 
Capital $15,000. Surplus 150,000. Deposits over 


Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


8750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

THIRD GENERATION OP SUCCESSFUL 
BANKING. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 
W. N. Jones. Vice-President. 
F. H. Briggs, Cashier 
J. B. Timberlake, Ass't Cashier. 

All patrons treated with every courtesy. 
New accounts solicited. Safe Deposit Boxes 
for rent. Fire and Burglar Proof Vault. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, * 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 

J. G. Beown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



Sample copies of the Muse will be mailed 
to Almnnse at any time on request. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERS. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

Millinery. 

St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C 

(for girls and young women). 



66th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 17, 1908. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM' BEGINS JANUARY 21, 1909. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
S. 7 HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: 1 £. THE AR1 SCHOOL 



5. IHE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1907-08 are enrolled 200 students from 16 Dioeeses. 

Twenty-five Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller. Knabe and Steinway Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

VECTOR.